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Thread: OPV's and other such

  1. #1

    OPV's and other such

    Sea Acceptance Trials of the Second Holland Class Patrol Vessel “Zeeland” for the Royal Netherlands Navy

    (Source: Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding; issued Sept. 1, 2011)


    Zeeland, the second of four Holland-class Ocean-going Patrol Vessels on order for the Dutch navy, leaves Vlissingen on her acceptance trials (DSNS photo)

    On Wednesday 31 August, the second of four Holland Class Oceangoing Patrol Vessels, “Zeeland” built by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding for the Royal Netherlands Navy, left Vlissingen, The Netherlands, for her sea acceptance trials (SAT).

    During the SAT, primarily the platform as well as parts of the sensor weapons and communications suite will be extensively tested. The tests will be performed by representatives of the yard in close cooperation with representatives of the Royal Netherlands Navy and the main subcontractors.

    Ocean Going Patrol Vessel

    The four vessels of the Holland Class OPV’s measure 108 metres in length and 18 metres in width with a displacement of approximately 3750 tons.

    They offer hangar space and landing facilities for one NH-90 helicopter or equivalent types. Their armament will consist of one 76 mm Oto-Melara gun, one rapid-fire 30 mm gun and two 12.7 mm Hitrole machine guns. The weapons will all have full remote control. Thanks to the state-of-the-art sensor and communication technology in the Integrated Mast Module (IMM), detection and tracking of high- and low-altitude air targets, fast boats, periscopes, mines and even swimmers will be possible.

    The first two patrol vessels, “Hr.Ms. Holland” and “’Zeeland” are built at the shipyard of Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding in Vlissingen, with a number of sections being supplied by the Damen shipyard in Galati. Hr.Ms. Holland was handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy earlier this year in May.

    The third and fourth vessels, “Groningen” en “Friesland” are built at the Damen shipyard in Galati under the supervision of Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding. Partial SAT for the Groningen are scheduled for the end of September. Hereafter she will sail to the Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding yard for final outfitting of certain systems and components.

    The Damen Shipyards Group offers a complete range of naval and patrol vessels ranging from 7 to over 200 meters. Part of this portfolio are the Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS) naval combatants and auxiliaries, embodied by the SIGMA and ENFORCER series.

    At present DSNS also has under construction for the Royal Netherlands Navy: a Joint Logistic Support Ship (JSS), the largest military vessel built by DSNS so far. For the Royal Moroccan Navy DSNS has three SIGMA Class frigates under construction.

    -ends-

  2. #2

    BB,

    http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?18...vessels/page10

    When you posted about this class in Nov. 2010 I liked the look the Holland as shown in the animation, her sister looks pretty good as a real ship.

    What do you think of the class?

    Cheers,
    Mac

  3. #3

    As OPV's they are a step and beyond most so-called OPV's and more in line with Danish thinking, sort of a half way house between a warship and what would have "normally" been called an OPV.

    I quite like them BUT then again what was supposedly originally envisaged was a pocket warship far more in line with the LCS.

    One thing that is true tho this type will be far cheaper to operate than a frigate or destroyer if not as capable a warship.

    As an anti-piracy vessel she looks pretty good but then again, my opinion, the "solution" to the reduction in piracy is not Naval but more in lines with a political solution if possible, and rampant murder if not.

  4. #4

    "and rampant murder if not"

    First I'll have a quiet chuckle to myself over a post I just made..LOL LOL LOL.

    Now to the Holland.

    Thanks for the opinion, a "pocket warship" is a very fitting description, it certainly seems more of a capable corvette than a patrol boat to me.

    Any small Navy that could not afford frigates would be pretty well served by looking at the Hollands I think, a very attractive little ship with a useful set of teeth.

    Cheers,
    Mac

  5. #5

    At least this is not a case of trying to get a quart into a pint bottle as occasionly seems to happen with Naval Designs, however with a ship about the same size as an Anzac I wondered if the usual "space & weight" for extra weapons had been provided. The ship does appear to be well enough armed for an OPV at the moment although if these vessels are used in lieu of Frigates in some places I think somthing basic like Mistral would be handy.
    Tiddles

  6. #6

    Quote Originally Posted by tiddles View Post
    At least this is not a case of trying to get a quart into a pint bottle as occasionly seems to happen with Naval Designs, however with a ship about the same size as an Anzac I wondered if the usual "space & weight" for extra weapons had been provided. The ship does appear to be well enough armed for an OPV at the moment although if these vessels are used in lieu of Frigates in some places I think somthing basic like Mistral would be handy.
    Tiddles
    Agree, agree.

    I too would hope that some basic but effective AAM could be used, I'd feel very naked without it in this day and age.

    Cheers,
    Mac

  7. #7

    Third Oceangoing Patrol Vessel (OPV) for Royal Netherlands Navy Starts Sea Acceptance Trials in the Black Sea

    (Source: Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding; issued Sept. 29, 2011)

    On Tuesday, September 27th the third Oceangoing Patrol Vessel (OPV), FRIESLAND, left the Damen Shipyard from Galati, Romania for her Sea Acceptance Trials. After a journey of 150 kilometres along the Danube, the ship has arrived at the Black Sea where it will be conducting tests for the next 10 days.

    During this so-called platform trial run, the entire ship will be subjected to extensive testing. The tests will be conducted by staff of Damen Shipyards Galati and Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding Vlissingen. The Defence Material Organisation and the Navy Command will be acting as a critical customer and the shipyard needs to demonstrate that all systems meet the requirements.

    The FRIESLAND is the third ship in the Holland class, a series of four Ocean-going Patrol Vessels (OPV) for the Royal Netherlands Navy. These 108-meter long, flexibly deployable patrol ships, with a crew of 50, will make a significant contribution to international law enforcement and security (Maritime Security Operations). To this end, they will be deployed for, among other things, anti-piracy missions, counterdrug operations and coastal guard tasks in The Netherlands as well as the Caribbean.

    The FRIESLAND was christened by the chairperson of the Lower House, Mrs. Gerdi Verbeet. In February of 2012 Damen Schelde will transfer the FRIESLAND to the Defence Material Organisation.

    The Damen Shipyards Group offers a complete range of naval and patrol vessels ranging from 7 to over 200 meters. Part of this portfolio are the Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS) naval combatants and auxiliaries, embodied by the SIGMA and ENFORCER series.

    At present DSNS also has under construction for the Royal Netherlands Navy: a Joint Logistic Support Ship (JSS), the largest military vessel built by DSNS so far. For the Royal Moroccan Navy DSNS has two SIGMA frigates under construction, the first SIGMA frigate was transferred to the Royal Moroccan Navy on 10 September 2011.

    -ends-

  8. #8

    Transfer of the Second Holland Class Patrol Vessel “Zeeland” for the Royal Netherlands Navy

    (Source: Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding; issued Oct. 24, 2011)

    On Thursday 20 October, the second of four Holland Class Oceangoing Patrol Vessels, “Zeeland” built by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding for the Royal Netherlands Navy, was transferred to the Defence Materiel Organization of the Ministry of Defence of the Netherlands.

    Immediately after delivery, the “Zeeland” departed the Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding facilities to arrive in Den Helder 21 October. In the near future the ship is scheduled to conduct a work-up period from Den Helder. On completion of the second Integrated Mast Module by Thales NL the ship will return to Vlissingen for installation of the Thales Integrated Mast Module (IMM)

    Ocean-going patrol vessel

    The four vessels of the Holland Class OPV’s measure 108 metres in length and 18 metres in width with a displacement of approximately 3,750 tons. They offer hangar space and landing facilities for one NH-90 helicopter or equivalent types. Their armament consists of one 76 mm Oto-Melara gun, one rapid-fire 30 mm gun and two 12.7 mm Hitrole machine guns. The weapons all have full remote control. Thanks to the state-of-the-art sensor and communication technology in the Integrated Mast Module (IMM), detection and tracking of high- and low-altitude air targets, fast boats, periscopes, mines and even swimmers will be possible.

    The first two patrol vessels, “Holland” and “’Zeeland”, are built at the shipyard of Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding in Vlissingen, with a number of sections being supplied by the Damen shipyard in Galati. The “Holland” was handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy earlier this year in May.

    The third and fourth vessels, “Friesland” and “Groningen” are built at the Damen shipyard in Galati under the supervision of Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding. Partial SAT for the “Friesland” have been successfully completed last September. Presently she will sail to the Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding yard for final outfitting of certain systems and components.

    The Damen Shipyards Group offers a complete range of naval and patrol vessels ranging from 7 to over 200 meters. Parts of this portfolio are the Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS) naval combatants and auxiliaries, embodied by the SIGMA and ENFORCER series. At present DSNS also has under construction for the Royal Netherlands Navy: a Joint Logistic Support Ship (JSS), the largest military vessel built by DSNS so far. For the Royal Moroccan Navy, DSNS has a series of three SIGMA frigates under construction, the first SIGMA frigate, Tarik ben Zayid was transferred to the Royal Moroccan Navy last month.

    -ends-

  9. #9

    Sea Acceptance Trials of the Second Multi Mission Frigate for the Royal Moroccan Navy

    (Source: Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding; issued Nov. 22, 2011)

    The 98 meters long SIGMA class frigate, the second frigate built by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding for the Royal Moroccan Navy, left Vlissingen on the 18th of November for her sea acceptance trials (SAT) in the North Sea, right on schedule as agreed in the contract.

    During the SAT, a very intensive program will be carried out in which the platform as well as the sensor weapons and communications suite are extensively tested. The tests are performed by representatives of the yard in close cooperation with representatives of the subcontractors, the Royal Moroccan navy and the Royal Netherlands Navy.

    The first SIGMA frigate was transferred to the Royal Moroccan Navy on 10 September 2011.

    The second frigate is scheduled to be transferred in February 2012 whilst the third frigate, also 98 meters, is still under construction at the Damen yard in Vlissingen and is scheduled for Sea Acceptance Trials in May 2012.

    The three SIGMA-class frigates for the Royal Moroccan Navy have been designed according to Schelde Naval Shipbuilding's revolutionary SIGMA-approach and are a further development of the SIGMA-corvettes for the Indonesian Navy. The SIGMA approach applies modularity in many areas.

    The Moroccan SIGMA Class frigates equipped to conduct the traditional naval tasks as well as maritime security operations. The vessels are also suited to support humanitarian aid operations.

    The Damen Shipyards Group offers a complete range of naval and patrol vessels ranging from 7 to over 200 meters. Part of this portfolio are the Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS) naval combatants and auxiliaries, embodied by the SIGMA and ENFORCER series.

    At present DSNS also has under construction for the Royal Netherlands Navy: four Patrol Ships and a Joint Logistic Support Ship (JSS), the largest military vessel built by DSNS so far.

    -ends-

  10. #10

    Integrated Mast Passes Factory Acceptance Test with Flying Colours

    (Source: Thales Nederland; issued November 24, 2011)

    The first Integrated Mast IM400 has successfully passed the Factory Acceptance Test. The FAT was attended by a delegation from the Netherland’s Defence Materiel Organisation and the Royal Netherlands Navy.

    Since the IM400 consists of various subsystems, the actual FAT comprised several tests. After the successful tests the contract partner accepted the first Integrated Mast.

    Thales Nederland’s CEO Gerben Edelijn says: “this FAT proves that we are capable of designing, engineering and building a completely new concept in naval sensor and communication technology in a relatively very short time, which once more demonstrates our leading position in this field.”

    Following the FAT, the IM400 was shipped to Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding and successfully installed on the first patrol vessel “Holland”.

    The second IM400 is presently being built by Thales in Hengelo. It will be installed on the second Patrol Ship “Zeeland” early 2012.

    About the Integrated Mast

    The integrated mast is a completely different design approach from the traditional sensor layout on board of naval vessels. One central mast structure houses the radar, optronic, and communication sensors and antennas as well as all cabinets and peripherals. The advantages of this sensor concept are huge: better operational performance, higher operational availability, reduced ship-building time, reduced maintenance requirements and enormous savings in below-deck space.

    About the sensors

    SeaMaster 400 is a non-rotating S-band radar with four faces for air and surface surveillance. It is derived from the proven SMART and APAR radar systems. SM400’s unique concept of multibeam volume search with four active scanning faces ensures the simultaneous performance of all operational tasks at a high update rate and very low false alarm rate. SM400 also provides helicopter direction and approach capabilities and has three fire control channels. The system’s high number of parallel transmit and receive channels provide a high degree of redundancy.

    Seawatcher is a four face non-rotating active phased array X-band radar for naval surface surveillance. The high resolution system automatically detects and tracks asymmetric threats and very small objects such as mines, periscopes. Seawatcher can also be used for helicopter guidance.

    Gatekeeper is a 360° panoramic electro-optical surveillance and alerter system based on IR/TV technology. Designed to counter emerging asymmetric threats down to small boats and swimmers, Gatekeeper increases short-range situational awareness in littoral environments.

    ICAS, the Integrated Communication Antenna System facilitates the use of standard VHF/UHF communications equipment, is fitted with Link 16 integration, provides excellent transmit/receive isolation, offers estate for auxiliary antennas such as GSM/GPS and is designed for future growth.

    NR IFF, the non-rotating Identification Friend or Foe, uses a cylindrical array fitted to the top of the structure. It is designed to operate with standard interrogator/transponder systems. It is optimized for operation with a non-rotating primary radar and offers accuracy commensurate with Mode 5/S.

    Thales is a global technology leader for the Defence & Security and the Aerospace & Transport markets. In 2010, the company generated revenues of EUR 13.1 billion with 68,000 employees in 50 countries. With its 22,500 engineers and researchers, Thales has a unique capability to design, develop and deploy equipment, systems and services that meet the most complex security requirements. Thales has an exceptional international footprint, with operations around the world working with customers as local partners.

    Thales Nederland employs about 2,000 staff members. The company, established in 1922, is one of the leading companies in integrated naval systems for surveillance, weapon control, combat management and system integration worldwide.

    -ends-

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