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Thread: All Terrain and High Mobility Vehicles

  1. #11

    Ares

    A Defense Technology Blog

    French Army Gets Aravis


    Posted by Christina Mackenzie at 2/4/2010 8:35 AM CST



    The French army has taken delivery of the first four heavily protected Aravis vehicles out of the 15 ordered in a €20 million contract from manufacturer Nexter Systems. Crew and maintenance personnel will start training on these vehicles immediately.

    The Aravis is a 4-wheel drive, 12.5 ton air-transportable vehicle which is heavily protected against mines and IEDs. It can carry up to 7 fully-equipped personnel, has a small turret with a 12.7mm gun and has seven cameras on the outside so that those inside can see the environment immediately surrounding the vehicle.

    Aravis are designed for reconnaissance missions and will be used by the units in Afghanistan which operate the Buffalo and Souvim anti-improvised explosive device (IED) vehicles.

    The remaining 11 vehicles will be delivered before the end of April.

    photo credit: Nexter Systems

  2. #12

    Quote Originally Posted by buglerbilly View Post
    Ares

    A Defense Technology Blog

    French Army Gets Aravis


    Posted by Christina Mackenzie at 2/4/2010 8:35 AM CST



    The French army has taken delivery of the first four heavily protected Aravis vehicles out of the 15 ordered in a €20 million contract from manufacturer Nexter Systems. Crew and maintenance personnel will start training on these vehicles immediately.

    The Aravis is a 4-wheel drive, 12.5 ton air-transportable vehicle which is heavily protected against mines and IEDs. It can carry up to 7 fully-equipped personnel, has a small turret with a 12.7mm gun and has seven cameras on the outside so that those inside can see the environment immediately surrounding the vehicle.

    Aravis are designed for reconnaissance missions and will be used by the units in Afghanistan which operate the Buffalo and Souvim anti-improvised explosive device (IED) vehicles.

    The remaining 11 vehicles will be delivered before the end of April.

    photo credit: Nexter Systems
    Talk about reinventing the wheel, for a small order. It can carry 7 against the Bushmasters 10, "'anti-blast device", V-shaped anti-mine plates and a spall liner with the crew citadel. Not an Monocoque all-welded steel hull and is based on the light truck chassis Mecedes-Benz U-5000, with no better protection than the Dutch version of the Bushmaster.

    Full spec's from this site
    http://www.armyrecognition.com/frenc...ti-functi.html

    Cheers

  3. #13

    but it is the French tho, dont they have to be different with everything? (o;

  4. #14



    Victoria's tragic Black Saturday fires have been the catalyst for some potentially life-saving inventions.

    INTERESTING LOOKING.............

    Liam Ferguson, who helped his family to save their home in the Latrobe Valley, has drawn on his experiences to design the Amatoya, an off-road fire reconnaissance vehicle.

    The 24-year-old designer devised the Amatoya for his honours-year project at Monash University. It can penetrate rugged terrain to provide assessments of fire movements and withstand being engulfed by a blaze.

    The Amatoya has a seat for the driver and one for an operator to remotely control two heavy-duty water cannons on the roof. It has a water supply of 1800 litres. A thermal-imaging camera would help the crew to identify fire hot-spots.

  5. #15

    Ares

    A Defense Technology Blog

    M-ATVs Need More Armor, Pentagon Pays Up


    Posted by Paul McLeary at 2/8/2010 12:38 PM CST


    SecDef Gates standing in front of an M-ATV (Pic: Dept. of Defense)

    Oshkosh has signed contracts worth some $4 billion and counting to supply over 6,600 of its “MRAP light” M-ATVs – which military officials say is desperately needed to traverse the unpaved roads of Afghanistan — to Army units whose hulking MRAPs sometimes prove too heavy to navigate the Afghan terrain.

    Four billion, even in the realm of today’s increasingly bloated defense budgets, is still some serious money, but money well-spent if the M-ATV proves its worth in combat. Lighter by several thousand pounds than the average MRAP, the big selling point for the vehicle was that it was both lighter than the MRAP while offering similar protection.

    But how much lighter is it really going to be?

    Oshkosh Corp. announced today that it has inked a deal with the U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command Life Cycle Management Command to supply more than 625 add-on armor kits for its M-ATV in an order worth more than $84 million. The deal brings the total awards the company has won to $107 million for more than 795 EFP kits. This begs the question: are all M-ATVs going to need these bolt-on kits? If so, how much does this add to the overall cost of the program?

    Secretary of Defense Gates sure sounded like he wanted to order up even more M-ATVs during his budget briefings last week, and I would be surprised if the number of trucks capped out at its current 6,600 level. If all of these trucks received the extra armor—even if the number stayed at 6,600—that would mean about $800 million more dollars tacked on to the program. And all this is after the Pentagon has already spent close to $30 billion on an MRAP program it plans on mothballing after the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan wind down.

    The kits Oshkosh is providing are useful, and necessary, given the threats they will soon face in Afghanistan. According to the company,

    The order calls for Oshkosh to provide explosively formed penetrator (EFP) protection kits for the tactical vehicle that is currently being shipped to Afghanistan, with delivery of the kits expected to begin in April 2010 and be completed by the end of August 2010. The kits will include EFP armor, base door armor and a door-assist mechanism.

    In the release, the company said that its TAK-4 independent suspension system “allows the M-ATV to accept add-on armor while maintaining its agile maneuverability and a full payload capacity of up to 4,000 pounds.”

    Add-on armor kits have become the order of the day, with everything from MRAPs to Humvees to Strykers to Bradleys to now, M-ATVs receiving bolt-on kits in theater. But they also add weight while driving up the advertised cost of the vehicle. It will be interesting to see how much, and how many, the M-ATV will receive.

    Sorry Mr McLeary, I like a lot of what you write about BUT on this occasion you have failed to identify the fact that the MATV has always been designed for add-on armour and the armour itelf has always been deemed necessary for certain tactical conditions. Obviously current events in Helmand province are such conditions one would have thought IF one bothered to think!

  6. #16

    Ares

    A Defense Technology Blog

    Pros and Cons of Strykers in Afghanistan


    Posted by Paul McLeary at 2/10/2010 11:38 AM CST

    In July 2009, the 5th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, replaced Canadian forces in the Arghandab valley in Afghanistan’s Kandahar province, and by the end of the year the mission had already taken its toll: more than 30 had been killed and over two dozen Strykers severely damaged due to roadside bombs. The 1st Battalion, 17th Regiment alone lost 21 men, with dozens more wounded.

    The Army Times’ Sean Naylor embedded with the 1/17 in the fall, finding discontent in the ranks and a popular company commander relieved from command, in a blockbuster piece of wartime reporting that showed what General McChrystal’s counterinsurgency guidance looked like once it hit the ground, and how commanders interpreted the general’s orders in the thick of the fight.

    But questions of strategy aside—or as some might say, counterinsurgency tactics masquerading as strategy—the question remains, after so much success in Iraq is the Stryker running up against its limitations in Afghanistan? I've got a piece in the February issue of DTI looking at the issue.

    David E. Johnson of the Rand Corp., a specialist on military transformation, told me that “I think Stryker is perfectly appropriate for some places we go,” but “I don’t think it’s particularly designed to function well in Afghanistan—it’s really an infantry carrier that is useful in situations where you’re facing a fairly low level of violence, or with an enemy of relatively unsophisticated means. I think it’s going to be a problem in Afghanistan mainly because of terrain and because of the weapons we’re finding there.”

    That said, Strykers have gained a lot of fans in the Pentagon over the past several years, and the Army is shedding two Heavy Brigades in favor of Stryker Brigades over the next couple of years. “Strykers are going to be with us for a while,” concludes Dean Lockwood, a weapons analyst at Forecast International. “With the size of some of the IEDs they’re getting, it wouldn’t matter if it was a Stryker, an MRAP or an Abrams tank—they’re going to be destroyed.” He also notes that much of Afghanistan’s unpaved terrain is “rifle and rucksack country that is not a place for vehicles, but everyone wants to use [Strykers] because of the connectivity that they’ve got with the communications package. I think it’s more an issue of how they’re being employed rather than the vehicles themselves.”

    There's much more over at DTI.

    http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/gener...han%20Strykers

  7. #17

    Image Reports from the recent International Armoured Vehicles Expo held in London



    The MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) made its international debut at the International Armored Vehicles exhibition. The display was in accordance with the Pentagon's plan to offer MRAP and M-ATV vehicles to allied forces, taking part in the ISAF coalition operations in Afghanistan.



    Oshkosh also brought the new SandCat to London; the high-speed, highly-protected, highly-maneuverable vehicle that can be specifically configured to fulfill a variety of roles in any type of mission. The SandCat is tailored to meet operational environments, giving the perfect balance of mission performance, protection and payload to meet rigorous demands.



    Sandcat - originally designed by Plasan, is being marketed by Oshkosh as a command and utility armored vehicle.
    (They've just recently gotten small orders for this vehicle)



    Iveco brought an enhanced and improved version of the Light Modular Vehicle (LMV), currently operational with several military forces in Afghanistan.



    Iveco designed the LMV as a light and versatile command and liaison vehicle. The current version is heavier and more protected, adapted to more demanding roles.



    Total Mobility Vehicle is unveiling at the International Armored Vehicles a new family of vehicles designed for extreme off-road mobility. Known as the TMV 6x6M, the off-road utility vehicle is the first of a series of such vehicles, designed for military applications. A civil configuration is also in development.



    The TMV 6x6M has an armour-clad, fully enclosed "bath tub" hull that houses all major components, offering significantly greater protection from mines and IEDs than conventional vehicles. Additional protection to the crew and passengers is provided by a composite cab and composite rear pod for troop carrying applications. the vehicle is designed to provide high levels of protection against ballistic threats.

    © Copyright 2010 - Defense Update, Online Holdings International.

  8. #18

    U.S. Army Upholds Oshkosh's FMTV Award

    By KATE BRANNEN

    Published: 12 Feb 2010 18:51

    The U.S. Army has decided that Oshkosh will keep its $3 billion contract for the Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV), the company announced today.


    The U.S. Army has upheld its award of FMTV (Family of Medium Tactical Trucks) to Oshkosh. (OSHKOSH DEFENSE)

    BAE Systems and Navistar both filed protests after the contract was awarded last August. The selection of Oshkosh unseated BAE Systems as the provider of the armored trucks.

    After the protests were filed, the bids of all three competitors for the FMTV program were reviewed by the by the Government Accountability Office, which recommended the Army re-evaluate the bids using new scoring.

    The Army reviewed the bids and made the decision to uphold its contract with Oshkosh. It also canceled the Sept. 4 stop-work order it had issued, Oshkosh said.

    "We are very pleased the Army affirmed its original decision that Oshkosh Corporation's FMTV bid clearly represents the best overall value for the Army, the taxpayers and the Warfighter," said Robert G. Bohn, Oshkosh chairman and chief executive officer, in a written statement.

    The FMTV re-buy program is a five-year, firm fixed-price requirements contract for the production of up to 23,000 vehicles and trailers, as well as support services and engineering, the company said.

  9. #19

    International Armoured Vehicles 2010

    More shots from the show via Army Recognition..............

    The new truck/utility fro TMV, looks a beast but no idea of the background and support behind this company............


  10. #20

    TMV Limited 6x6M high mobility military transport vehicle

    General information

    The TMV 6x6M is new lightweight wheeled military trucks 6x6 designed and manufactured by the British Company TMV Limited. The rapidly-changing marketplace, with a continually-evolving insurgent threat, has given birth to the unique, six-wheel drive, six-wheel steer, TMV 6x6M. This, the first in a line of British-designed, purpose-built vehicles from TMV, focuses on the logistical requirement for highly-manoeuvrable military transport weighing up to eight tonnes GVW. Significantly, the modular design concept enables product extension to 4x4 and 8x8 variants. The vehicle is scheduled for production in early 2011, following extensive field trials, with 4x4 and 8x8 variants to follow. By nature of time constraints and practicality, the majority of current vehicle solutions in this category have had to be based on existing chassis technologies, adapted for purpose. As such, they are inevitably compromised in certain aspects. Furthermore, continually-changing deployment requirements focus on the need to deliver multiple assets with low utilisation rates and a high logistic footprint and, in answer to the insurgent threat, a fresh approach to both ballistic and blast protection.

    Variants :

    Some variants in prototype version, available in 4x4 and 8x8 configuration.

    Technical data

    Armament
    At this time, the prototype version is not armed, but we can suppose that the TMV 6x6M can be armed for his self-protection.
    Protection

    The TMV 6x6M is equipped with an armour-clad, fully enclosed "bath tub" hull that houses all major components, offering significantly greater protection from mines and IEDs than conventional vehicles. Additional protection to the crew and passengers is provided by a composite cab and composite rear pod for troop carrying applications. the vehicle is designed to provide high levels of protection against ballistic threats. The TMV 6x6M is based on established aerospace and racing car construction principles, features a structural V-shaped tub chassis of stainless steel, entirely clad with blast plate, to provide enhanced levels of protection against mines and IEDs, married to the usage of new generation, high-technology construction materials.

    Propulsion
    The TMV 6x6M is powered by a Cummins ISBe5 in-line four-cylinder, 4,500cc turbocharged, water-cooled diesel engine, with a power output of 147 kilowatts (200bhp), generating up to 900Nm of torque. This enables a limited top speed of 85mph/137 kph, combined with first-class dynamic performance and driveability. Internal diesel fuel tanks enable a typical vehicle range of 700 miles/1,120 kilometres. High power-to-weight ratio, coupled to permanent six-wheel-drive and adaptive six-wheel-steer configuration, ensure a very high degree of on-road and off-road performance, with excellent manoeuvrability and approach/ departure angles (52% and 50% respectively), due to minimal front and rear overhang. Fully-independent air suspension ensures passenger comfort, and adjustable ride height allows the centre of gravity to be kept low for higher speed use, but crucially allows the vehicle to ride higher when a mine or IED threat is anticipated.

    Accessories
    The six-wheel steer system is adaptive, and can be programmed to allow touch-button change of steering configuration per axle, according to specific needs in the field. All TMV 6x6M controls and instrumentation are integral within a single multi-functional electronic module mounted on the vehicle dashboard. A menu-based system allows touch-button access and scroll-through adjustment of all major dynamic functions of the vehicle, together with a default electronic instrument display when in normal drive mode.

    Specifications

    Armament
    No weapons at this time

    Country users
    United Kingdom prototype

    Designer Company
    TMV Limited

    Accessories

    Adjustable suspension, single multi-functional electronic module for the vehicle controls and instrumentation
    Crew: 2 soldiers
    Armor: STANAG 3 ballistic, STANAG 2 blast.
    Weight: 7,500 kg
    Speed: 137 km/h maximum speed on road
    Range: 1,126 km

    Dimensions
    Lenght, 5,7 m; Width, 2,1 m; Height, 2,23 m






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