+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 203
1 2 3 11 51 101 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 2023

Thread: RAN News

  1. #1

    RAN News

    Government Reforms to Naval Ship Repair Sector

    (Source: Australian Department of Defense; issued June 24, 2010)

    The Federal Government has today announced significant reforms to the naval ship repair sector, announcing those industry entities that will be invited to tender for long-term contracts for the repair & maintenance of Navy’s major fleet units.

    Greg Combet, Minister for Defence Materiel and Science, said this initiative will provide industry and Navy with greater certainty and stability in the repair and maintenance of the Navy's major fleet units through the use of long-term, performance-based contracts.

    “These reforms will provide business with greater certainty, workers in the industry with greater job security and will play a key role in the delivery and support of naval capability,” Mr Combet said.

    The industry entities that will be invited to participate in the respective Request for Tender processes are:

    -- For the group comprising HMA Ships Success, Manoora, Kanimbla and Tobruk: ASP Ship Management, BAE Systems, KBR/Rolls Royce, Babcock/UGL Infrastructure, Forgacs/Teekay, Thales, and DMS Maritime/Transfield;

    -- For the group comprising the four Adelaide Class frigates: BAE Systems, KBR/Rolls Royce, Thales, and DMS Maritime/Transfield;

    -- For the group comprising the eight ANZAC Class frigates: BAE Systems, Babcock/UGL Infrastructure, Thales, and DMS Maritime/Transfield.”

    Mr Combet congratulated the successful entities, adding that this initiative offers the opportunity to further transform Australia’s naval ship repair sector.

    “It will provide Industry with greater certainty of work effort, thereby providing incentive to develop the workforce and invest in necessary infrastructure.

    “In so doing, Defence will realise lower costs in the repair and maintenance of its major fleet units,” Mr Combet said.

    -ends-

  2. #2

    Collins Class Submarines Training in Undersea Warfare

    (Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued July 7, 2010)


    Two of the Royal Australian Navy’s Collins-class submarines, HMAS Dechaineux and HMAS Waller, on ASW exercises off the West Australian coast. (Australian DoD photo)

    Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Collins Class submarines have been captured in impressive imagery, whilst exercising off the West Australian coast recently.

    HMAS Collins, HMAS Dechaineux and HMAS Waller have been involved in an extensive training exercise which has tested both the crews and submarines. Imagery available shows two of the submarines conducting early morning activities just off Garden Island.

    The exercise encompassed a number of military assets including RAN frigate HMAS Anzac, three RAN Seahawk helicopters from the Nowra based 816 Squadron and a Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) P3 Orion. These units were taking part in order to expose all participants to a variety of challenging and complex anti-submarine warfare scenarios.

    Commander Australian Fleet, Rear Admiral Steve Gilmore said these types of exercises, involving multiple units are vital in ensuring that our war fighting skills and competencies in the under-sea environment are maintained at the highest level.

    “The exercise provided appropriate challenge to all who were involved, and was conducted with the utmost professionalism,” said Rear Admiral Gilmore.

    “Activities such as these ensure our people and platforms remain at the highest level of readiness in the defence of Australia.”

    -ends-

  3. #3

    NEWS RELEASE

    On the web: http://www.dsca.mil Media/Public Contact: (703) 601-3859

    Transmittal No. 10-37

    Australia – MH-60R Multi-Mission Helicopters

    WASHINGTON, July 9, 2010 – The Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress July 7 of a possible Foreign Military Sale to Australia of 24 MH-60R SEAHAWK Multi-Mission Helicopters and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support for an estimated cost of $2.1 billion.

    The Government of Australia has requested a possible sale of 24 MH-60R SEAHAWK Multi-Mission Helicopters, 60 T-700 GE 401C Engines (48 installed and 12 spares), communication equipment, support equipment, spare and repair parts, tools and test equipment, technical data and publications, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. government and contractor engineering, technical, and logistics support services. The estimated cost is $2.1 billion.

    Australia is one of our most important allies in the Western Pacific. The strategic location of this political and economic power contributes significantly to ensuring peace and economic stability in the region. Australia’s efforts in peacekeeping and humanitarian operations in Iraq and in Afghanistan have served U.S. national security interests. This proposed sale is consistent with those objectives and facilitates burden sharing with our allies.

    The proposed sale of the MH-60R SEAHAWK helicopters will improve Australia’s anti-submarine and surface warfare capability and provide an improved search and rescue and anti-ship surveillance capability. Australia will also use the enhanced capability in future contingency operations encompassing humanitarian assistance, disaster relief, and stability operations in the Asia-Pacific region. Australia will have no difficulty absorbing these additional helicopters into its armed forces.

    The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

    The prime contractors are Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation in Stratford, Connecticut, Lockheed Martin in Owego, New York, General Electric in Lynn, Massachusetts, and Raytheon Corporation in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

    Implementation of this proposed sale will require the assignment of ten contractor representatives to Australia to support delivery of the MH-60R helicopters.

    There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

    This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Newcastle, NSW
    Posts
    123

    Wonder how many years support the $2.1 Billion would include.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    308

    I wonder if that means it'll be purchased without competition. Given the required timetable and the low-risk nature of the MH-60R, I wouldn't be surprised.

  6. #6

    There is a competition underway, but I should imagine the engine problems that have grounded the MRH-90's would not be helping the European offer.

  7. #7

    Quote Originally Posted by Deks View Post
    I wonder if that means it'll be purchased without competition. Given the required timetable and the low-risk nature of the MH-60R, I wouldn't be surprised.
    From most of the info I have read on this matter i thought a competition [2 way] was definately required, the proposal did say "possible sale" anyhow my own opinion is that the MH60R is the best bet & I think many others [not all] felt the same on other threads regarding this matter.
    Tiddles

  8. #8

    The FMS application needs to be lodged in advance of the decision on the helicopter. There is still a competition underway, and this doesn't hint at anything, one way or the other. It does however tell us that you can buy 24 MH-60R for US$2.1bn with 60 engines, which is really fairly cheap. Be interesting to see what the total package comes to (i.e. the aircraft plus the spares and support) and how that compares to the NH-90 NFH.

  9. #9

    The Government first pass decision announced earlier this year (in the budget from memory) was quite specific: competition between a commercial offer from Australian Aerospace (NH-90 NFH) and an FMS offer from the US Navy (MH-60R). The DSCA Congressional announcement is part and parcel of the FMS requirement. Right now AusAero will be sweeting dollops hoping they can offer the NH-90 to the RAN’s spec (including TLS) for less than USD 2 billion. It would appear from their public relations efforts that the only way they can do this is to offer less than 24 helicopters, claiming they can meet the RAN’s needs with less.

  10. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by Gubler, A. View Post
    The Government first pass decision announced earlier this year (in the budget from memory) was quite specific: competition between a commercial offer from Australian Aerospace (NH-90 NFH) and an FMS offer from the US Navy (MH-60R). The DSCA Congressional announcement is part and parcel of the FMS requirement. Right now AusAero will be sweeting dollops hoping they can offer the NH-90 to the RAN’s spec (including TLS) for less than USD 2 billion. It would appear from their public relations efforts that the only way they can do this is to offer less than 24 helicopters, claiming they can meet the RAN’s needs with less.
    Of course they may present the case that the NH-90 NFH will be assembled in Australia with all of the associated benefits to Australian employment and the economy as well.
    There is also the substantial/partial (?) commonality with the NH-90's already being introduced into service.
    This would possibly justify a higher price tag because of the side benefits.
    Interesting.
    When is a decision due?
    MB

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts