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Thread: Indonesian Airforce Developments

  1. #21

    Russia signs $54-mln arms contract with Indonesia



    Ooh goody, the Indo's now have weapons to hang off their planes! Don't tell Floppsy Bunny he'll go hysterical.............. NOT a lot of arms for that amount of money?

    Russia started the first day at an arms show in Jakarta with a contract on the delivery of munitions for Sukhoi-family fighters to Indonesia, worth $54 million, a senior defense official said on Wednesday.

    The Indo Defense 2010 Expo & Forum opened on November 10 in Jakarta to host over 400 exhibitors from 38 countries until November 13. Nine Russian defense companies are exhibiting various types of sophisticated weaponry at the biennial arms fair.

    "Russia's [arms exporter] Rosoboronexport signed a contract on the delivery of munitions for Su-family fighters in service with the Indonesian armed forces," said Mikhail Pukhov, deputy director of the Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation.

    Russia recently completed a $300-million contract signed in 2007 on the delivery of three Su-30MK2 and three Su-27SKM fighters to Jakarta in addition to two Su-27SK and two Su-30MK fighters purchased in 2003.

    Jakarta became one of Russia's main arms buyers in 1999 when the United States tightened an embargo on arms sales to the country over alleged human rights violations.

    Indonesian Defense Minister Purnomo Yusgiantoro said in October that his country would continue buying arms from Russia in the future.

    JAKARTA, November 10 (RIA Novosti)

  2. #22

    DATE:11/11/10

    SOURCE:Flight International

    Indonesia nears decision on F-16, C-130 upgrades


    By Greg Waldron

    The F-16's will be worth upgrading as they certainly do NOT have a lot of miles on the clock so to speak. Primary use for a while has been as Air Taxis for senior officers.........

    Indonesia should make a decision on a mid-life upgrade for its Lockheed Martin F-16A/Bs in 2011 or 2012, but could also buy an additional batch of six Block 50/52 fighters.

    If the upgrade takes place it will extend the service life of the Indonesian air force's current F-16s from 4,000 to 8,000 flight hours, and make them as capable as new-build models, says an industry source. An upgrade to all 10 aircraft is likely to cost around $150 million.

    Modernisation work would take one year per aircraft, with the work to be conducted in Indonesia using kits provided by Lockheed, according to details revealed at the tri-service Indo Defence Expo & Forum in Jakarta. The air force also wants to acquire Falcon Star and Falcon Up upgrades for its current fighters.

    In addition, Lockheed is pushing for Indonesia to purchase six more F-16s in the Block 50/52 configuration to give it a full squadron of 16 operational aircraft.

    Another option, albeit less likely, would be for the nation to replace its current F-16s with ex-US Air National Guard Block 50/52 airframes. However, these would have a remaining service life of only 1,500h each and be less compatible with the US Air Force's support system for the type.

    Indonesia is also in discussions with Lockheed about a possible service life extension programme for its C-130B/H transports, although the fighter upgrade has the higher priority.

    A decision to upgrade both types would be consistent with the nation's plans to modernise its military. In October, defence minister Purnomo Yusgiantoro said about 150 trillion Indonesian rupiah ($16.8 billion) is needed over the next five years to support the process.

    Indonesia's F-16s and C-130s are a legacy of the Cold War, when Washington considered the nation a key ally. That changed when a US arms embargo was imposed in 1992 after Indonesian soldiers killed East Timorese pro-independence demonstrators. The restrictions were tightened in 1999 after a brutal crackdown in an unsuccessful attempt to prevent East Timor's independence.

    The embargo resulted in the grounding of most of the nation's F-16s until it was lifted in 2005 when Washington began to view Indonesia as a model of a majority-Muslim country that is also a secular democracy.

    Relations have steadily improved, underlined by US President Barack Obama's visit to Indonesia on 9-10 November.

  3. #23

    DATE:11/11/10

    SOURCE:Flight International

    Jakarta earmarks funds for utility helicopter deal


    By Greg Waldron

    Jakarta has earmarked $65 million for new medium utility helicopters, but the Indonesian defence ministry has yet to receive the funds.

    The army plans to use the money to buy a batch of six medium utility helicopters, according to an industry source speaking at the tri-service Indo Defence Expo & Forum in Jakarta. A second batch of eight aircraft would be purchased later.

    Previous reports have suggested that Indonesia's total requirement could be for 24 new utility helicopters; enough to be divided into two squadrons.

    The army has yet to select a type, but has said in the past that it wants a helicopter that can perform both utility and attack roles. However, the industry source says the first role has taken on a greater priority recently.

    Several helicopter manufacturers were present at the Jakarta show, including AgustaWestland, Eurocopter and Indonesian Aerospace (IAe).

    Possible contenders for the requirement include AgustaWestland's AW139, the Eurocopter-promoted NH Industries NH90, and the Bell 412EP, put forward by the US manufacturer and IAe.

  4. #24

    DATE:11/11/10

    SOURCE:Flight International

    Indonesia orders Super Tucanos for light attack role


    By Greg Waldron

    Indonesia plans to buy eight Embraer EMB-314 Super Tucano light attack turboprops, and could eventually double its order - the first for the Brazilian type in the Asia-Pacific region.

    "Air force headquarters has decided to replace our Rockwell OV-10 Broncos with as many as 16 Super Tucanos," says Indonesian air force operational commander Yushan Sayuti, according to a report by the country's official Antara news agency.

    The first Super Tucanos will arrive in 2012 under the initial order, which also includes ground-support stations and a logistics package. Several other types were considered for the requirement, such as the Korea Aerospace Industries KT-1. Eleven of these are in air force service as trainers, says Flightglobal's MiliCAS database.

    "The Super Tucano has been chosen to replace the Broncos because of its flexibility to perform a broad range of missions, including light attack, surveillance, air-to-air interception and counter insurgency," says Embraer. MiliCAS lists Indonesia's active OV-10 fleet at just two aircraft.

    The EMB-314 can operate from unpaved runways with a variety of armaments, including its two wing-housed 12.7mm machine guns. Other weapons can include conventional and laser-guided bombs, plus rocket pods and air-to-air missiles. The aircraft also carries an electro-optical/infrared sensor, laser designator and secure radios with datalinks.


    © Embraer
    Colombia also flies the Super Tucano in the light attack role


    The type can also be used as a trainer, thanks to its advanced avionics fit, and its low-speed performance means it can also perform surveillance tasks.

    The counter-insurgency mission is important to Indonesia, which at various times in its 60-year history has contended with rebel movements in outlying provinces. Broncos provided air support during Indonesia's invasion of East Timor in 1975, and were used extensively against Timorese rebels in the 1970s and 1990s prior to Timor Leste's independence in 2002.

    In addition, a simmering independence struggle in the country's West Papua province sometimes erupts into fighting.

    The Super Tucano is operated by the air forces of Brazil, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic and Ecuador, with the type having now logged over 100,000 flight hourse.

  5. #25

    That's it. We are doomed. The Super Tucano clearly kinematically outclasses our PC-9's in all cardinal performances areas and we are now clearly uncompetitive against them in BVR combat as well as having been long uncompetitive in Close Combat. Only an immediate re-consideration and adoption of the "Australian Industry Solution" can resolve this strategic catastrophe...

  6. #26

    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Digger View Post
    That's it. We are doomed. The Super Tucano clearly kinematically outclasses our PC-9's in all cardinal performances areas and we are now clearly uncompetitive against them in BVR combat as well as having been long uncompetitive in Close Combat. Only an immediate re-consideration and adoption of the "Australian Industry Solution" can resolve this strategic catastrophe...
    LOL. You just need some bar charts and a graphic of the AAC Wamira fitted with an F119 engine to make this idea an irresistible submission to the Australian government.

  7. #27

    Quote Originally Posted by Gubler, A. View Post
    LOL. You just need some bar charts and a graphic of the AAC Wamira fitted with an F119 engine to make this idea an irresistible submission to the Australian government.
    Of course. Fitting an F119 engine will require nothing more than a "few sheet metal changes" and provide a supercruising capability to our Wamira's. Their Super Tucano's won't stand a chance!

  8. #28

    RI studies F-16 offer

    The Jakarta Post | Fri, 11/12/2010 10:42 AM | National

    JAKARTA: Indonesian Military chief Adm. Agus Suhartono said he has been studying an offer of two squadrons of F-16 A/B Fighting Falcon fighter jets from the US.

    He said although it was a grant, he had to calculate the cost of maintaining the 24 aircraft. Indonesia-US ties were also a consideration, he said as quoted by Antara news agency.

    The Obama administration lifted the military embargo on Indonesia in July due to “improvement on human rights”. The embargo was levied more than a decade ago after repeated human rights abuses in Timor Leste perpetrated by the Indonesian Military.

    Budget concerns forced Indonesia to refuse an earlier US government offer of a newer model of Fighting Falcon, the F-16 C/D.

    Indonesian Air Force chief of staff Air Marshal Eri Biatmoko said the military needed three squadrons of fighter jets for air security. — JP

  9. #29

    Legislators will support government F-16 grant decision

    The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | Thu, 11/18/2010 1:20 PM | National

    The House’s commission on defense will support the government as officials evaluate whether or not to accept a US grant for free F-16 jet fighters, a legislator says.

    “If the government, based on the study, decides that it is not appropriate to accept the grant, we will accept its decision,” House Commission I legislator Nurhayati Ali Assegaf said on Thursday, as reported by Antara news agency.

    The grant must not burden the state budget, she said, adding that the government should purchase new aircraft if the budget allowed.

    Nurhayati said Indonesia needed fighter aircraft to guard its territory and aircraft carriers to support humanitarian missions during disasters. *cough* *splutter*

    Shhhhhhh don't tell APA! Floppsy and the other Idiots will use it as another excuse to rebirth the Pig...............

    A bad use of English here, what they are talking about are the cheap-ish Korean-built, LPD's that they have already bought one or two of...........

  10. #30

    Quote Originally Posted by buglerbilly View Post
    RI studies F-16 offer

    The Jakarta Post | Fri, 11/12/2010 10:42 AM | National

    JAKARTA: Indonesian Military chief Adm. Agus Suhartono said he has been studying an offer of two squadrons of F-16 A/B Fighting Falcon fighter jets from the US.

    He said although it was a grant, he had to calculate the cost of maintaining the 24 aircraft. Indonesia-US ties were also a consideration, he said as quoted by Antara news agency.

    The Obama administration lifted the military embargo on Indonesia in July due to “improvement on human rights”. The embargo was levied more than a decade ago after repeated human rights abuses in Timor Leste perpetrated by the Indonesian Military.

    Budget concerns forced Indonesia to refuse an earlier US government offer of a newer model of Fighting Falcon, the F-16 C/D.

    Indonesian Air Force chief of staff Air Marshal Eri Biatmoko said the military needed three squadrons of fighter jets for air security. — JP
    We can't afford to operate 34x F-16's, (the CHEAPEST 4th Gen fighter to operate!) Clearly the ONLY option then is to acquire 8x Super Tucanos and 180x Flankers...

    Obviously therefore, Australia is doomed...


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