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Thread: Australian Army 2011 onwards

  1. #11

    Boeing Supports Australian Army Kiowa Fleet Through 60,000 Flight Hours

    (Source: Boeing Australia; issued April 19, 2011)

    OAKEY, Queensland, -- Boeing earlier this month reached the milestone of supporting the Australian Army's 27 Bell 206B-1 Kiowa helicopters for more than 60,000 flight hours. The achievement includes 180 hours of relief efforts following the recent cyclone and flooding in Queensland.

    Boeing and its heritage companies have supported the Kiowa for 14 years. Since the Army Aviation Training & Training Support (AATTS) contract began in 2007, Boeing has trained more than 120 Kiowa pilots and performed ongoing maintenance tasks for 19 Kiowa training helicopters at the Army Aviation Training Centre in Oakey, and for the 173rd Aviation Squadron's eight transport Kiowas at Holsworthy, New South Wales.

    "When Cyclone Yasi severely damaged north Queensland in February, the Australian Army supplied all available training and transport Kiowas to support Operation Yasi Assist," said Mark Brownsey, program manager for Boeing Defence Australia (BDA). "Boeing aircraft maintainers worked around the clock alongside the Army for two weeks to keep those Kiowas flying. Congratulations to our AATTS team for achieving this milestone and for assisting the Army with its 2,000 training missions annually."

    "The support from BDA during the Queensland floods this year was simply outstanding, and the Army Aviation Training Centre aircraft and crews could not have conducted the lifesaving flying operations that they did without this one-team approach," said Col. Peter Steel, Commandant at the School of Army Aviation, Army Aviation Training Centre.

    Boeing also trains the Army's Black Hawk helicopter pilots, aircrew and technicians at Oakey, and the service's CH-47D Chinook pilots and technicians at 5th Aviation Regiment in Townsville, north Queensland.

    The company will continue to deliver the AATTS training and flight support program until the Australian Defence Force's Project Air 9000 Phase 7 -- Helicopter Aircrew Training System (HATS) -- comes into service. HATS will combine the delivery of Australian Army and Navy rotary wing training.

    Boeing Defence Australia, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Boeing Company and a business unit of Boeing Defense, Space & Security, is a leading Australian aerospace enterprise. With a world-class team of about 1,500 employees at 15 locations throughout Australia and four international sites, Boeing Defence Australia supports some of the largest and most complex defense projects in Australia.

    A unit of The Boeing Company, Boeing Defense, Space & Security is one of the world's largest defense, space and security businesses specializing in innovative and capabilities-driven customer solutions, and the world's largest and most versatile manufacturer of military aircraft. Headquartered in St. Louis, Boeing Defense, Space & Security is a $32 billion business with 66,000 employees worldwide.

    -ends-

  2. #12

    I never understood why we didn't upgade a few of ours to Kiowa Warrior standard to tide us over until the Tigers were ready and take over from the massively out of date Bushrangers in the mid - late 90's...

    Our Army could have done with Kiowa warrior in Timor instead of a bloke in a standard Kiowa with a pair of binos and a 40mm Wombat gun...

  3. #13

    Probably never happened cos our Political Incompetents believed the BS EADS was spouting about in-service dates.............combine that with general idiocy when it comes to Army-related aviation especially in the 80's, 90's and early 2000's.........

  4. #14

    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Digger View Post
    Our Army could have done with Kiowa warrior in Timor instead of a bloke in a standard Kiowa with a pair of binos and a 40mm Wombat gun...
    He also had a 35mm Nikkon with a big zoom lense... Those ex USMC AH-1Ws sitting in the Boneyard during INTERFET that were offered in the early 90s would have been a good alternative as well.

  5. #15

    Japanese may train with Aust troops: PM

    April 23, 2011 - 2:44AM .

    AAP

    Prime Minister Julia Gillard says Japanese troops could be allowed to train in Australian defence units under a new vision for greater military co-operation by both countries.

    The Prime Minister outlined her vision in The Weekend Australian newspaper in an interview in Tokyo on Friday, saying she's open to exploring the idea of Japan's soldiers gaining direct experience from their more combat-ready Australian peers, 66 years after World War Two.

    The Australian reported last year that Japan's Defence Minister Toshimi Kitizawa is keen for Japanese troops to draw on the combat experience that Diggers have gained in East Timor, Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Ms Gillard says she's yet to receive a formal proposal, but supports the idea being discussed by the defence and foreign ministers of each country.

    Although Japan's post-war military is restricted to self-defence and peacekeeping operations, Tokyo is keen to boost its combat readiness in response to a more powerful China and the growing threat of North Korea.

    2011 AAP

  6. #16

    Quote Originally Posted by Gubler, A. View Post
    He also had a 35mm Nikkon with a big zoom lense... Those ex USMC AH-1Ws sitting in the Boneyard during INTERFET that were offered in the early 90s would have been a good alternative as well.
    Never understood why we didn't get them...

  7. #17

    Quote Originally Posted by Gubler, A. View Post
    He also had a 35mm Nikkon with a big zoom lense... Those ex USMC AH-1Ws sitting in the Boneyard during INTERFET that were offered in the early 90s would have been a good alternative as well.
    Definitely. From recollection we could have had 40x re-manufactured AH-1W Super Cobras with weapons, sensors, spares etc for $150m, in-service with plenty of time for Timor and Afghanistan to support SOCOMD from 2002 onwards...

    For another $600m or so we could have re-manufactured them to AH-1Z standard and reached IOC with a world standard attack chopper well before the Tiger will be ready, saving about $300m in the process and gaining a larger and arguably superior capability...

    Strange really, given the ALP's predilection for second hand US kit in the early to mid-90's... (F-111G's, LST's, SH-2GA's)...

  8. #18

    The only ‘possible’ problem with the AH-Ws were they were the rebuilt from AH-1T. The USMC kept its 170 odd new built Whiskey Cobras and the 40 odd rebuilds were disposed of post Gulf War. These were the Whiskey Cobras offered to the Army. They were originally built in the late 1970s as AH-1Ts but were only 10-12 years old when offered to the Army and had undergone a major rebuild. They were younger than the Kiowas they would have replaced. Perhaps the big problem facing the AH-1W buy was it was to early. The Government did not approve the capability proposal to replace the Kiowa (and Iroquois Bushranger) until February 1994. So a mate’s rates deal from the USMC for 40 odd AH-1Ws would have arrived without approval from the government for such equipment. Whereas the LPAs and F-111Gs were all for pre-approved capability requirements. That doesn’t mean something couldn’t have been worked up if the motivation from the political leadership was there. Obviously it wasn’t.

    PS The Howard Government selected the Seasprite in 1997.

    PPS We probably would have brought new build AH-1Zs to replace them because this was in many ways a much simpler option while an aircraft was in service. Otherwise the old airframe has to be withdrawn from service a few years before a new one is provided and the operators don't have anything to fly in the mean time. With new build AH-1Zs they just hop out of the old and into the new when they are ready. Delays in the AH-1Z program would have been far more manageable than delays in Tiger ARH because the legacy aircraft would be on hand.

  9. #19

    BAE System upgrades Australian AADS

    April 28, 2011

    BAE Systems has successfully completed System Acceptance Testing (SAT) for the Army's Advanced Air Defence Simulator (AADS) Refresh project.

    The world-class AADS training facility, located at the 16th Air Defence Regiment's provides training capability in the use of ground to air missile systems.

    In December 2009, the Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) awarded BAE Systems a $5 million contract to refresh critical equipment at the Australian Army's Advanced Air Defence Simulator (AADS).

    The refresh was due for completion at the end of March 2011, but due to the Army's requirements a compressed schedule was requested by the Defence Materiel Organisation which BAE Systems was able to deliver. The facility reopened on Monday 31 January 2011.

    Under the project BAE Systems has replaced obsolete simulator dome projectors, computers and software with the very latest equipment and programs to produce higher fidelity visuals and extend the facility's life.

    The Commanding Officer of the 16th Air Defence Regiment, LTCOL John McLean explains "The refresh of the facility is excellent, the new display system is extremely impressive and means our ability to provide a simulated controlled tactical environment for the training of Ground Based Air Defenders is even more effective".

    BAE Systems Training and Support Systems Manager, Steve Baldock, said: "The BAE Systems team has worked extremely hard to ensure successful delivery of the refresh and to accommodate the customer's requirement for a compressed implementation schedule. It's great to see the new system working so effectively for our customer."

    BAE Systems was responsible for building the original AADS facility delivered in July 2005. It has been maintained and operated by BAE Systems staff since its inception.

    Originally known as Land 19 Phase 2B, BAE Systems is also contracted to operate the facility through to July 2013, providing the Army with the capability to deliver 270 training days each year.

    Source: BAE Systems

  10. #20

    BAE System upgrades Australian AADS

    April 28, 2011



    BAE Systems has successfully completed System Acceptance Testing (SAT) for the Army's Advanced Air Defence Simulator (AADS) Refresh project.

    The world-class AADS training facility, located at the 16th Air Defence Regiment's provides training capability in the use of ground to air missile systems.

    In December 2009, the Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) awarded BAE Systems a $5 million contract to refresh critical equipment at the Australian Army's Advanced Air Defence Simulator (AADS).

    The refresh was due for completion at the end of March 2011, but due to the Army's requirements a compressed schedule was requested by the Defence Materiel Organisation which BAE Systems was able to deliver. The facility reopened on Monday 31 January 2011.

    Under the project BAE Systems has replaced obsolete simulator dome projectors, computers and software with the very latest equipment and programs to produce higher fidelity visuals and extend the facility's life.

    The Commanding Officer of the 16th Air Defence Regiment, LTCOL John McLean explains "The refresh of the facility is excellent, the new display system is extremely impressive and means our ability to provide a simulated controlled tactical environment for the training of Ground Based Air Defenders is even more effective".

    BAE Systems Training and Support Systems Manager, Steve Baldock, said: "The BAE Systems team has worked extremely hard to ensure successful delivery of the refresh and to accommodate the customer's requirement for a compressed implementation schedule. It's great to see the new system working so effectively for our customer."

    BAE Systems was responsible for building the original AADS facility delivered in July 2005. It has been maintained and operated by BAE Systems staff since its inception.

    Originally known as Land 19 Phase 2B, BAE Systems is also contracted to operate the facility through to July 2013, providing the Army with the capability to deliver 270 training days each year.

    Source: BAE Systems

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