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Thread: RAN News

  1. #11

    DATE:22/07/10

    SOURCE:Flight Daily News

    Lockheed Martin/Sikorsky to submit Australia MH60R proposal


    By Siva Govindasamy

    The Lockheed Martin/Sikorsky team will submit its proposal for Australia's multi-mission helicopter requirement on Friday, and expects a decision to be made in the first quarter of 2011.

    Their MH-60R is up against the NH Industries NH-90 in the 24-helicopter requirement, which is estimated to cost up to $2.1 billion. "We are very confident about our chances in this competition," says Leonard Wengler, vice-president for navy programmes at Sikorsky.

    There is a little more uncertainty about India's naval helicopters competition. The MH-60R team submitted their proposal more than a year ago, but there has been no news since from New Delhi and it is still not clear if the requirement exists. The helicopter is up against the NH-90 there as well.

    South Korea and the United Arab Emirates have submitted a letter of request for the MH-60R, while Denmark is expected to shortly begin a search to fulfill its requirement for naval multi-mission helicopters.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    Currently an ANZAC class frigate in the floating forgnac dock up here.

    All the sides of the ship have been covered in shade cloth where they protrude above the walls of the dock.

  3. #13

    HMAS Melbourne Commences Operations in the Gulf

    (Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued September 8, 2010)

    The first of the newly upgraded Adelaide Class Guided Missile Frigates (FFG), HMAS Melbourne, has commenced maritime security operations in the Middle East, replacing the ANZAC Class Frigate (FFH) HMAS Parramatta.

    HMAS Melbourne, now under the command of Commander Michael Harris, with an embarked Ship’s Company of 230, returns to the Middle East following previous missions in 2002 and 2004. She now boasts new missile and torpedo systems as part of the extensive capability enhancements provided by the FFG upgrade project.

    Chief of Joint Operations, Lieutenant General Mark Evans, said that the men and women of the Royal Australian Navy provide essential naval support to coalition maritime security operations and the international effort to counter terrorism and piracy in the region.

    “The work that our Navy people do is vital in strengthening maritime security in the Gulf of Aden and the environment around the Horn of Africa, and I have no doubt that the ship’s company of HMAS Melbourne will rise to the challenge and continue the good work already completed by HMAS Parramatta,” Lieutenant General Evans said.

    Parramatta, commanded by Commander Heath Robertson, completed a successful six month rotation of maritime security operations and will return to her home base in Sydney next week.

    Melbourne’s Operation SLIPPER deployment is the 24th to the Middle East Area of Operations undertaken by a ship of the Australian Navy.

    -ends-

  4. #14

    HMA Ships Manoora and Kanimbla Alongside for Maintenance

    (Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Sept. 27, 2010)

    Information provided to the Chief of Navy by the Landing Platform Amphibious (LPA) Sea Worthiness Board, an independent body that provides robust governance advice to the Chief of Navy, about platform sea-worthiness and potential risks associated with operating the ship class has resulted in an “operational pause” being initiated for the Navy’s two LPAs, HMA Ships Manoora and Kanimbla.

    The Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Russ Crane AO, CSM, RAN, said while the decision to keep both ships alongside is precautionary, the safety of those on board must come first.

    “Our LPAs are a key element of Navy capability, but if their operation has potential to impact on safety then this must be addressed quickly and openly,” VADM Crane said.

    Specialist engineers and the Navy’s Sea Training Group will now carry out a closer inspection of each ship’s engineering systems, maintenance arrangements and general condition, to ensure that they can be operated safely and effectively to meet national requirements.

    “We will make every effort to get both ships back to sea as soon as possible,” Vice Admiral Crane said. “But we won’t be cutting corners. While I acknowledge the significant effort to improve the state of the LPAs during 2010, the ships will now remain alongside until I am convinced potential problems highlighted by the LPA Sea-Worthiness Board have been addressed.”

    The operational pause is not related to the recent small fire on board HMAS Kanimbla. That incident remains under separate investigation.

    HMA Ships Manoora and Kanimbla will remain alongside in Sydney until given the all clear.

    -ends-

  5. #15

    Hmmn, that could put a dent in the plans for Ex HAMEL. How are we supposed to go across the beach now?

  6. #16
    Supreme Overlord ARH v.4.0's Avatar
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    Swim.
    Repent!

    The darkest hour of Humanity is upon us. The world
    shall meet it's end and we shall be submerged into a
    new dark age. Repent your sins, for the apocalypse,
    and the end, is extremely f@#king nigh!

  7. #17

    Quote Originally Posted by buglerbilly View Post
    HMA Ships Manoora and Kanimbla Alongside for Maintenance

    (Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Sept. 27, 2010)

    Information provided to the Chief of Navy by the Landing Platform Amphibious (LPA) Sea Worthiness Board, an independent body that provides robust governance advice to the Chief of Navy, about platform sea-worthiness and potential risks associated with operating the ship class has resulted in an “operational pause” being initiated for the Navy’s two LPAs, HMA Ships Manoora and Kanimbla.



    HMA Ships Manoora and Kanimbla will remain alongside in Sydney until given the all clear.

    -ends-
    These two ships have been the real workhorses of the RAN since they were introduced.
    While they have been invaluable to the Navy and the ADF generally, they are, to borrow a phrase from elsewhere, running on a wing and a prayer.
    The new LHD's are desperately needed as the LPA's are virtually worn out.
    They could be alongside for a very long time.
    MB

  8. #18

    Swim.
    'Tis very hard to swim with a 15 tonne armoured vehicle under your arm.

  9. #19

    Quote Originally Posted by Milne Bay View Post
    These two ships have been the real workhorses of the RAN since they were introduced.
    While they have been invaluable to the Navy and the ADF generally, they are, to borrow a phrase from elsewhere, running on a wing and a prayer.
    The new LHD's are desperately needed as the LPA's are virtually worn out.
    They could be alongside for a very long time.
    MB
    All the more reason to pick up one of the BAY class LPD's that are bound to be disposed of by the Brits..................available immediately, low mileage, heaps of seatime left before the next major overhaul, covers all of our basic needs

  10. #20

    The solution to the problem is to have never brought the LPAs in the first place. If the Government had ordered a THSS (ie new build LPD) in 93 when they should have it could have been available for East Timor, provided a lot more capability and provided a much more useful life than 10 years. It could have also provided a basis for a class of three ships acquired during 2000-10 rather than waiting for 2 LHDs in 2012-15. The LPA is clealty better than nothing but was always a not much from worst option for this capability. Of course the initial decision in 93 was based on spending less money which resulted in more money having to be spent and less capability delivered a lot later than when really needed.

    Interestingly five years ago I spoke to the CO of Tobruk who laughed at the idea that the Rat would be first amphib to decomission as the LHDs were delivered. He said there was a lot more life in his ship than the LPAs and it was better suited to the sealift role anyway.

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