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Thread: China’s Navy Gets Its Act Together, and Gets Aggressive

  1. #401

    Chinese shipbuilder launches defence innovation centre

    Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Industry

    03 March 2017

    The China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC) has inaugurated a new facility that promotes innovation in marine-defence technologies, the state-owned company has announced.

    CSIC said on 1 March that the 'science and technology industrial marine defence innovation centre' would respond to China's "national security and strategic requirements".

    The shipbuilder added that the innovation centre will be run in co-ordination with the State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry (SASTIND) - China's primary defence industrial agency - and focus on several priority activities.

    These include "top-level" marine defence technology planning and design, to carry out marine defence research and development (R&D) and related security assessments, and to draw up a marine defence science and technology industrial development plan.

    (116 of 371 words)

  2. #402

    Quote Originally Posted by buglerbilly View Post
    Chinese shipbuilder launches defence innovation centre

    Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Industry

    03 March 2017

    The China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC) has inaugurated a new facility that promotes innovation in marine-defence technologies, the state-owned company has announced.

    CSIC said on 1 March that the 'science and technology industrial marine defence innovation centre' would respond to China's "national security and strategic requirements".

    The shipbuilder added that the innovation centre will be run in co-ordination with the State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry (SASTIND) - China's primary defence industrial agency - and focus on several priority activities.

    These include "top-level" marine defence technology planning and design, to carry out marine defence research and development (R&D) and related security assessments, and to draw up a marine defence science and technology industrial development plan.

    (116 of 371 words)
    They must have already stolen everything that the west has to offer, and Russia is much harder to steal from.......
    - oh wait... where did those SU27 clones and their chinese spinoffs come from.......?
    Steal Russian ship plans .... weeeeeeellllllll ....... no thanks......
    MB

  3. #403
    Senior Member
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    The Chinese LCS clone got all the news coverage so I am still waiting for the other models to show up in the news more prominantly! At least new to me ...
    • a new enlarged Type 22 Trimaran FAC coming in at 55m and 6oot displacement
    • last years LY-80N naval VLS together with the land launcher and its new AESA radar
    • a stealth missile attack craft with stealth cupola similar to the 76mm by Oto Melara for the main gun and generally more similar to the design of the Visby-Class

  4. #404

    China to bolster size and strength of navy, say reports

    Andrew Tate, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

    08 March 2017

    China will increase the size of the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) and strengthen it further by both expanding its personnel and improving its vessels, according to media reports.

    This plan is to "safeguard the country's maritime rights and promote its maritime interests", Liu Xiaojiang, the former political commissar of the PLAN, was quoted by the state-owned Global Times newspaper as saying on 5 March.

    The retired admiral and now deputy head of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the National People's Congress (NPC) - China's top legislature - said on the sidelines of the fifth session of the 12th NPC that the navy's role is growing, which has driven plans to increase the number of personnel in the service, improve its ships, and "build a larger navy roster".

    (151 of 562 words)

  5. #405

    March 9 2017 - 7:06PM

    Chinese naval ships close to Australia? 'Get used to it', experts warn

    David Wroe



    Chinese warships have carried out naval drills in Australia's maritime backyard for the third time in three years in a move that experts say strengthens the case for greater co-operation with Indonesia.


    China's missile destroyer Haikou, which took part in the exercises, in 2014.*Photo: Zheng Wenhao

    China's state media have reported that two missile destroyers and a supply ship conducted combat exercises during a 25-day voyage that took them close to Australia's Christmas Island.

    The People's Liberation Army Navy made major headlines in early 2014 when they carried out similar drills in the eastern Indian Ocean close to Australian territory for the first time. This was followed by anti-piracy exercises close to Christmas Island in May last year.

    It is understood the Australia Defence Force monitored the latest Chinese activities and the ships' passage between Indonesian Java and Christmas Island.

    Experts said that Australia needed to get used to a greater Chinese naval presence in seas to its immediate north and west, which in turn would demand more maritime surveillance including in co-operation with Indonesia.

    Rory Medcalf, head of the national security college at the Australian National University, said the latest drills showed that Beijing's "maritime silk road" initiative of creating global sea corridors was "much more than an economic initiative" but also had a military dimension.

    "It confirms that the Chinese navy is going to get into the habit of substantial deployments to the Indian Ocean on a regular basis and that the Chinese navy recognises the great strategic significance of the waters near the Sunda Strait and Australia's Christmas Island," Professor Medcalf said.

    "This in turn confirms the need for Australia to deepen its investment in maritime surveillance close to our Indian Ocean territories."

    He said the fact that China had carried out the combat, counter-terrorism and anti-piracy drills on its own rather than in partnership with other countries in the region meant*"it looks like China is choosing the unilateral path, which can only raise the security anxieties of others in the region".

    He added that the latest drills also showed "the importance of strengthening maritime co-operation with Indonesia so we can share an operating picture with them of what's happening" – a view shared by other analysts.

    Euan Graham of the Lowy Institute said Australia's new acquisitions such as P-8 Poseidon aircraft and Triton drones would allow greater maritime monitoring. Meanwhile the hardware the PLA Navy was building such as fast attack missile craft and huge logistics vessels showed a growing ambition to operate in waters well beyond its near region.

    Malcolm Davis of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute said that China was "going to deploy naval force into our backyard on a more regular basis".

    "We can't ignore that. We're going to have to start responding to it, not in an aggressive way but definitely in maritime awareness. We want to keep track of what's happening out there."

    The analysts all said that China's greatest strategic interest in familiarising its navy with these waters is that in the event of a crisis or conflict its adversaries would likely blockade the Malacca Strait on which China depends for energy supplies.

    The Sunda and Lombok straits are the natural alternative route if the Malacca Strait is impassable to Chinese vessels.

  6. #406

    China's Second Aircraft Carrier in Shape as Navy Sets Ambitious Goals

    (Source: ECNS.CN; issued March 10, 2017)


    China’s second carrier, with a displacement of 50,000 tonnes, is slowly taking shape, and after having its island (pictured) fitted, its hull has now been completely assembled. (China internet photo)

    The building of China's second aircraft carrier is in good shape as the hull blocks have been joined in the dock, said a senior navy official.

    Wang Weiming, deputy chief of staff of the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy, told Xinhua on the sidelines of the annual session of the National People's Congress (NPC) that the carrier is now awaiting fitting.

    China's first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, is a refitted former Soviet Union-made carrier. The second carrier, with a displacement of 50,000 tonnes, will be a base for J-15 fighters and other aircraft, according to a Defense Ministry spokesperson who confirmed its building -- completely on China's own -- in a press briefing in December 2015.

    Wang, an NPC deputy, said the development of the marines is being accelerated, while the fleet of naval destroyers and frigates is growing bigger and stronger, and the navy will step up air and sea patrols.

    "We will intercept any intruding aircraft and follow every military vessel in areas under our responsibility," Wang said. "Our sailors should stay vigilant and be able to deal with emergencies at all times."

    Another NPC deputy Li Yanming, political commissar of the Navy's armaments department, said a first-class navy should be equipped with first-class armaments.

    He vowed better quantity, quality, scope, and functionality of naval armament manufacturing in 2017.

    A third NPC deputy Wang Huayong, deputy political commissar of the Eastern Theater Command, allayed fears surrounding China's increasing naval power.

    "Our entire forces are for defense purposes," Wang said. "The aircraft carrier is still in training and trial stage. The marines remain weak, and the number and quality of long-distance vessels do not meet expectations."

    He said China's navy is not seeking to be a bully or trying to build a force beyond a level compatible with the country's development. In fact, the military still lags behind China's current power and status, he said.

    "We have never gone to the doorstep of others to show off our military power," he said. "The construction on the South China Sea islands are mostly civilian in nature, a right bestowed by the international law."

    China's navy development contributes to a peaceful and stable world, he added.

    -ends-

  7. #407

    China Shipbuilding signs co-development deal with PLA naval university

    Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Industry

    10 March 2017

    The state-owned China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC) and the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Naval University of Engineering have signed an agreement to collaborate on military technologies, CSIC has announced.

    The accord will focus on civil-military integration, the development of naval equipment, and enhancing CSIC products for the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) said CSIC on 8 March. The corporation said the accord would seek to promote innovation in developing naval technologies and products.

    The PLA Naval University of Engineering has been credited with developing a number of systems for PLAN applications.
    In recent years the university has developed naval target recognition systems, access control systems and an electromagnetic catapult system for future aircraft carriers.

    (137 of 327 words)

  8. #408

    Rear Admiral: China Won't Stop Aircraft Carrier Development

    (Source: China Military; issued March 10, 2017)

    "China's aircraft carrier isn't a 'paper tiger', but will play a significant role in safeguarding its maritime rights and interests, " Rear Adm. Yin Zhuo, member of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) National Committee and director of the PLA Navy's Expert Consultation Committee on Cyber Security and IT Application, said in a recent TV interview.

    The website of America's The National Interest magazine published a report on March 6, which said that "according to the assessment of the Pentagon’s Defense Intelligence Agency, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Navy’s (PLAN) aircraft carriers won’t be able to conduct blue water operations in the way the US Navy’s flattops do. Nor will the PLAN have global power projection capabilities akin to those afforded by America’s fleet of supercarriers". In other words, they think "China's aircraft carriers are the ultimate paper tiger".

    In response to the assessment, Rear Adm. Yin Zhuo said that China's aircraft carriers do lag behind in combat capability, especially when comparing the carrier Liaoning with the US Navy's Nimitz-class and Ford-class aircraft carriers.

    However, Yin stressed that "in terms of maritime rights and interests, the East China Sea, South China Sea and waters around the Taiwan Strait are the most important sea areas of China's maritime rights and interests, and the Liaoning ship can play a significant role in those areas."

    According to news from the Chinese Defense Ministry, the aircraft carrier Liaoning is mainly used for scientific research, training and accumulating experience and technology for developing homemade aircraft carrier in the future, so it's not fair to compare it with American counterparts.

    In the meantime, the US has the richest experience and most advanced technology in using aircraft carrier, and its advantages today are based on nearly 100 years of accumulation. In comparison, China's aircraft carrier development started over a decade ago, and its experience in the use of aircraft carrier is even shorter. It's hard enough for it to make the current achievements.

    But, the PLA Navy never stops making progress. From December 15 to 29, 2016, the aircraft carrier Liaoning got out of the "house" and sailed across the First Island Chain for far-sea training in the West Pacific for the first time.

    During the voyage, the Liaoning carrier battle group conducted exercises in a number of subjects, including establishing the reconnaissance and early warning system, air interception, maritime attack, anti-missile and air defense.

    "From the most basic technical training like landing and takeoff to far-sea training, the aircraft carrier Liaoning is getting closer to having complete combat capability," said Yin Zhuo.

    In the development of aircraft carrier technology, China follows the steady strategy of "small but fast steps", according to which it has moved steadily from digesting and improving the Liaoning ship to building the homemade carrier as planned," said Yin.
    "China's aircraft carriers will adopt catapult-assisted take-off (C.A.T.O.) and be equipped with early warning aircraft, electronic combat aircraft, anti-submarine patrol aircraft, and modern comprehensive electronic information system. They will move from mechanized platform to IT platform," Yin stressed.

    Yin also emphasized that "China won't stop developing aircraft carrier because the PLA Navy is far from reaching the far-sea combat capability that meets China's defense needs. China will develop more aircraft carriers with better quality step by step."

    "In the near future, we'll see homemade carrier on the frontline of safeguarding China's maritime rights", Yin said.

    (ends)

    China Begins Equipment Installation on Homegrown Aircraft Carrier

    (Source: Xinhua; issued March 10, 2017)

    The major construction and design work of China's second aircraft carrier has been completed, bringing the country one step closer to establishing its own carrier fleet, according to a PLA authority.

    "The aircraft carrier's hull blocks have been joined at the shipyard, and equipment installation is currently underway," said Wang Weiming, deputy chief of staff of the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy and an NPC deputy, during a March 9 interview with Xinhua on the sidelines of the annual session of the National People's Congress. The carrier is now awaiting fitting, Wang added.

    "In addition to the existing carrier Liaoning, China will put more effort into building its own fleet of aircraft carriers. The number of China's future carriers depends on the country's strategic and military needs. We will not compete with the U.S. to build a fleet of 12 carriers, which is not necessary for China, as the country pursues a national defense policy that is purely defensive in nature," Chen Zhou, a researcher with the Academy of Military Sciences, told Beijing Youth Daily. Chen is also an NPC deputy.

    Chen's remarks came after U.S. President Donald Trump promised that he would bolster the U.S. Navy by expanding its number of carriers from 10 to 12.

    Echoing Chen, Wang Huayong, deputy political commissar of the Eastern Theater Command, attempted to allay fears surrounding China's rising naval power. He emphasized that the country's forces are for defensive purposes only.

    "The aircraft carrier is still in its training and trial stage. Marines remain weak, and the number and quality of long-distance vessels do not meet expectations," Wang told Xinhua.

    -ends-

  9. #409

    China’s First Military-Civilian Semi-Submersible Vessel Brought into Use

    (Source: China Military; issued March 15, 2017)



    QIDONG, Jiangsu Province --- China’s first 50,000-ton military-civilian dual-use semi-submersible vessel was brought into service in Qidong City, China's Jiangsu Province, on March 14.

    The 50,000-ton ship has a total length of 227 meters, with a main deck area of 7,700 square meters. Its Semi-submersible draught is 27 meters. It has an average speed of 14 knots and a maximum cruise range of 18,000 nautical miles, and is perfect for navigation and operations in the open sea.

    The semi-submersible vessel also has a large cargo platform area, equivalent to two standard football fields. In addition to its large steel structure and offshore drilling platform, the semi-submersible vessel also has other military functions, including carrying helicopters and fixing damaged war ships.

    It is reported that the semi-submersible vessel can be used for berthing transition of a big ship over 10,000 tons, maritime military relay support for ship-borne helicopters, rush-repair and evacuation of damaged warships and so on.

    Huang Hao, a deputy director of the PLA Wuxi Joint Logistic Support Center, said that the design and manufacture of this semi-submersible vessel took two years and three months.

    It is the largest civilian ship that meets defense requirements. This multi-functional semi-submersible vessel is almost the same size as an aircraft carrier, Huang added.

    -ends-

  10. #410

    More on this...................don't underestimate the import of this vessel, especially in the South China Sea

    China commissions 50,000-tonne dual-use semi-submersible

    Andrew Tate, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

    20 March 2017


    Zhen Hua 33, China's first 50,000-tonne dual-use semi-submersible, was commissioned on 14 March. Source: Via China Military Online

    China has commissioned its first heavy-lift semi-submersible to be operated as a military and civilian dual-use platform, according to the China Military Online website.

    Named Zhen Hua 33, the 50,000-tonne vessel is said to be "the largest civilian ship that meets [China's] defence requirements", and is reportedly capable of lifting ships of up to 10,000 tonnes, enabling emergency repairs or recoveries, in addition to the transport of ships, outsize cargo, and other floating structures.

    The vessel, which entered service on 14 March in Qidong, Jiangsu Province, can also be used as a flight deck for helicopter operations to achieve a joint force "maritime military relay support". Four landing spots are marked out on the cargo deck.

    Zhen Hua 33 was built at Shanghai Zhenhua Heavy Industries' Qidong Marine Engineering shipyard at the mouth of the Yangtze River and was launched in June 2016. Sea trials were completed in February 2017.

    The multipurpose ship is reported to be 227 m long, with a beam of 43 m and a normal draught of 10 m, which increases to 27 m when semi-submerged.

    Diesel engines provide the primary source of power to drive four main generators, with propulsion provided by electric motors to drive the ship at 14 kt with a range of 18,000 n miles (33,000 km). A dynamic positioning system is installed.

    In July 2015, China's People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) commissioned a smaller 20,000-tonne semi-submersible (pennant number 868), which was subsequently photographed transporting one of the service's large Zubr-class hovercraft.

    China has also built the world's second-largest semi-submersible, the 100,000-tonne Xin Guang Hua, which entered service in December 2016.

    (294 of 524 words)

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