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buglerbilly
27-03-12, 09:44 PM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

JLTV's Whole New Game

Posted by Paul McLeary at 3/27/2012 1:00 PM CDT



Well, this should make the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on Army modernization this afternoon a bit more interesting. This morning we learned that Navistar Defense has left the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) team headed up by BAE Systems to strike out on its own, and that BAE is turning to an engine made by commercial manufacturer Ford Motor Company for its family of JLTVs.

Navistar said that it has submitted its Saratoga light tactical vehicle—which it debuted in October at the AUSA convention in Washington—to the Army in consideration for the JLTV, with company spokesperson Elissa Koc telling Aviation Week that by the time of its unveiling, the company had already achieved “an 85 percent solution” for the JLTV, “and we just needed to go that extra 15 percent.” The plan at the time was to submit the vehicle to the Army’s now-scuttled Modernized Expanded Capacity Vehicle (MECV) program—otherwise known as the Humvee recap—while shooting for a “middle ground” approach between the MECV specs and JLTV specs. “We really did go after the gap between those two [programs]” Koc said, adding that “it was ready for production in October.”

That extra 15 percent included reducing the weight of the vehicle, Koc says, while looking for “potential suppliers to integrate a digital backbone” into the vehicle and adding new power generation capabilities. She also points to a high level of commonality between the Saratoga and the thousands of MRAPs that the company has fielded in Iraq and Afghanistan. While the company quoted a $250,000 per unit cost last fall, the Army has subsequently said that it is looking for submissions in the $225,000 range, before armor packages are added. Koc said that the company has met all EMD requirements and that the pricing “is not far off from where we were before.”

BAE Systems, while parting ways with Navistar today also continued its work on the JLTV program, entering a submission for the EMD phase while making its own big announcement that it has selected Ford Motor Company’s Power Stroke 6.7 liter turbocharged diesel engine for its vehicle. Since Navistar was handling the engine integration and was to provide the manufacturing capability for the team’s JLTVs, a BAE spokesperson said that no decision has yet been made on a new production location.

Lockheed Martin, who has also been in the competition from the beginning, also announced today that it was moving forward with an EMD submission. During a call with reporters, Kathryn Hasse, Lockheed Martin’s JLTV program director said that the company has already driven its vehicle a 160,000 combined test miles, while “taking significant cost out of the design, as well as weight.” Pointedly, Hasse was sure to mention that Lockheed has had a “stable team” for seven years working on the program.

The deadline for submissions for the JLTVs EMD phase is today, and the Army is generally expected to award up to three contracts this summer as part of the 33-month EMD process.

buglerbilly
28-03-12, 11:13 AM
Line-up confirmed for JLTV EMD phase

27 March 2012 - 22:20 by Andrew White in Miami



The US DoD has received final bids for the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programme.

In line with the 27 March deadline to respond to October's request for proposals (RfP), it has emerged that five bids have been entered for the programme. These include Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems; Oshkosh Defense; and BAE Systems and Northrop Grumman.

In addition, Navistar has also pursued the RfP with a variant of its Saratoga vehicle after a last minute split from the BAE Systems and Northrop Grumman bid while General Tactical Vehicles' Eagle, a joint venture between General Dynamics Land Systems and AM General was also officially entered. The US Army was unavailable to confirm which bids had been received.

Handled on behalf of the US Army and Marine Corps by the army's Program Executive Office for Combat Support and Combat Service Support (PEO CS & CSS), up to three winning bidders are expected to be announced in June. This will comprise delivery of 22 prototype vehicles and associated equipment for a test and evaluation programme.

This, sources informed Shephard, will be followed by a Milestone C decision in 2013 with the downselect of a single bidder for LRIP in 2015. However, it is understood that the DoD will reserve the right to conduct another full and open competition for LRIP should other technology meeting JLTV requirements become available.

The JLTV programme came under close scrutiny last year when government officials threatened to axe the programme in light of current economic constraints. However, Lockheed Martin’s JLTV programme director Kathryn Hasse described to Shephard 'very strong support' from the army and marine corps. She added that PEO CS & CSS's intent was to procure some 50,000 JLTV platforms in the long term.

The Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems offering comprises a maximum gross vehicle weight of 21,500lbs with blast protection equivalent to 'some MRAP vehicles deployed in theatre', Hasse admitted.

'Our improvements removed hundreds of pounds of weight from our TD design, which was already proven in helicopter lift tests. We have incorporated more affordable materials and reduced exotic metals such as titanium. This was accomplished while maintaining the significant blast protection and vehicle capability already demonstrated,' Hasse explained.

On Monday, BAE Systems and Northrop Grumman confirmed that it would submit a proposal for the EMD phase of the programme with a spokesperson saying: 'We have worked hard over the last year to strengthen our team and our offer.'

Glenn Lamartin, BAE Systems JLTV programme manager said: 'We kept the best from the TD phase and applied it to our EMD vehicles.' He described how its offering was 'light enough for transport by air or sea and agile on road and off'. BAE Systems also announced that its solution will include Ford's Power Stroke 6.7 litre turbocharged diesel engine.

Finally, Oshkosh Defense has offered up the latest generation of its Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) which comprises 'MRAP-level' protection.

John Bryant, VP and GM of Joint and Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense said: 'Our engineers have drawn upon extensive tactical vehicle operating experience in Iraq and Afghanistan to develop the L-ATV, with an eye toward future combat environments.'

buglerbilly
28-03-12, 11:54 AM
Lockheed M's Production-Optimized JLTV is Lighter and Costs Less

Lockheed Martin [NYSE:LMT] today submitted a proposal for a substantially lighter and more affordable Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) for the next phase of the U.S. Army and Marine Corps competition.

The Lockheed Martin team optimized its Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) design for production while maintaining the proven force protection, mobility, transportability and reliability of the earlier Technology Demonstration (TD) model.

“Our improvements removed hundreds of pounds of weight from our TD design, which was already proven in helicopter lift tests,” said Scott Greene, vice president of ground vehicles at Lockheed Martin’s Missiles and Fire Control business. “With more than 160,000 combined testing miles behind us, we’ve demonstrated our JLTV can reliably meet protection standards of many existing mine-resistant vehicles in combat today. This vehicle is ready to meet our customers’ needs with lower-cost materials at full-rate production.”

Throughout 2010 and 2011, the team took lessons learned from JLTV’s extensive testing and applied them to an evolved design. The team accomplished this through digital engineering analysis, virtual design builds, component tests and physical stress testing.

“Our EMD design lowers the cost of each vehicle, and not just through economies of scale,” said Kathryn Hasse, Lockheed Martin’s JLTV program director. “We have incorporated more affordable materials and reduced exotic metals such as titanium. This was accomplished while maintaining the significant blast protection and vehicle capability already demonstrated.”

Source : Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE: LMT)

Published on ASDNews: Mar 28, 2012

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-41764/Lockheed_M_s_Production-Optimized_JLTV_is_Lighter_and_Costs_Less.htm#ixzz1 qPL87o4W

buglerbilly
28-03-12, 01:08 PM
Navistar's SARATOGA for those that don't remember................

buglerbilly
28-03-12, 01:20 PM
Israel Aerospace Industries to Present the New RAM MK3 'AT' Configuration- Armored Tank Hunter Vehicle

(Source: Israel Aerospace Industries; issued March 27, 2012)



Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) will present its new armored tank hunter/killer system: the RAM MK3 'AT' (Anti- Tank) Configuration. The system will be on display during March 27 to 30, 2012 at the Fidae Air Show in Santiago, Chile.

The new configuration is based on the fielded RAM Mk.3 light-weight and high- terrain capability armored vehicle, developed and manufactured by IAI's RAMTA division. As its main weapon system it carries four NIMROD SR (Short-Range) missiles on pop-up launchers. NIMROD SR Weapon System, developed by IAI's MBT Missiles division, is a semi-active laser guided missile. It can be designated by the firing RAM-AT or by an indirect designation, by helicopter, UAV, forward observers etc. The NIMROD SR missile has a range of up to 8 km when launched from the RAM-AT platform.

The RAM MK3 'AT' configuration was developed after a thorough study and field testing period and it is based on recent battlefield requirements that showed the importance of an agile all-terrain vehicle that is mobile and carries a modern and proven laser guided missiles.

"This powerful combination high-maneuverable capability and fire- power allows a mobile combat force to use extreme terrain to its tactical advantage by bringing the sum of these two proven battlefield assets to bear on enemy armor wherever it may be found", said an executive of Ramta.

IAI will present at Fidae 2012 its advanced technological solutions and products. Among IAI's products to be presented: The Barak-8 air and missile defense system, Heron UAS, the ELW-2085 CAEW (Conformal Airborne Early Warning & Control) system and the ELM-2112 persistent ground and coastal surveillance radar. Advanced payloads will be displayed including the POP 300D plug-in Optronic Payload -"Designator" and the MOSP (Multi-Mission-Optronic Stabilized Payload) family. The Panther VTOL (Vertical Take-off and Landing) tactical UAS will also be displayed.

-ends-

buglerbilly
28-03-12, 08:53 PM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

More JLTV News

Posted by Paul McLeary at 3/28/2012 1:58 PM CDT



While at the start of the week there had been just three teams competing for the Army/Marine Corps’ Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program, by Wednesday there were six.

The teams that we’ve been covering since 2008 consisted of BAE Systems and Navistar; General Tactical Vehicles (General Dynamics and AM General); and Lockheed Martin. Yesterday, we found out that Navistar was breaking away form BAE and striking out on its own with the Saratoga light tactical vehicle. And today, AM General and Oshkosh announced that they were also both submitting bids for the engineering manufacturing development (EMD) phase. AM General will continue to work with General Dynamics on their joint project while pursuing their independent bid. (To be a fly on the wall at that next meeting, huh?) The company is calling its truck the Blast Resistant Vehicle-Off Road (BRV-O).

Oshkosh, whose bid with Northrop Grumman was shut out of the program when the Technology Development phase was awarded in 2008, is submitting its Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) as a candidate for the program.

In response to my post yesterday where I wrote that BAE Systems is unsure where it will manufacture its JLTVs now that Navistar has left the team, (and a Tweet where I probably got a little too excited) company spokesperson Stephanie Bissell Serkhoshian emails with a fair rebuttal. “We think it’s premature to make a decision on production today given that it begins in 2016. We’ll have all of our production processes in place so that we can competitively make a selection that gives the government best value based on the industrial base at that time.”

The Army is expected to select up to three vehicles some time this summer to participate in the 27-month EMD phase of the program, and then purchase about 50,000 trucks, while the Marine Corps has said it will purchase about 2,500.

buglerbilly
28-03-12, 09:05 PM
AM General Submits Independent Bid for JLTV

Mar. 28, 2012 - 11:33AM

By KATE BRANNEN


U.S. Humvees are shown at Joint Base Balad, Iraq, in February 2011, awaiting transit back to the U.S. Six bids have been made for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, an effort by the U.S. military to develop a Humvee replacement. (Staff file photo)

AM General has announced that it has submitted its own bid for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV), an effort by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps to develop a replacement for its Humvees, adding a new team to an already very competitive field.

AM General, the longtime Humvee maker, is already supporting a bid submitted by General Tactical Vehicles, a joint venture formed in 2007 with General Dynamics Land Systems.

The General Tactical Vehicles team received one of three JLTV technology development contracts in 2008, under which it designed and built a number of prototypes for the Army and Marine Corps to test and evaluate.

Now, AM General is offering the Blast-Resistant Vehicle-Off Road (BRV-O), which the company says builds on more than a decade of independent research and development investment.

Companies wanting to compete in the engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) phase of the program had to submit bids by March 27.

“BRV-O features a crew capsule and modular armor already proven effective in government-supervised blast testing,” an AM General news release said.

Oshkosh announced March 27 that it is also joining the race, while Navistar and BAE Systems, which paired for the technology development phase, are now competing separately.

The Defense Department has said it plans to award up to three contracts for the 27-month EMD phase. There are two planned JLTV variants: a Combat Tactical Vehicle that can transport four passengers and carry 3,500 pounds. and a Combat Support Vehicle that can transport two passengers and carry 5,100 pounds.

The Army plans to buy at least 50,000 vehicles with the option to buy more, while the Marines could buy 5,500 vehicles. The new target price per vehicle is $250,000.

In October 2008, the Army awarded three contracts for the technology development phase of the program. Winning teams were Lockheed Martin, a BAE Systems/Navistar team and General Tactical Vehicles. Those teams built and delivered several prototypes, which the Army and Marine Corps evaluated in an effort to refine vehicle requirements.

The Army said all along that it would reopen the competition for the EMD phase of the program, but many predicted the companies that participated in the technology development would have an advantage.

That advantage may not be as firm since the Army and Marine Corps overhauled the requirements to bring down weight and cost, and win back congressional support.

Here are the other teams who have confirmed their bids for the EMD phase:

Lockheed Martin

Formed in 2005, the core Lockheed Martin-led JLTV team includes the tactical wheeled vehicles team at BAE Systems in Sealy, Texas. It also includes Cummins Engine, Allison Transmission, Bosch, Meritor Defense, Lotus Engineering, L3 Combat Propulsion Systems and Vehma International of America.

It was one of three teams that won a contract for the JLTV technology development phase.

“Our improvements removed hundreds of pounds of weight from our [technology development] design, which was already proven in helicopter lift tests,” Scott Greene, vice president of ground vehicles at Lockheed Martin’s Missiles and Fire Control business, said in a statement.

By relying on more affordable materials and reducing the use of exotic metals, like titanium, the industry team was able to bring down cost, according to Kathryn Hasse, Lockheed’s JLTV program director.

General Tactical Vehicles (GTV)

As expected, the joint venture between General Dynamics Land Systems and AM General is also competing for a contract. The team’s vehicle, the Eagle, makes use of a Double-V hull design, which has proved effective against roadside bombs in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“With the GTV JLTV Eagle, we offer a modified non-developmental, low-risk vehicle with inherent manufacturing readiness that is built for program success and an accelerated path to production,” Mark Roualet, president of General Dynamics Land Systems, said in a statement.

BAE Systems

BAE Systems teamed up with Navistar Defense in the last round of JLTV, but this time around the companies are submitting separate bids.

The BAE Systems-led team still includes Northrop Grumman and Meritor Defense. With its submission, BAE announced that it had also selected an engine designed and built by Ford. They are calling their vehicle the Valanx.

“We are excited about this significant enhancement to our team and vehicle, and look forward to the possibilities it could offer in the future,” BAE spokeswoman Stephanie Serkhoshian said in an email.

Ford designed and built the 6.7 Power Stroke engine for its F-Series Super Duty trucks.

Navistar

Navistar will bid with a variant of its Saratoga light tactical vehicle, which Navistar launched in October after conducting its own automotive and blast testing, the company said.

“We made a significant investment in developing the Saratoga on our own nickel because that’s what we do commercially — it is part of our DNA,” Archie Massicotte, Navistar Defense president, said in a news release. “The Saratoga is a solid design and now that we have seen the requirements of the JLTV migrate toward our vehicle capabilities, we are in a position to modify the Saratoga to fit those requirements.”

Oshkosh

Oshkosh is offering a variant of its Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV).

The company says it has committed significant resources for light vehicle research and development to produce the L-ATV.

“Since 2006, we have aggressively and continuously worked to design, develop and test the L-ATV to deliver a robust, mature solution for the JLTV EMD phase,” John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Joint and Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense, said in a statement.

Oshkosh also builds the MRAP-All Terrain Vehicle, designed to meet an urgent need in Afghanistan for a lighter MRAP.

buglerbilly
29-03-12, 02:55 AM
And it looks like this.......

http://amgeneralbrv-o.com/#bottom

buglerbilly
29-03-12, 03:38 AM
US Army Tropic Regions Test Center puts MRAP through its paces



During the worst years of the Iraqi insurgency, the mine-resistant, ambush protected vehicle was developed to protect American Soldiers from the destructive power of roadside bombs and other improvised explosive devices .

U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, or YPG, played an extensive role in the rapid initiative to field these life-protecting vehicles, conducting punishing durability testing on virtually all of its variants.

The proving ground, which is located in the desert of southwestern Arizona, has terrain and climate that closely matches those of Iraq, which made it ideal for testing the vehicles under realistic conditions. With the vehicle having proved its mettle and tenacity both here and in theater, the mine-resistant, ambush protected vehicle, or MRAP, was tested at YPG's Cold Region Test Center, or CRTC, at Fort Greeley, Alaska, in the winter of 2010-11, leaving tropics as the last climate in which it had never been put through its paces.

"As operations in Afghanistan and Iraq wind down, the armed forces are becoming more focused on the need to test equipment in arctic and tropical environments," said Ernest Hugh, director of U.S. Army Tropic Regions Test Center, or TRTC, a subordinate command of YPG.

Unlike the other test centers, however, TRTC owns no land and must rely on the permission of host nations to conduct evaluations. Though this is obtained with relative ease thanks to TRTC's strong rapport with the American embassies in the foreign nations in which it conducts tests, there are still the challenges of finding and improving a suitable test site, transporting equipment to it, and housing personnel for multi-month missions far from home.

PREPARATIONS

When TRTC conducted its first test in the nation of Suriname in 2008, it took the efforts of hundreds of people and scores of local contractors to make it a success.

"During the first test, we were completely new to the country," said Julio Zambrano, test officer on the MRAP test. "We didn't know the culture or the normal way of operating. It was a groundbreaking experience with lots of lessons on what to do and what not to do."

Though the test was completed five weeks ahead of schedule, the 20-person crew experienced a great many hardships. The test took place near Moengo, a town of about 7,000 people, and though the crew's housing was upscale by local standards, it was substandard to typical American expectations.

The crew was also isolated: the capital city of Paramaribo was 60 miles away and accessible only by unimproved roads, meaning they only traveled there one day per month. Additionally, throughout the test there were constant concerns from local citizens about the scope and duration of the testing, which required a great deal of deft diplomacy on the part of the testers.

When the MRAP project manager expressed interest in conducting a similar durability test in Suriname in 2011, TRTC officials were determined to maximize convenience and minimize costs.

"We went into this test with a whole new philosophy," said Terry Barton, TRTC's site manager in Suriname. "We can get the contractor to do things with fewer people and much cheaper than the first test. We've learned a lot and come a long way in our knowledge of how to work in Suriname."

Though the MRAP test required a long test course like the Stryker evaluation, TRTC officials were keen to find a more centrally-located facility. After significant inquiries, TRTC officials found a promising site near the village of Afobaka that addressed many of the shortcomings of their prior one. Connected to Paramaribo by a paved and well-maintained highway and close to an airstrip and several other small towns, the site would be easily accessible for personnel and supplies, as well as emergency vehicles in case of an accident. The dirt road course itself snaked through 19 miles of uneven jungle terrain, perfect for putting a combat vehicle through its paces under extreme conditions.

Confident that they had a suitable site, TRTC's senior leaders began to approach officials from the United States embassy in Suriname for assistance in gaining the necessary permissions from the Surinamese government. TRTC officials gave detailed briefings to the commander of the U.S. Military Liaison Office within the embassy, who, in turn, briefed Suriname's national security adviser and Ministry of Defense. The test was ultimately approved at the highest levels of the Surinamese government.

"You develop it piece by piece," said Barton. "Once you have the track and the approvals, then you have to make provisions for a camp for the workers."

IMPROVEMENTS

Though more accessible than its predecessor, making the new test site ready for business was far from a turnkey operation. The most pressing matter was preparing the test course itself.

"In Yuma and Alaska, the tracks are already established," said Zambrano. "For this test, we start with nothing and have to get authorizations from local governments, petition for radio frequencies, and a lot of other things that are taken for granted at YTC and CRTC. It takes a lot of effort and coordination."

Unlike the Moengo test site, the 19-miles of existing roads through the jungle near Afobaka were designed to accommodate logging trucks, which are light relative to the extremely heavy vehicles used to support bauxite mining. Thus, bridges spanning the several streams across the road had to be strengthened to safely bear the weight of the beefiest MRAP variant, which weighs in at over 30,000 pounds. This retrofitting was performed by the land's owner under TRTC supervision, and was accomplished through the ingenious method of placing an open Connex trailer in the stream bed, then using massive backhoes to pile dirt and extremely thick timbers atop it.

As these repairs were being accomplished, the test courses had to be staked and mapped, and topographical maps produced. The test site needed security fencing and lighting, as well as a concrete pad and shade structure to accommodate maintenance and storage of the test vehicles. Cutting-edge prefabricated trailers were erected to house the 20 personnel that would be at the site for the duration of the test, small cabins with single rooms of about 10 feet by 10 feet, each having a window and sliding glass door.

The doorways opened onto wooden decks that served as a communal outdoor dining area outfitted with sinks, refrigerators, and other kitchen appliances brought by test personnel. There were five such cabins constructed, each taking about three weeks to complete. Due to Suriname's history as a Dutch colony, the construction codes are European-based, but the TRTC crew had experience with them from the 2008 test.

The test site was also outfitted with high speed satellite internet access and already boasted cell phone coverage, making it much more connected to the outside world than the prior location.

"We're able to communicate with anyone at any time," said Barton. "Suriname's telecommunications and online infrastructure has advanced quite a bit in the last few years, and at a much lower cost."

"We talk with Yuma every day by email and phone," added Zambrano. "They want to be sure we have everything we need to be successful. There are challenges that you don't have in Yuma, but we work through them."

SUPPORT

As TRTC personnel typically based in Panama spent several days in Yuma in June training on data collection techniques specific to MRAP testing, the carpentry shop was at work rapidly installed wooden cabinets and drawers into a common Conex container. When it was completed, mechanics outfitted this portable tool room with all the items a mechanic needs to work on heavy vehicles. The drawers and cabinet doors were strapped shut, and the trailer was shipped to Suriname along with the test vehicles and other gear.

"Nothing fell," marveled Richard Shadle, heavy equipment mechanic. "Everything was exactly in place when it arrived. They did a heck of a job, and it was completed in one day."

The three MRAPs and most of the crew's gear was sent by ship from Texas, down the Gulf of Mexico, and through the Caribbean before sailing up the Suriname River to the capital city of Paramaribo. The river there is broad, but shallow, and the heavy ship needed to be unloaded within 10 hours of arrival, at high tide, or risk going aground.

Thus when it docked at 3 a.m. on a Sunday morning, TRTC personnel scrambled to send drivers to unload the vehicles, stage them on the pier, and remove the remainder of the crew's gear packed in storage containers. Once customs officials inspected the items, TRTC personnel transported them to a secure warehouse on the outskirts of the city. As soon as the test site was ready for business, TRTC-Suriname logistician Achmad Amatsahlan arranged for a police escort to accompany the convoy transferring all of the equipment, and low boy trailers were rented from local contractors to transport the three vehicles.

"One of the low boys was very old and the distance from the lowest point to the road was about one foot," said Mora. "We had to go extremely slowly over speed bumps on the highway. It was an interesting, but safe trip."

The crew also had to contend with an unexpected storm that hit at the conclusion of the journey.

"Everyone was soaked," recalled Barton. "We couldn't move. We had to stay with the vehicles."

TEST

Durability testers do their best to push a test item to its limits. As such, each of the MRAP variants under test was driven across the rugged jungle test courses at its maximum payload capacity, achieved through placing test dummies and multi-ton plates and weights inside the vehicle. By agreement amongst themselves, the three test vehicle operators spend a week driving each MRAP variant under test, and cycle through every three weeks. However, each vehicle had a dedicated data collector for the duration of the test.

"You have to know the vehicle," said Mora. "It's a good idea for a data collector to stay with the same one."

While the test is in progress, the data collector records the time and mile marker any fault occurs at, along with any comments the driver has describing the incident. Upon return to base, the data collector also obtains meteorological data like temperature and humidity from the minute the incident occurred. If the vehicle is put out of a commission and a replacement part isn't at hand, mechanics attempt to buy one over the counter at a heavy equipment dealership in Paramaribo prior to having one shipped from the United States.

Though the test course was on leased property in a rural area, a logging firm is foresting part of the land, which means large logging trucks and other support vehicles were occasionally present when testing was in progress. For safety, test engineer Rolando Ayala rode in a pickup truck serving as escort to the test vehicles. From at least a quarter of a mile in front of the convoy, Ayala radioed the other drivers whenever a non-participating vehicle or person was on the track, giving them the specific mile marker and direction at which he sees them.

Additionally, medic and security officer Eric Nicolaisen followed the convoy in a trailing pickup truck loaded with a well-stocked first responder's aid kit in case of an accident.

"This course isn't that bad," said Jay Bomhower, driver. "We're encountering a lot of dust because it is the dry season, but we get that in Yuma, too."

The several months of test spanned both the dry and rainy seasons, and in the latter the crew had to deal with steep, muddy portions of the test track that were at times virtually impassable. Yet subjecting the vehicles to these types of conditions provided valuable insights into the vehicle's capabilities that could never be generated in a conditioning chamber.

CONCLUSION

Through the challenges, the test was accomplished thanks to the professionalism and dedication of the YPG personnel who participated.

"The team we put together adapted very well," said Zambrano. "We know what needed to be done. I thank everyone at YPG for their support."

With two vehicle tests under their belts and a sterling relationship with the American embassy and Surinamese government, TRTC personnel are bullish about their ability to successfully and economically conduct valuable future tropical testing in Suriname for a variety of systems, from vehicles to artillery pieces. Suriname would be particularly suitable for the testing of unmanned aerial systems, or UAS.

By Mark Schauer, ATEC

"Suriname has very little air traffic and the corridor is well-defined," said Hugh. "With the proper permissions, we could definitely do unmanned aircraft testing in Suriname. UAS are perfect for jungle surveillance with the right sensors, which need to be tested in the natural environment."

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-41788/US_Army_Tropic_Regions_Test_Center_puts_MRAP_throu gh_its_paces.htm#ixzz1qTAcC6N4

buglerbilly
31-03-12, 02:18 AM
The Maini Group Launches the Israeli TOMCAR Off-Road Vehicle in India

Tamir Eshel March 29, 2012 12:34 0 comments

TOMCAR is already operated by military and low enforcement forces.

The Indian Maini Group acquired a majority stake in TOMCAR, a company based in Israel engaged in design and manufacture of high performance off road vehicles. At Defexpo 2012 the Indian automotive group is launching the TOMCAR in India. “With the Indian Defence, Paramilitary and Homeland Security scouting aggressively for All Terrain Vehicles, we intend to promote TOMCAR amongst them as part of their modernization drive.” Said Sandeep Maini, Chairman of Maini Group. The Maini Group has created a manufacturing facility in Bangalore to cater for both domestic and overseas customers.



Designed in Israel and built in Israel and the USA, TOMCAR is a military grade, high-performance all-terrain vehicle designed for military, order patrol and first responder use. TOMCAR is deployed by the Israeli Military, the US Customs and Border Patrol and supports the British Army in Afghanistan as a combat support and replenishment vehicle. The Israeli military has also deployed the vehicle on border patrol missions, in an unmanned configuration known as Guardium.

TOMCAR has been customized for special operations, recce and surveillance, military and border forces. In the light strike version TOMCAR can carry Heavy Machine Gun, Anti-Tank guided missile launcher, or Automatic Grenade Launcher. It can also be fitted with a winch for self-recovery. TOMCAR has an option of being customized for both armored and unmanned versions. The vehicle is also air transportable and para-droppable.

TOMCAR all- terrain vehicles feature strong, fully-welded steel tube chassis and heavy duty four-wheel independent suspension. These vehicles are designed to be safe, rugged and extremely dependable.

The Maini Group is engaged in high precision and innovative engineering products for the last four decades and has a strong presence in diverse industry segments. Core capabilities of Maini Group include high precision components for Aerospace and Automative applications, Materials Handling Equipments, Electric Buggies for People and Cargo Movement, Storage and Shelving Systems and Plastics and Composites.

buglerbilly
31-03-12, 02:22 AM
Closely related to the British SPRINGER's..............

buglerbilly
06-04-12, 02:52 AM
Iveco completes UK Trakker delivery

05 April 2012 - 13:42 by the Shephard News Team



Iveco Defence Vehicles has completed the delivery of its largest ever order in the UK of Trakker vehicles in support of the Royal Engineers on operations.

The delivery was for 206 6x6 and 8x8 Trakkers that are replacing the existing fleet, and have been supplied through two separate procurement routes, an Iveco statement released on 5 April said.

The first of these, for 182 6x6 vehicles, was through the C Vehicle PFI contract run by ALC, the prime contractor. Vehicles were supplied in five variants, with three - the Medium Dump Truck, Self Loading Dump Truck and Truck Mounted Loader - being managed by Iveco, and the other two variants - a Drill Rig and a Flush Capping System - being procured under ALC’s direct control.

The second procurement resulted from the success of this 6x6 fleet in service, the statement said. The requirement was for a fleet of Protected Self Loading Dump Trucks for service on operations.

‘As Iveco had already developed a ballistic steel cab for the Trakker family, the 8x8 Trakker was a natural choice for this demanding role,’ Iveco said.

‘The procurement was a direct purchase by the UK MoD, with Iveco managing the complete integration activity. This required input from five separate sub-contractors – GDUK, Terex Atlas, Thompson Engineering, BI Engineering and KraussMaffei Wegmann.’

A total fleet of 24 Self Loading Dump Truck (Protected) are now in service, with the majority of the fleet on operations, and Iveco said they have been ‘extremely well received’ and ‘the protection provided by the steel cab, bar armour and other countermeasures has been particularly welcome.

‘This completes a series of successes in the field of logistic vehicles by Iveco in recent years, including significant contract wins in France, Switzerland, Germany
and Spain.’

The statement also said that the company is currently bidding to supply Trakker to the Norwegian and Swedish Armed Forces to re-equip their logistic vehicle fleets.

Redcoat
06-04-12, 11:58 AM
MOD continues to baffle me . They bought loads of MAN trucks which are excellent the boys (and girls) who drive them love them and they have eased the logistics burden for the army now they buy Ivecos to start what I am sure will be a slow path to logistics confusion and added expense,

perhaps I am missing something can anyone explain ?

buglerbilly
06-04-12, 02:37 PM
I'll try........different programmes with different basis. The Iveco's are COTS vehicles apart from the armoured cab, and that armouring is nowehere near what the MAN's carry although NOT insignificant in its own right.

There should be a significant Cost difference bwteen the two as well as a result of the COTS versus hybrid COTS/MOTS of the MAN's........the latter are not strictly Military-Off-The-Shelf as they utilise some COTS elements/componentry.

buglerbilly
24-04-12, 04:02 PM
Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle

(Source: National Defence and the Canadian Forces; issued April 23, 2012)

The Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) is a wheeled combat vehicle that can fulfill a variety of roles on the battlefield, such as reconnaissance and surveillance, security, command and control, cargo and armoured personnel carrier. The TAPV will provide a very high degree of protection to the crew while remaining highly mobile. The TAPV is designed to tackle tough terrain, providing troops with a cross-country capability, and a greater flexibility in choosing routes.

The TAPV will replace the Armoured Patrol Vehicle (RG-31), the Coyote reconnaissance vehicle (LAV 2) and will complement the Light Utility Vehicle Wheeled (G-Wagon).

There will be two variants of vehicles procured under this project. The first is the reconnaissance (recce) variant, which will replace the Coyote reconnaissance vehicle. The recce variant will have a crew of three and seating for an additional equipped passenger. The second variant, the general utility vehicle, will have a crew of three and seating for an additional three equipped passengers. Both vehicles will be equipped with a Remote Weapon Station.

The TAPV project will procure 500 vehicles with an option for an additional 100. Specifically, the Canadian Forces will acquire up to 197 of the recce variant and up to 307 of the general utility variant. Deliveries will begin in 2014 and initial operational capability is expected that year.

The final Request for Proposals was released to the seven pre-qualified bidders on March 15, 2011. Bid closure was August 29, 2011, and four bids were received. Evaluation, including physical testing at Aberdeen Test Centre, started September 6, 2011.

The Government of Canada’s Industrial and Regional Benefits policy applies to this procurement, which means the winning company must generate economic activity in Canada, dollar for dollar equal to the contract value.

-ends-

buglerbilly
27-04-12, 03:14 PM
Concept vehicle rolls out to meet Detroit public

April 26, 2012

By Bruce J. Huffman


The Army debuted its latest concept vehicle, the Fuel Efficient ground vehicle Demonstrator, or FED Bravo, to the public at the Society of Automotive Engineers 2012 World Congress in Detroit, Mich., April 24-26, 2012.

U.S. ARMY DETROIT ARSENAL, Warren, Mich. (April 26, 2012) -- This week the Army debuted its latest concept vehicle that not only significantly improves upon fuel economy, it also has the capability to generate and export electric power to Soldiers in austere locations like Afghanistan.

Following the grand opening of the arsenal's high-tech lab last week, the Fuel Efficient ground vehicle Demonstrator (Bravo version), or FED Bravo, was displayed to the public at the Society of Automotive Engineers 2012 World Congress, April 24-26. The FED Alpha concept vehicle shown to the public last fall was fuel-efficient, but could not export power like the Bravo version.

When FED Bravo plugs into a microgrid, it's capable of providing power that can be used at forward operating bases and other small military outposts, officials said, significantly reducing power requirements and helping Soldiers to be more efficient.

True to the Society of Automotive Engineers 2012 theme, "Get Connected," the Army collaborated with students at the College for Creative Studies, or CCS, in Detroit to design the concept vehicle. CCS has a thriving, highly respected automotive design program to feed the styling studios of the Big Three auto manufacturers, Ford, General Motors and Chrysler. A group of 18 CCS students designed FED Bravo to meet specific Army requirements for fuel economy, performance, protection, payload and interior layout.

FED Bravo was funded by the Defense Department and developed by engineers at the Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center in Warren, Mich., along with industry partner World Technical Services, Inc.

TARDEC has had a significant presence at the World Congress auto show. In addition to the public's introduction to FED Bravo this year, its display also featured a small TM3 microgrid system to which the vehicle could provide power.

FED Bravo sports a Ford 4.4-liter twin turbocharged V8 diesel engine capable of producing 268 hp. Other features include:

• Road-coupled parallel hybrid drive system. The front axle is powered by an electric motor, while the rear-wheel drive is linked to a hybrid fuel-powered and electric system.

• Integrated starter-generator that shuts off the engine during idle time and restarts it when the driver presses the accelerator which improves fuel economy and reduces emissions.

• Six-speed auto transmission coupled with an advanced lithium-ion battery with high energy and power density.

• The full-power hydraulic brake system with antilock brakes is combined with the vehicle's steering system to supply the hydraulic pressure demands for the steering, eliminating a second pump and improving efficiency.

• Carbon ceramic brake rotors with advanced coating for durability, plus low-drag aluminum brake calipers.

• Tubular space from chassis for better rigidity-to-weight ratio combined with armored cab and V-shaped hull for protection from blasts.

buglerbilly
28-04-12, 12:23 AM
Future Army Truck Inspired by the iPhone

By David Axe Email Author April 27, 2012 | 2:00 pm



Uploaded by Autonomoustuff on Feb 22, 2011

CAST (Convoy Active Safety Technology) demonstrates their Unmanned driving system in a dense dusty environment. The perception technology used in this video is standard off-the-shelf LIDAR and RADAR products. As you can see, the system still works perfectly, even in the most dusty situations. The perception products used in this video can be found at www.AutonomouStuff.com

The Army’s next truck should be smart, flexible, user-friendly, partially autonomous and affordable. In other words, the automotive equivalent of a gadget from Apple. At a trade conference in Virginia on Tuesday, Brig. Gen. Stephen Farmen, the chief of U.S. Army transportation, held up an iPhone. “How do we put the kind of power and technology like this into a wheeled vehicle and hit the right price point?” Farmen asked, according to a report by National Defense.

The “i-Tactical Wheeled Vehicle,” as Farmen called it, is still still years away. The Army just finished buying tens of thousands of medium transport trucks and mine-resistant battlefield transports. The branch’s new Joint Tactical Light Vehicle, a Humvee replacement, is in the final stages of design. A truck with iPhone-like capabilities designed from the wheels up might have to wait for the next round of truck replacements in 15 years or so. It’s possible by then that the Army won’t want or need a truck with smartphone-like qualities. After all, the military does tend to get caught up in the tech trend of the moment. Virtual-reality helmets, anyone?

Still, the basic technology development for a smart truck is well under way. Sensors, robotic controls and smartphone interfaces are all being tested out separately. The big challenge will be integrating all these different techs.

The resulting iTruck, as National Defense dubs it, should be optionally manned. In other words, it should be able to go on missions with an Army sergeant behind the wheel, all on its own, or in convoys mixing drivers and robots. The technology for that capability has been in development since at least 2007. That’s when a small company called Perceptek fitted several Marine-issue medium trucks with laser sensors, computer algorithms and a big red button, together called Convoy Active Safety Technology. With a press of the button, the truck’s computer brain took over from its human driver. Similarly equipped trucks lined up behind the lead truck, droning along behind it like baby ducks following their mama.

Acquired by Lockheed Martin, the CAST trucks have steadily tackled harder and harder road conditions, culminating in the desert test last year. The Army has talked about deploying the robo-trucks to Afghanistan for further testing, but that country’s relative lack of roads could squash the plan.

Human operators should be able to command their iTruck convoys using a smartphone, Farmen added. The Army has begun buying Android phones for the infantry. Meanwhile, the Navy (on behalf of the Marines) is developing Android-compatible controls for a robot cargo helicopter in development to replace the current K-MAX robo-copter.

Finally, the smart trucks should be able to beam video, mission data and even their own maintenance problems to other vehicles and to mechanics back in the motor pool. UPS proved that capability as far back as 1990, when it introduced the very first Delivery Information Acquisition Device, or DIAD — the brown tablet computer that every delivery person carries. The current DIAD V not only records signatures, it plugs into the delivery truck where it gathers, and transmits, data about the truck and its surroundings.

At the very least, the Army’s future truck should be as smart as today’s highly computerized civilian cars, Farmen said. “An Audi A8 can drive down the road and make 3,000 decisions in a mile of travel. How many decisions are the next generation of wheeled vehicles going to be able to make?” With the techs listed above, a lot. Assuming the Army can get them all to work together.

buglerbilly
03-05-12, 10:54 PM
Moving Forward With Tactical Vehicles

By Diana Wueger

Source: Defense Technology International

May 01 , 2012



Diana Wueger•Washington

After years of debate over a replacement for the High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle, or Humvee, it appears that the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) is finally moving toward a prototype and testing phase that could result in production orders from the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for more than 55,000 vehicles.

A final requirements document, issued in January, states that two variants will be built. The Combat Tactical Vehicle (CTV) will seat four and carry 3,500 lb., while the Combat Support Vehicle (CSV) will carry two troops and transport 5,100 lb. There will be two armor configurations: the basic protection package as well as an add-on kit; and one for multiple missions. A third variant that would have been a six-seat infantry carrier with a mid-weight payload has been scrapped.

Six bids for the JLTV were submitted at the end of March for the 27-month engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) phase contract. The Army is expected to issue three awards in June, each worth up to $65 million. Contractors will have 12 months to build and deliver 20 prototypes for government testing, which will last another 15 months. The decision to begin full-scale production is expected in the second quarter of fiscal 2015, with actual production to start in 2016.

In an era of declining defense budgets, it's no surprise that the competition for one of the last remaining major vehicle modernization contracts is fierce. The JLTV program is expected to cost well over $10 billion, though some put that figure as high as $70 billion, depending on per-unit cost and the number of vehicles ordered.

A joint venture between the Army and Marine Corps, the JLTV is expected to provide better protection for passengers and better payload capacity than the Humvee, while retaining mobility and reducing overall weight. The Army intends to purchase at least 50,000, while the Marine Corps is expected to acquire 5,500 vehicles, though final numbers will depend on cost.

The Humvee was done in by the effectiveness of improvised explosive devices (IED) and roadside bombs in Iraq and Afghanistan. Though it has been the primary tactical vehicle for the Army and Marine Corps for 25 years, it was unable to withstand these threats.

At a March 27 Senate Armed Services Committee hearing, Lt. Gen. Robert P. Lennox, Army deputy chief of staff, explained that the vehicle can no longer be used off-base. “The Humvee . . . is incapable of going off the forward operating base,” he said. “It doesn't provide protection for soldiers today.”

The JLTV has been an option for some time, but like most major acquisition programs has had its share of cost overruns and delays. In 2010, inter-service tension erupted over the project's direction, with the Army putting a priority on survivability, while the Marine Corps expressed reservations about the high price and expected weight, which could prove problematic for transport. It seemed as of February 2011 that the Marine Corps might abandon the JLTV, which would have caused the Army's expected price per vehicle to rise, jeopardizing the program.

Last September the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee recommended the program be terminated, noting “excessive cost growth and constantly changing requirements.” The subcommittee said the services should focus instead on recapitalizing the Humvee, which would modernize and prolong the life of those vehicles. In response, the Army and Marine Corps agreed to coordinate more closely on the JLTV and relax the weight and transportability requirements. They also agreed to bring the target cost down to roughly $250,000 per unit, which made the Humvee recapitalization project's expected cost of $200,000 per vehicle less appealing. With these changes, the JLTV escaped the budget axe, and in October a draft request for proposals (RFP) was issued to industry for a lighter, cheaper JLTV.

One of the three companies that had been selected to participate in the earlier technology development (TD) phase of acquisition is Lockheed Martin, which offers a family of vehicles that have accumulated more than 160,000 combined testing miles and exceeded the TD blast-protection expectations. In contrast to other bidders, Lockheed Martin has had a team working on the JLTV program for seven years.

“Our improvements removed hundreds of pounds of weight from our TD design, which was already proven in helicopter lift tests,” Scott Greene, vice president of ground vehicles at Lockheed Martin's Missiles and Fire Control unit, said in a statement. “We've demonstrated our JLTV can reliably meet protection standards of many existing mine-resistant vehicles in combat today. This vehicle is ready to meet our customers' needs with lower-cost materials at full-rate production.”

Also participating in the TD phase was a team led by BAE Systems, which has entered the new EMD phase competition without its TD partner Navistar, which opted to submit its own vehicle. BAE's Valanx will use a Power Stroke 6.7-liter turbodiesel engine—the same used in the Ford F-Series Super Duty pickup truck. Ford had expressed early interest in the JLTV, but could not meet the aggressive development timelines the Army required for an independent bid.

“We have worked hard over the last year to strengthen our team and our offer, bringing together the best of the defense and automotive industries,” said Ann Hoholick, BAE's vice president of amphibious and new programs, in a statement. “Ford products have a reputation for dependability and performance, even under challenging conditions. With their experience in commercial trucks, we see this as a great fit for our JLTV offer.”

Navistar turned heads last October when it unveiled the Saratoga light tactical vehicle at the Association of the U.S. Army show despite its partnership with BAE on a TD phase option. But Navistar was hedging its bets between the JLTV and the Humvee recap, opting to design a vehicle that filled the gap between the two sets of specs. The changes to the JLTV requirements and the axing of the Humvee recap program provided Navistar the opportunity to submit the Saratoga to the EMD competition, with minor adjustments such as power-generation capabilities and a reduction in weight.

General Tactical Vehicles (GTV), a joint venture between Humvee manufacturer AM General and General Dynamics Land Systems, was selected as the third TD phase participant. Its EMD proposal, the JLTV Eagle, offers a double-V hull design based on the German army's Eagle IV (manufactured by GD's Swiss subsidiary Mowag), which is used in Afghanistan.

“With the Eagle, we offer a modified, non-developmental, low-risk vehicle with inherent manufacturing readiness that is built for program success and an accelerated path to production,” said Mark Roualet, chairman of GTV's board of directors, in a statement. “We have a team . . . that is offering a mature, fully transportable and highly reliable solution that is ready now.”

In addition to its involvement with GTV's entry, AM General submitted an independent bid. The Blast Resistant Vehicle-Off Road (BRV-O) was a last-minute entrant into the bidding process, though Chris Vanslager, AM General's executive director of business development and defense programs, said work on the BRV-O would not detract from participation in the GTV entry. “Once we received the final [RFPs] with the requirements the government identified, we determined that we had multiple approaches to satisfying the requirements,” Vanslager said. AM General offers in-house engine, transmission and vehicle production and more than 50 years of experience with light tactical vehicles.

The only EMD bidder not involved in a TD phase team, Oshkosh Defense, put forward the Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle, or L-ATV. Oshkosh wants to apply the experience and lessons learned from the Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV), which was developed to counter IEDs and landmines but has drawn criticism in some quarters for being too large and heavy.

“We learned a lot not just with the development of the M-ATV, but with the underbody protection kit for the M-ATV,” Rob Messina, vice president of defense engineering, said in a recent interview. “What we had with JLTV was the opportunity for a clean-slate approach. We have developed a very well-protected solution.”

While the Humvee will still be used for homeland defense and logistics support, and the MRAP will remain available for route clearance, for now the JLTV is where the Defense Department is placing its bets. “The major modernization effort for the Army when it comes to tactical wheeled vehicles is with the JLTV,” said Col. Mark Barbosa, division chief for force development logistics.

William Graveline, assistant director for the Government Accountability Office's Acquisition and Sourcing Management Team, suggests that developing better protection capabilities that do not add weight to vehicles will be crucial.

Nevertheless, the intensity and breadth of the JLTV competition suggests that the tactical wheeled vehicle sector is entering an age of austerity in good shape.

buglerbilly
15-05-12, 01:53 PM
AM General's JLTV Candidate to be Unveiled In Warren

(Source: AM General LLC; issued May 14, 2012)



LIVONIA, Mich. --- AM General LLC will exhibit its Blast-Resistant Vehicle – Off Road (BRV-O) for the first time at the Defense Industrial Base Expo of the National Defense Industrial Association in Warren on May 15-16.

AM General, whose Engineering and Product Development Center is based in Livonia, announced in March it is backing two separate proposals for the Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program. BRV-O is based on more than a decade of the company's own investments in research, development and testing for the next-generation light tactical military vehicle.

BRV-O features a crew capsule and modular armor already proven effective in government-supervised blast testing. This AM General design can be readily adapted to future changes in U.S. military missions, enemy threats and new protection technologies as they emerge. BRV-O also features a self-leveling suspension system, a C4ISR backbone with open-standard networked architecture and clustered super-computing power, and other advanced components. These and other mature subsystems make BRV-O a highly mobile and versatile platform that meets or exceeds 100 percent of JLTV EMD phase evaluation criteria including protection, performance, payload, transportability, reliability and affordability.

The lightweight, fuel efficient and high performance Optimizer 3200 engine powering BRV-O also will be exhibited at the expo, along with other products of General Engine Products and General Transmission Products, subsidiaries of AM General. The six-cylinder, 3.2 liter, sequentially-turbocharged engine is rated at 300 horsepower and 500 lb-ft of torque. GEP will also introduce its proposed solution for the Next Generation Combat Engine based on Optimizer 3200 technology.

AM General designs, engineers, manufactures, supplies and supports specialized vehicles for commercial and military customers with more than six decades of experience meeting the changing needs of the defense and automotive industries. The AM General business units include two wholly-owned subsidiaries, General Engine Products, a diesel engine manufacturer, and General Transmission Products, an automatic transmission manufacturer. AM General is supported by approximately 1,500 employees at major facilities in Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio, and a strong supplier base that stretches across 43 states.

-ends-

buglerbilly
22-05-12, 10:45 PM
Navistar, Indigen Armor, SAIC Unveil Special Operations Tactical Vehicle



Navistar Defense, LLC, Indigen Armor and SAIC today unveiled the team's Special Operations Tactical Vehicle for the U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV) 1.1 program. The vehicle, on display this week at the Special Operations Forces Industry Conference in Tampa, Fl., is built on Indigen Armor's proven Non-Standard Tactical Truck (NSTT) platform and designed to be its modular and overt tactical equivalent.

The team's Special Operations Tactical Vehicle is transportable in an armored and mission-ready state on a M/CH-47 helicopter. The vehicle is designed for maximum off-road speed and mobility for a variety of terrain found in desert, jungle, mountain and arctic environments and incorporates a full government furnished Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) suite.

"Our GMV offering incorporates the expertise of three very strong companies," said Archie Massicotte, president, Navistar Defense. "Together we have a sophisticated design ready now that meets transportability and mature platform requirements while providing unprecedented mobility."

The Special Operations Tactical Vehicle chassis, suspension, powertrain and armored occupant safety cell were engineered specifically to carry large payloads across rough landscapes in 3-man, 5-man and 7-man variants. The scalable armor packages meet multiple threat levels and accommodate a variety of low-profile and overt tactical body styles which allow the vehicle's profile to be changed at the crew level.

"As former special operators, we have first-hand knowledge of how critical vehicle mobility and transportability are to SOCOM missions," said John Choate, president of Indigen Armor and former Navy SEAL. "This knowledge helped us bring to the table a mature, purpose-built and tested tactical vehicle platform when developing our team's GMV 1.1 offering."

Navistar's world-class truck and engine integration capabilities and Indigen Armor's unique understanding of performance specifications are further strengthened by SAIC. The company will provide integrated logistics support in addition to a full C4ISR suite.

"We have added to our already robust GMV offering by incorporating our expertise in integrating C4ISR systems and life-cycle support efficiencies in from the very start," said Glenn San Giacomo, SAIC senior vice president and business unit general manager. "Coupled with our high-performance supply chain management solutions, our offering results in outstanding logistics response times and the highest level of reliability, while reducing life cycle costs."

Source : Navistar International Corp.

Published on ASDNews: May 22, 2012

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-42898/Navistar,_Indigen_Armor,_SAIC_Unveil_Special_Opera tions_Tactical_Vehicle.htm#ixzz1vdZlRize

buglerbilly
23-05-12, 12:04 PM
Via Soldier Systems blog............

SOLIC – Polaris Defense Non-Pneumatic Tire

May 22nd, 2012



The Polaris Defense Non-Pneumatic Tire doesn’t go flat. It makes a great companion for their MRZR 2 & 4 all terrain vehicles.



www.polarisdefense.com

buglerbilly
23-05-12, 11:00 PM
Via Soldier Systems blog........

SOLIC – Polaris MRZR4

May 23rd, 2012



The MRZR4 boasts 88 horsepower with a top speed of over 60 mph. Offering 14″ of suspension travel and 12″ of ground clearance, it is CV22 compatible. The cab frames fold in order to gain the needed clearance for the Osprey’s cabin.



The seats incorporate 4-point harnesses and are designed to accommodate an operator in full kit.



The cargo area is modular and will accept 2 seats, 2 longitudinal litters or simply cargo.

Look for more info soon.

www.polaris.com

buglerbilly
24-05-12, 11:28 AM
More on this...........

New Special Operations Tactical Vehicle bid unveiled

24 May 2012 - 7:59 by the Shephard News Team



Navistar Defense, Indigen Armor and SAIC have unveiled the team's Special Operations Tactical Vehicle bid for the US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV) 1.1 programme. The vehicle, unveiled on 22 May, 2012, is built on Indigen Armor's Non-Standard Tactical Truck (NSTT) platform and designed to be its modular and overt tactical equivalent.

To meet programme requirements, the Special Operations Tactical Vehicle is transportable in an armoured and mission-ready state on an M/CH-47 helicopter. The vehicle is designed for maximum off-road speed and mobility for a variety of terrain found in desert, jungle, mountain and arctic environments and incorporates a full government furnished Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) suite, according to a team press release.

The vehicle’s chassis, suspension, powertrain and armoured occupant safety cell were engineered specifically to carry large payloads across rough landscapes in 3-man, 5-man and 7-man variants. According to the team, the scalable armour packages meet multiple threat levels and accommodate a variety of low-profile and overt tactical body styles which allow the vehicle's profile to be changed at the crew level.

Indigen Armor will provide integrated logistics support in addition to a full C4ISR suite.

buglerbilly
29-05-12, 09:51 AM
More on the POLARIS vehicle...............via Soldier Systems..............

Polaris MRZR

May 29th, 2012


Published on May 23, 2012 by adstactical

Polaris Defense introduces the MRZR™ 2 & MRZR™ 4 ultra-light tactical vehicle. Designed and engineered from the ground-up by Polaris Defense, this vehicle was built for today's operator.

- 60" vehicle height with the tool-less collapsing roll-cage
- MRZR™ 4 Carries 1 or 2 litters longitudinally
- 88 hp 875 cc Polaris Prostar engine
- Optional rearward seating
- Blackout drive and IR capable
- Keyless ignition

The new MRZR from Polaris Defense is available in both 2 and 4-seat models along with optional rearward facing seats in the rear cargo area. Additionally, the MRZR 4 can accommodate 1 or 2 litters longitudinally in place of cargo or seats.



Powered by a 88 hp 875 cc Polaris Prostar engine it incorporates a keyless ignition. It’s a full height (60”) vehicle but has a tool-less collapsing roll-cage to fit into the CV-22′s cabin. And with a 60″ width, the RZR maintains a low CG so you won’t gave to worry about rolling over while negotiating a turn. For off-road performance, Polaris provides electronic power steering as well as a winch to get you out of a jam. To top off its tactical accessories it includes blackout drive lights and is IR capable.



The Polaris MRZR 2 & 4 are available for unit and agency orders from ADSinc.com.

buglerbilly
30-05-12, 01:46 AM
Poland Eyes Light Strike Vehicles for Spec Ops in Afghanistan

May. 29, 2012 - 05:16PM

By JAROSLAW ADAMOWSKI

First customer for Polaris and its new vehicle?

WARSAW — The Polish Ministry of Defense has announced it is inviting offers from manufacturers to supply the Polish armed forces with 118 Light Strike Vehicles (LSVs).

The four-wheel-drive vehicles are expected to carry a crew of at least three and weigh a maximum of 1.7 tons, the ministry’s Armament Inspectorate said in a statement.

The new LSVs are intended to be supplied to the country’s Special Operations Forces, which are currently deployed to the Afghan province of Ghazni.

Under the ministry’s preliminary requirements, the vehicles must have a minimum range of 497 miles, a maximum speed of at least 63 mph on-road, and an off-road maximum speed of at least 38 mph. The LSVs are also to be equipped with blast-absorbing seats and four-point seat belts.

Offers, including the vehicles’ technical specification, eventual delivery schedule, price tag and utilization costs, are to be submitted to the Armament Inspectorate by June 6, 2012, at the latest, the statement said.

The LSVs are to be fitted with 7.62mm or 12.7mm machine guns, and 40mm automatic grenade launchers, according to the Polish ministry.

buglerbilly
31-05-12, 11:26 AM
Via DiD..........

QinietiQ’s Q-Net: Fabric Beats Rocket

May 30, 2012 15:30 EDT


M-ATV w. Q-Net

No vehicle “cage armor” provides 100% protection, but even 50% effectiveness will save lives. QinetiQ’s Q-Net uses high-tech fabrics to replace metal cage armor, and protect against incoming rockets. In May 2012, QinetiQ North America in Watham, MA received an $11.7 million firm-fixed-price contract for 420 “rocket-propelled grenade defeating nets,” 420 battle damage Q-net kits, and proprietary tubes. Work will be performed in Franklin, MA, with an estimated completion date of Dec 13/12. One bid was solicited, with 1 bid received by the U.S. Army Contracting Command in Warren, MI (W56HAV-12-C-0240).

This isn’t the USA’s first Q-Net purchase. Kits have been created for HMMWVs, and for RG-31 and M-ATV blast-resistant vehicles, and fielded to the front lines, but contracts to date had been handed out through the vehicle manufacturers. That isn’t entirely unreasonable, since any cage armor must be produced as a specific kit that protects a given vehicle type. As for Q-Net…

Q-Net’s principles are similar to equipment like Tarian’s QuickSafe and TNO’s Constrictor. The fabric net surrounds most exposed areas of the vehicle, and is tough enough that an incoming rocket can’t just rip right through. Hitting the net may prevent the rocket’s piezo-electric fuze from detonating, or otherewise impair its operation enough to save the vehicle’s crew. That principle holds true for any cage armor, but Q-Net and its contemporaries offer a product that’s significantly lighter than bar armor, including BAE’s aluminum LROD cage armor. That lightness allows in-field repairs, and ensures that the fabric nets can easily be used to “patch” removed metal or fabric cage armor panels.

Q-Net was jointly developed by QinetiQ North America, DARPA, and the US Office of Naval Research. It was not the first such product in the marketplace, but it appears to be the US military’s choice.

buglerbilly
04-06-12, 02:50 PM
Next Stage for Hawkei Army Vehicle

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued June 3, 2012)

Minister for Defence Stephen Smith and Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today announced that the Government has allocated just over $38 million to further develop and test the next generation Hawkei Light Protected Mobility Vehicle.

The Hawkei is a mobile, 7-tonne fighting vehicle that offers a high level of protection for the soldiers inside it.

In December 2011 the Government announced that Thales Australia’s Hawkei had been selected as the preferred vehicle for the development and testing under Stage 2 of the Manufactured and Supported in Australia (MSA) option under LAND 121 Phase 4.

ThalesAustraliais currently manufacturing Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicles at its factory inBendigo. This manufacturing capability, and the skills of the workforce, is an important national security capability which will be required for the production of the Hawkei.

Defence has now reached an agreement with ThalesAustraliato develop six prototype Hawkei vehicles for further testing. The first of these will be delivered later this year.

Throughout 2013, the Hawkei prototypes will undergo a range of testing and evaluation including user assessments, capability and reliability testing to evaluate the ability of the vehicle to deliver the capability required by Australian troops.

ThalesAustraliawill be required to meet technical performance, cost and schedule commitments in the development of the Hawkei vehicle. Progress in the development of the Hawkei will be assessed against a series of milestones that will determine the maturing design of the vehicle.

If Thales is successful in developing a suitable vehicle at an affordable cost in Stage 2, the Government will consider the merits of buying the Hawkei vehicles to meet Army’s Protected Mobility Vehicle (Light) requirement of LAND 121 Phase

Final Government approval of the project is expected to be able to be considered by 2015.

On current plans, manufacture of Bushmasters atBendigois expected to be completed before the end of 2013.

In order to retain critical skills inBendigowhile the design of the Hawkei is finalised and proven, the Government has agreed to explore the purchase of additional Bushmaster vehicles.

-ends-

buglerbilly
04-06-12, 03:37 PM
Couple of new images of the Hawkei Speicla Ops vehicle/variant............

buglerbilly
07-06-12, 01:55 PM
Contract Concluded On 110 Protected Transport Vehicles, Payload 5 Tons

(Source: German defense procurement office, BWB; issued June 6, 2012)


Similar to this trialled here................

On 14 May 2012, the Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement (BWB) and Daimler AG concluded a contract on the delivery of a total of 110 protected transport vehicles, payload 5 tons, manufacturer’s designation ZETROS.

The contract was signed by Mr Thomas Wardecki, Vice President of the BWB, and Mr Hans-Joachim Bayer, Daimler AG head of sales (division authorities), in the presence of BWB project group and Daimler AG representatives.

The ZETROS 5 t has been projected by the BWB. In comparison to the transport vehicles of the same payload used on Bundeswehr operations, it features significantly improved protection in the field of ballistics and against mines and improvised explosive devices (IED). An NBC overpressure system and the possibility to mount a remotely operated weapon station additionally increase vehicle protection and, consequently, soldier protection.

The capabilities of the vehicle depending on use and mission.

The first 25 ZETROS 5 t vehicles are to be delivered already in 2012 for soldier training and operations. Fielding of all 110 vehicles is planned to be completed by mid-2014.

-ends-

buglerbilly
08-06-12, 04:14 PM
This is the beastie NOT the pic above.................

geof
09-06-12, 08:00 AM
Couple of new images of the Hawkei Speicla Ops vehicle/variant............


Too late for these now the Cat's have arrived .. ?? I would imagine that some of the SAS people would have rathered these instead ..

buglerbilly
10-06-12, 02:18 AM
Too late for these now the Cat's have arrived .. ?? I would imagine that some of the SAS people would have rathered these instead ..

Not really, these don't exist as of now, this is just a very slick 3D CAD presentation..............and it doesn't carry as much as a Supacat. Would some go amiss? Probably not, IF they work as promised and current trials with the full-blown Hawkei will prove/disprove that.

buglerbilly
10-06-12, 03:40 AM
Canada Selects Textron Systems for Tactical Armored patrol Vehicles (TAPV)

Tamir Eshel June 9, 2012 22:30


The Canadian MOD Selected Textron Systems Canada to deliver the TAPV

Textron Systems Canada Inc has been selected by the Canadian government for the Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) program. The contract provides that the Textron TAPV Team, led by Textron Systems Canada, together with Textron Marine & Land Systems and Rheinmetall Canada, will manufacture 500 vehicles, with an option for up to 100 more.
The TAPV contract has a net value of $603.4 million CAD, with an additional five-year in-service support contract of $105.4 million CAD. The first vehicle is scheduled to be delivered to the Canadian Army in July 2014 and the last delivery is scheduled for March 2016.

The new Tactical Armored patrol Vehicles (TAPV) will enter production in 2014 and is expected to become operational by 2016, gradually replacing the RG-31 currently in service. The vehicle Textron Systems has offered is a ‘beefed up’ variant of the M-1117 ASV used by the U.S. Army

“A vehicle like the TAPV will not only give us unmatched reconnaissance ability and manoeuvrability, whatever our mission and wherever we are sent, it will also provide the highest level of safety and protection to the men and women we assign to crew it,” Brig.-Gen. Christopher Thurrott, commander of Land Force Atlantic Area Said. Of the 500, about 200 will be used as reconnaissance vehicles, while the remainder will be personnel carriers. The TAPV can, however, be reconfigured for various roles.

The TAPV is specifically designed to protect soldiers from land mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) — major causes of death for Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan.

Major Carl Gendron, one of the experts who evaluated the four competing bids for the contract, said the TAPV is a tough vehicle.


Published on Jun 8, 2012 by TextronTAPV
No description available.

“We have learned many lessons through our combat operations in Afghanistan, one of which being the importance of armoured vehicles in protecting our soldiers from today’s threats in operations,” Gendron said. “It has sustained 10 kilograms of explosive under the wheels and eight under the hull. So it makes it extremely resilient to IEDs.”

The Canadian Textron TAPV team includes Kongsberg Protech Systems Canada (London, ON) to deliver the dual-weapon Protector remote operated weapon station, Rheinmetall Canada (St. Jean sur Richelieu, P.Q.) and EODC – Engineering Office Deisenroth Canada (Ottawa, ON). As the program is ramped up Canadian companies including Michelin (Waterville, NS), General Kinetics (Brampton, ON), Evraz North America (Regina, SK), SED Systems (Saskatoon, SK), Ontario Drive and Gear (New Hamburg, ON), Mobile Climate Control (Vaughan, ON) and others, integrated into the vehicle’s supply chain.

Neil Rutter, general manager of Textron Systems Canada, said the new vehicle has been in development for five years. He promised they would be delivered on-time. “We will deliver a vehicle that will provide the Canadian Army with an unmatched blend of protection, power, mobility and growth potential,” Rutter said. The vehicles are one component of $5-billion in upgrades to the army’s combat vehicles announced in 2009.


Textron Systems TAPV

buglerbilly
11-06-12, 10:28 AM
Eurosatory 2012: GDELS launches 6x6 version of the Eagle

11 June 2012 - 7:30 by Tony Skinner in Paris



General Dynamics European Land Systems (GDELS) has unveiled a 6x6 variant of its Eagle light tactical vehicle at the Eurosatory exhibition in Paris on 11 June.

Created by combining the DURO 6x6 chassis, driveline and suspension with the Eagle 4x4 hull, the enlarged variant features protected cabins for two, four or five crew members, depending on the particular mission module chosen.

According to the company, the Eagle 6x6 offers a payload of up to 6,000 kg and in troop carrier configuration can accommodate up to 14 troops.

In addition, the new vehicle features ‘permanent all-wheel drive, automatic Torsen differentials, automatic transmission and automatic tire pressure control system allow fatigue-proof and secure driving under all conditions’.

GDELS noted that the development of the Eagle 6x6 allowed it to offer a ‘true family of vehicles’ with the flexibility to accommodate two to 11 soldiers across a range of missions.

General Dynamics also used the show to display the first of 12 Swiss Army Piranha IIIC vehicles fitted with a CBRN suite developed by Thales.

The vehicle is able to monitor large areas, identify CBRN threats and mark contaminated zones. It is equipped with detection probes, employing a particle monitor and telescopic arm to measure radiation on the ground.

The company noted that the ‘double-wheel’ sampling system made it possible to identify ground contamination while on the move.

GDELS has also delivered 12 DURO 6x6 mobile field laboratory vehicles to the Swiss Army, which feature three different CBRN reconnaissance mission modules developed by Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles (RMMV).

‘These highly efficient laboratories, which can be quickly deployed to the operational theatre, contain all the required devices for thorough evaluation of data in the event of CBRN threat situations,’ the company said in a statement.

‘In the event of a contamination, the crew can embark and disembark through a sluice in the rear of the vehicle for decontamination. These mobile field laboratories enable a rapid, highly technological and sustainable CBRN defence in the military as well as in the civil disaster control or against terrorist attacks.’

buglerbilly
11-06-12, 10:29 AM
I wonder which programme this was put together for..............

buglerbilly
11-06-12, 10:31 AM
Ditto...........cheeky ferkers have drawn a Roo on the side, must be a Tourist!

buglerbilly
11-06-12, 10:33 AM
Last one............

buglerbilly
11-06-12, 11:45 AM
Another shot of Textron's TAPV successful candidate..............

buglerbilly
11-06-12, 02:36 PM
Supacat SPV400 Production Standard Vehicle Achieves 96% Reliability



Eurosatory, Paris - Stand: Hall 6 C320

06:59 GMT, June 11, 2012 Dunkeswell, Devon, UK | At Eurosatory 2012 Supacat is exhibiting the latest production standard Supacat Protected Vehicle 400 (SPV400), which offers improved reliability and handling after having completed over 21,000km of trials, during which its reliability level has increased to 96%.

These improvements were demonstrated in March at Millbrook Proving Ground where the SPV400 (Vehicle 7) performed robustly in pre-feasibility trials for the UK Ministry of Defence’s Multi Role Vehicle –Protected (MRV-P) requirement.

Supacat has focussed on maturing the design since 2010 when it was assessed for the UK MoD’s requirement for a Light Protected Patrol Vehicle (LPPV). The SPV400 is one of only two vehicles in the 7.5 ton protected light patrol vehicle class to have met the UK MoD’s stringent requirements.

“The SPV400 is proving itself as a robust light protected patrol vehicle and is attracting interest in the international market”, said Nick Ames, Managing Director, Supacat Ltd.

A light patrol vehicle in the 7.5 ton class, the SPV400 carries a crew of six (2 +4) and combines an integrated blast and ballistic protection system, including a protected all composite crew pod and V-shaped hull. Using the latest composite and ceramic armour systems, the crew pod is constructed as a separate module, sealed off from potential secondary projectiles, such as kit and electronic devices, which are housed in a rear compartment. All seats are mine blast protected.

The SPV400 has exceptional all terrain, high mobility performance and is capable of speeds up to 80mph on the desert plain.

A modular and future-proofed design allows the SPV400 to be upgraded to meet evolving threats and requirements. The V shaped hull protects the crew in an under-belly mine strike scenario, while the modular approach enables the SPV400 to be repaired in theatre following mine blast incidents by replacing the damaged module(s).

Air suspension provides troops with a smooth ride, reducing crew fatigue and conventional steering reduces complexity.

Supacat is also exhibiting the Wildcat light strike vehicle and the HMT Series (Jackal) at Eurosatory. In April this year the Australian Defence Material Organisation (DMO) selected Supacat as Preferred Bidder for the Special Operations Vehicle element of the Project Definition and Evaluation phase (PD&E) of JP2097 Ph 1B (REDFIN). Supacat’s bid offers the latest version of its Special Forces HMT Extenda vehicle.

buglerbilly
11-06-12, 10:40 PM
A First Sighting of Hawkei Vehicle in Europe

Posted by gcouteau | June 11th, 2012 | Combat Vehicles, European Defense, Uncategorized

PARIS –- A Thales Hawkei armored tactical vehicle developed for the Australian Army went on display June 11 for the first time in Europe at the Eurosatory show.

Thales signed May 23 a 38 million Australian dollar contract to continue development of the 7-ton vehicle under a prototype-to-production deal, said Paul Harris, Thales Australia director for strategy, sales and marketing. The development contract covers six units.

The Hawkei is lighter than the larger Bushmaster vehicle, which carries 10 crew and has operated in Iraq and Afghanistan, but is designed to offer a similar level of protection, Harris said.
The Hawkei is expected to enter production around 2015.

The Hawkei can carry six crew and 3 tons of payload.

The Australian government plans to acquire 1,300 new light protected vehicles to replace the Land Rover fleet, under the LAND 121 phase 4 program, Thales said in a statement.

buglerbilly
11-06-12, 10:50 PM
Eurosatory 2012: Thales brings Hawkei to Europe

11 June 2012 - 19:55 by Tony Skinner in Paris



Thales Australia used the Eurosatory exhibition in Paris on 11 June to display its Hawkei light protected vehicle in Europe for the first time.

Developed for an Australian Defence Force (ADF) requirement for 1,300 new vehicles to replace its current Land Rover fleet, the 7 tonne Hawkei is designed to be easily deployable but still providing high levels of protection.

Chris Jenkins, Thales Australia’s CEO, told reporters that in delivering six Hawkei prototypes as part of Australia’s LAND 121 phase 4 programme, the company was providing a tactical vehicle with the same protection levels of the Bushmaster protected mobility vehicle.

‘This has the highest level of protection for a seven-tonne vehicle. What we have been able to achieve is a level of survivability and protection that you get with a 15-tonne vehicle like the Bushmaster. We have realty taken that as our baseline,’ Jenkins said.

Australia had signed an agreement with the US Army to provide funding into its Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programme, but in December 2011 decided to move forward with the Hawkei instead.

The vehicle features a B-kit armour application developed by Plasan, which can be installed in less than 30 minutes, without the need to use special tools. As the crew cabin is a steel hull bolted together, it can be reconfigured and upgraded without changing the shape of the vehicle.

The vehicle on display features the Vehicle Electronic Architecture (VEA), which is a modular, open architecture developed as a joint development programme between Thales in France, the UK, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Australia.

Paul Harris, director of sales and marketing for protected vehicles, said the six prototypes would be delivered to the ADF by August next year for further evaluation.

The vehicles will be produced at Thales’ Bendigo, Victoria, facility, where Bushmaster production is currently expected to carry through to 2015. Of the 1,300, 700 will be the four door variant with room for five/six and 600 in utility configuration.

Harris noted that the vehicle has been qualified with a gross vehicle weight of 10-tonnes, providing scope for future weight growth.

He highlighted the vehicle’s unique power train, which places the engine and transmission side-by-side in the front of the vehicle, preventing the transmission being forced into the cabin in the event of an IED blast. This provides more internal volume and means the only components under the vehicle are one drive shaft and the exhaust.

The hull, meanwhile, is in a shallow V, which both absorbs and deflects the effects of an IED blast.

buglerbilly
11-06-12, 10:57 PM
Brits militarize Jeep for spec ops duty

By Michael Hoffman Monday, June 11th, 2012 1:40 pm



PARIS — A British company took the classic Jeep Wrangler and militarized it in hopes of selling it to foreign armies unveiling its special forces variant Monday here at Eurosatory 2012.

Jankel started out selling sports cars in the 1950s and then specialized limousines to the ultra rich until 15 years ago when their clientele started dying off. Since then, they’ve entered the military market and haven’t looked back.

The company partnered with Chrysler, builder of Jeep, in 2008 to help it sell the iconic American Jeep to foreign armies. Now, they look to challenge Mercedes Benz and Land Rover to supply Europe’s armies with their future tactical wheeled fleets. It’s Europe’s answer to America’s Humvee.

Jankel’s hope is that European armies squeezed by shrinking budgets will look to the cheaper Jeep versus Mercedes Benz. Ghana and Uruguay have already bought variants of the Jeep J8 family of vehicles for UN missions.

Switzerland has started to test Jankel’s personnel and cargo carrier variant. Jeep J8 features six variants to include the light patrol and border patrol; personnel carrier; cargo and communications; military armored; ambulance; and pickup/chassis cab.

The Jeeps feature seats U.S. soldiers should recognize. Jankel’s has installed their blast limiting attenuation seats into vehicles like the Oshkosh Mine Resistant Ambush Protected All Terrain Vehicle the U.S. Army drives in Afghanistan.

The special forces variant called the Pegasus is the sexiest member of the family. It is named after the Pegasus Bridge crossing the Caen Canal the British 6th Airborne Division wrenched from the Germans in the invasion of Normandy in World War II. Lets just say Newman might have met a different fate at the end of Jurassic Park if he was driving this Jeep variant with two .50 caliber machine guns mounted to the Jeep’s roof and backseat.

Pegasus was built to load inside a CH-47 Chinook with the ability to unload it in 15 seconds. The Jeep is powered by a direct injection, common rail, turbo charged, intercooled diesel engine. The 24 volt electrical system features one NATO jump socket with two USB sockets.

Pegasus built the frame to fit inside the Chinook. The frame is 201 inches long, 79 inches wide, 72 inches tall with an 11 inch ground clearance. It has a curb weight of 6,610 pounds and a potential payload of 3,310 pounds.

The off road capabilities of the Pegasus have been beefed up to take on the stress of a special operations capability set. It can scale a 60% gradient and a 40% side slope with the driver only.

Pegasus can carry four special operators and maybe a fifth in a pinch. Unit commanders can add an extended range fuel tank as well as underslung airlift solutions.

Lorne Stoddart, a commercial manager for Jankel, said they have targeted seven countries interested in Pegasus. He offered Holland as an example of one country who will have requirements to buy a vehicle like Pegasus.

Andrew Jankel, Jankel’s chairman, said his company chose not to bid for the U.S. Special Operations Command’s Ground Mobility Vehicle program because of the constantly changing requirements. He would prefer to let the BAE Systems and General Dynamics of the world fight that out.

Of course, if Congress can’t get its act together and avoid sequestration, then all bets are off and U.S. special operators might soon find themselves inside the Pegasus.

Doohan
12-06-12, 06:22 AM
Too late for these now the Cat's have arrived .. ?? I would imagine that some of the SAS people would have rathered these instead ..

Seriously doubt it. If this is like everything else Thales makes it will spend the first few years sitting in the yard waiting for spares.

That aside Not sure it will fit inside a CH-47 as an internal load or that it will be able to lift the required payload for some missions

buglerbilly
12-06-12, 11:22 AM
Rheinmetall Displays RPG-Protected Cabin for the HX2 High Mobility Truck

Tamir Eshel June 11, 2012 22:57


Above:Rheinmetall-HX2 showing the cabin RPG protection by flexible net and slat armor. A more advanced active defense system is also suggested for this application. Photo: Tamir Eshel, Defense-Update

At Eurosatory 2012 Rheinmetall Defence is showing the HX2 ‘Extreme Mobility Truck System’, fitted with a protected cabin and hard-kill protection system, providing good ballistic and mine / IED protection, a combination of statistical counter-RPG armor, and an effective active-protection system (ADS) against RPG attack. The cabin is also surrounded by a ballistic protecting net, adding statistical protection against IEDs. This unique close-in protection ADS system was successfully demonstrated in 2011 The HX2 is an advanced version of the HX family of trucks made by MAN Military Vehicles. This 6×6 cargo version is powered with a 440 Hp MAN diesel engine driving 16 tyres, providing high mobility off-road. The HX2 represents Rheinmetall’s approach to the future core of a fleet of high mobility, protected transport vehicles that can be deployed worldwide.

To carry the excessive load of the protected cabin, the specially designed front axle loads up to 11 tons. Rheinmetall has designed the armored cab and qualified it for military use.

buglerbilly
12-06-12, 12:57 PM
BAE Systems Displays Latest Mine Protected Vehicle At Eurosatory

(Source: BAE Systems; issued June 11, 2012)



PARIS --- BAE Systems is displaying the company’s latest in mine protected vehicles, the RG35 family of vehicles, at the Eurosatory exhibition this week. This family of vehicles meets today’s battlefield requirements by being adaptable for future technologies and fulfilling a variety of roles.

“The new RG35 vehicle is a direct response to lessons learned from operations in Iraq and Afghanistan – soldiers need an effective level of protection without sacrificing mobility, payload and firepower,” said Chris Chambers, vice president and general manager of BAE Systems Tactical Wheeled Vehicles. “We’ve responded to the needs of soldiers and are now able to tailor the vehicle’s capability to specific requirements because of the design’s adaptability.”

The vehicle is available in 4x4 and 6x6 configurations. The RG35 4x4 is a mine protected, multi-mission tactical wheeled vehicle that can easily be modified in a number of ways to transport cargo, conduct routine patrols or be outfitted for surveillance missions. The 6x6 version combines tactical mobility with a high level of survivability and high capacity volume under armour, offering a new class cross-over combat vehicle.

“The RG35 family of vehicles is a modern and dependable tactical wheeled vehicle family truly built for multiple mission types. No matter where or what the mission, getting troops home safely is what drives us when developing our vehicles,” said Johan Steyn, managing director of BAE Systems’ Land Systems South Africa. “We’ve integrated four decades of expertise and experience into this family of vehicles.”

The RG35 can be equipped with light and medium turrets, or with indirect fire weapons. The RG35 4x4 variant, on display at Eurosatory, will feature the light-weight Self Defence Remotely Operated Weapon (SD-ROW), which enables forces to engage hostile targets without exposing operators to harm during day and night.

-ends-

buglerbilly
12-06-12, 09:32 PM
More on this........

Eurosatory 2012: Jankel unveils Pegasus SOV

12 June 2012 - 12:24 by Tony Skinner in Paris



Jankel is targeting a number of European nations that have potential requirements for a new special forces tactical vehicle with the launch of its Pegasus Special Operations Vehicle (SOV) at the Eurosatory exhibition in Paris.

Described by the company as a ‘class-leading light tactical vehicle’, the Pegasus is based on the Jeep J8, but has been redesigned to be air-transportable by a CH-47 Chinook transport helicopter.

Jankel business development director Daniel Crosby said a number of upgrades to the vehicle made the Pegasus highly mobile, while the modular design allowed for greater customer flexibility.

‘There are a range of SOF vehicle type requirements that we have in mind and which we are aiming the vehicle at. We are looking to engage with those customers over the next few months,’ Crosby said, although he was unwilling to go into specifics.

Among the possible target countries is the Netherlands, which has stated ambitions to purchase a soft-topped, ‘Air-Transportable Tactical Vehicle’ that can be loaded into a CH-47D/F Chinook with full payload in place.

The Pegasus is designed to accommodate a range of weapon and C4I systems; the vehicle on display at the show was fitted with a C4I suite developed by Kongsberg.

Also on display was the hard-top Jeep J8 personnel and cargo carrier, which has recently undergone trials with the Swiss armed forces as they seek a replacement for their G-Class and Pinzgauer vehicles.

Crosby said that in replacing their main utility vehicle fleet, the Swiss could purchase as many as 3300 vehicles. Trials are currently taking place and a request for proposals is expected to be released for the project towards the end of the year.

The vehicle has been designed to carry out a wide-range of logistics roles. As well as seating the driver and front passenger, folding rear seats allow an additional crew of six or cargo transport, including a NATO pallet load.

Jankel also showcased a five-door soft-top variant, which was chosen by Ghana in a 22 vehicle order.

Jankel offers its various Jeep solutions through its subsidiary Jeep Government & Military Sales (JGMS), which is the official distributor of Jeep J8 4x4 vehicles to government, military and security customers.

Meanwhile, the company plans to use the DVD exhibition in Millbrook, UK, on 20 June to launch an armoured version of the new Toyota 200 series.

Crosby explained that the armour package had been developed through the company’s ‘hot form’ solution, which has resulted in only 36 pieces of armour for full protection, including one panel running down the length of the vehicle.

buglerbilly
12-06-12, 09:37 PM
More on this.........real pic and not a graphic.........

Eurosatory 2012: GDELS launches 6x6 version of the Eagle

11 June 2012 - 7:30 by Tony Skinner in Paris



General Dynamics European Land Systems (GDELS) has unveiled a 6x6 variant of its Eagle light tactical vehicle at the Eurosatory exhibition in Paris on 11 June.

Created by combining the DURO 6x6 chassis, driveline and suspension with the Eagle 4x4 hull, the enlarged variant features protected cabins for two, four or five crew members, depending on the particular mission module chosen.

According to the company, the Eagle 6x6 offers a payload of up to 6,000 kg and in troop carrier configuration can accommodate up to 14 troops.

In addition, the new vehicle features ‘permanent all-wheel drive, automatic Torsen differentials, automatic transmission and automatic tire pressure control system allow fatigue-proof and secure driving under all conditions’.

GDELS noted that the development of the Eagle 6x6 allowed it to offer a ‘true family of vehicles’ with the flexibility to accommodate two to 11 soldiers across a range of missions.

General Dynamics also used the show to display the first of 12 Swiss Army Piranha IIIC vehicles fitted with a CBRN suite developed by Thales.

The vehicle is able to monitor large areas, identify CBRN threats and mark contaminated zones. It is equipped with detection probes, employing a particle monitor and telescopic arm to measure radiation on the ground.

The company noted that the ‘double-wheel’ sampling system made it possible to identify ground contamination while on the move.

GDELS has also delivered 12 DURO 6x6 mobile field laboratory vehicles to the Swiss Army, which feature three different CBRN reconnaissance mission modules developed by Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles (RMMV).

‘These highly efficient laboratories, which can be quickly deployed to the operational theatre, contain all the required devices for thorough evaluation of data in the event of CBRN threat situations,’ the company said in a statement.

‘In the event of a contamination, the crew can embark and disembark through a sluice in the rear of the vehicle for decontamination. These mobile field laboratories enable a rapid, highly technological and sustainable CBRN defence in the military as well as in the civil disaster control or against terrorist attacks.’

buglerbilly
13-06-12, 11:10 AM
Navistar Goes Lighter, Offers Two Vehicles to International Market

Posted by Paul McLeary | June 13th, 2012 | Combat Vehicles, European Defense, Uncategorized


The MXT has been sold to the U.K.'s Ministry of Defence and the Canadian police. (Navistar photo)

Navistar rolled out two new vehicles for the international market this week, introducing variants of its Saratoga—which the company has submitted to the U.S. Army and Marine Corps in consideration for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program—and an international variant of its submission to the U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) for its Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV 1.1). Company officials said that Navistar formally submitted the GMV vehicle on June 12, and that USSOCOM has already tested an early model and approved its participation in the effort.

The Saratoga, the GMV, and their international models represent a new direction for the company. Largely known in military circles for it’s MAXXPro MRAP, these new vehicles now place Navistar in the light and medium vehicle marketplace, diversifying the truck maker’s offerings across the spectrum of future conflict said Pat MacArevey, vice president of government business.

Jim Grooms, the company’s director for fleet support said that the company has made the shift in order to better align itself with where it seems the market heading. “There was a time where everyone thought that blast protection required increasingly bigger, heavier vehicles,” he said. But armor technology has advanced so quickly in recent years that the company is able to offer MRAP-like protection on vehicles like the Saratoga, with a curb weight of about 14,000 lbs., as opposed to the 40,000 to 50,000 lb. MRAPs.

The company has also already sold roughly 400 MXT armored personnel carriers to the U.K., which are deployed in Afghanistan, but is looking to enter the international military vehicle market in a bigger way. “The international GMV is ready for export” said Grooms. The MXT has recently been sold to an unnamed Canadian police force as well, and the company is showcasing a S.W.A.T variant of the vehicle at its display.

Like several other companies, including Oshkosh, Navistar officials also say that they’re interested in pursuing the Canadian Medium Support Vehicle System (MSVS) program, which has been delayed several times. Grooms said that the company is interested in submitting its ATX 8×8 logistics truck to the Canadians once the program starts back up.

buglerbilly
14-06-12, 11:13 AM
BAE Systems to Provide More Armored Vehicles to Finland

Posted by Paul McLeary | June 13th, 2012 | Business, Combat Vehicles, European Defense, Uncategorized


BAE Systems photo

The Finnish Defence Forces have tapped BAE Systems to supply 25 more RG32M armored patrol vehicles in a €12.5 million ($15.7 million USD) deal that was announced on June 13. The contract builds on previous Finnish orders 26 vehicles in 2010, and 23 vehicles in 2011. Deliveries are scheduled to begin in April 2013 and are expected to be completed in July 2013.

The RG32M is an all-purpose, vehicle which the company says is “mine-hardened” as opposed “mine resistant,” since it is primarily intended to fulfill convoy support, infantry patrol and reconnaissance missions, and has not been outfitted with the heavier armor found on MRAP-type combat vehicles.

The Swedish Armed Forces currently operate 200 RG32M vehicles, some of which have taken part in operations in Afghanistan. In addition, the Irish Defence Forces operate 27 light tactical versions of the RG32, and the United Nations has also purchased several vehicles.

buglerbilly
14-06-12, 09:28 PM
Eurosatory 2012: Streit eyeing opportunities for Jaguar APC

14 June 2012 - 9:16 by Tony Skinner in Paris



The Streit Group is eyeing a number of opportunities for its new Jaguar APC, which was unveiled for the first time at the Eurosatory exhibition in Paris.

The 11-tonne 4x4 Jaguar, which can carry six occupants and features a modular design with a monocoque V-shaped hull, fills a gap in the company’s product line between the 13.5 tonne Typhoon and 5.5 tonne Spartan.

‘We were are a lot of inquiries for a vehicle that fell between the two so we developed a vehicle that was mobile but still provided high levels of protection. As production is carried out in the UAE we are also able to offer something that is very cost effective,’ Jonathan Bunday, regional sales manager for Streit UK, said.

The Jaguar has a top speed of 110km/h and offers STANAG 4569 Level 2 protection – although this can be upgraded to Level 3 or 4. The vehicle on display only finished assembly two weeks before the show.

Bunday noted that the Jaguar was an essential part of the company’s strategy to increase the proportion of sales in the military arena, which currently comprises only 30% of business, with the security sector accounting for the rest.

Among the opportunities Streit is pursuing with the Jaguar is an 80 vehicle requirement from the Saudi Ministry of the Interior. Meanwhile, in the first week of July an undisclosed eastern European nation will take the Typhoon through a series of tests to assess that vehicle.

The company also plans to launch a 6x6 variant in 2013 and an 8x8 APC the following year.

A key part of the Streit Group’s expansion is the opening of a new armoured vehicle factory at Ras Al Khaimah in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

The first phase of the 1.4 million square feet facility was completed in April with phases two and three scheduled to be completed by 2014.

The overall investment of $54.4 million in the facility will include the establishment of a glass factory, pre-fabrication facilities, expanded employee accommodation, fuelling stations, helipad, and manufacturing support.

buglerbilly
15-06-12, 03:06 PM
General Dynamics Land Systems Submits Proposal for U.S. Special Operations Ground Mobility Vehicle 1.1 Program

(Source: General Dynamics Land Systems; issued June 14, 2012)



STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich. --- General Dynamics Land Systems has submitted its proposal for the U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV 1.1) program. The proposal was delivered to Special Operations Command headquarters in Tampa, Fla. A sample vehicle in support of the bid was delivered on May 30.

The vehicle was designed and developed primarily at the General Dynamics Land Systems-Force Protection facility in Ladson, S.C. General Dynamics Land Systems is a business unit of General Dynamics (GD).

The General Dynamics Land Systems GMV 1.1 vehicle is optimized to increase operator and occupant protection and survivability. It meets the diverse and challenging missions that special operations demand, including transportability, mobility, modularity and technology.

The General Dynamics Land Systems GMV 1.1 is designed for internal fixed- and rotary-wing transport with a center-mounted engine that provides optimal weight distribution on the ground and inside an aircraft. It is a mission-ready, high performance vehicle that can be driven off an aircraft ready for use. The vehicle's modular technology is rapidly configurable for a variety of special operations missions and operating environments.

General Dynamics Land Systems performed extensive testing over a two-year period to validate the vehicle's design and performance. The vehicle passed user trials at the U.S. Army's Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona and the Nevada Automotive Test Center, and demonstrated its systems reliability during summer trials in the United Arab Emirates.

The GMV 1.1 program includes plans to acquire up to 1,300 vehicles for special operations missions with requirements for air transportability, weapons capabilities and high mobility. Contract award is expected by January 2013 with production expected to begin in 2013 and ending mid-2020.

-ends-

buglerbilly
15-06-12, 04:18 PM
Eurosatory 2012: UAE buys additional NIMR vehicles

15 June 2012 - 9:59 by Tony Skinner in Paris



Abu Dhabi-based Tawazun Holdings has showcased its NIMR multi-mission 4x4 at Eurosatory in Paris, as it ramps up deliveries of the vehicle to the UAE government.

In March the UAE Ministry of the Interior signed a contract for 200 NIMR vehicles, part of a wider order for more than 1,800 vehicles for the country’s armed forces.

Speaking to Shephard at the show, the CEO of Tawazun subsidiary Burkan, Saeed Al Mansouri, said that more than 500 NIMR vehicles had now been delivered to customers including Libya, Jordan, and Lebanon as well as the UAE.

‘The NIMR is a fully UAE designed and manufactured vehicle and the only thing that is not produced in the country is the engine and gearbox,’ Al Mansouri said.

He noted that the vehicles are available in both 4×4 and 6×6 variants and the modular design allows them to be configured for a variety of roles – including reconnaissance, border surveillance, command and control, medevac, and as a personnel carrier – but retain a common chassis for easier logistics and support.

The 4x4 version can have a single or double cabin, a weapons platform or personnel carrier hull while the 6x6 offers short, medium, or long wheel base variants. NIMR has partnered with DRS for the onboard C4I package.

Al Mansouri said the 300hp, 13.5 tonne 6x6 vehicle on display was able to haul a payload of up to five tonnes.

‘The vehicles have been extensively tested in the UAE but were also shipped to the UK for tests at Millbrook Proving Ground,’ he said.

While the armour protection is the equivalent to STANAG 4569 Level 1, add-on armour kits can bring that up to Level 3 or 4.

The expansion of NIMR sales is one part of a wider push by Tawazun to expand its activities, with the holding company looking to increase its 3000+ strong work force by 400 to 500 employees each year. As well as NIMR, the holding company controls ammunition, weapons, autonomous systems and manufacturing and assembly interests.


Lebanese Airborne Regiment NIMR II 4x4

buglerbilly
16-06-12, 01:06 AM
Another pic of the Streit JAGUAR.............there is something about this light APC/MRAP I like a lot................

buglerbilly
16-06-12, 02:25 AM
Pix of HAWKEI at Eurosatory 2012...........

buglerbilly
18-06-12, 12:00 PM
Navistar Husky Expands Capabilities for British Army

Posted by Andrew Chuter | June 15th, 2012

PARIS — Navistar Defense has built a light armored recovery version of its Husky vehicle for the British army in Afghanistan.

The U.S. vehicle maker has already supplied several hundred Husky tactical support platforms to the British for utility, command post and ambulance roles.

Last year, though, the British asked Navistar to add another capability to the Huskey lineup – a light recovery machine.

The previously unseen Huskey recovery platform could be at the upcoming DVD vehicle show in England next week, said company executives at Eurosatory.

The Husky is the British version of Navistar’s MXT.

The new vehicle includes winches and a crane and is aimed at improving light recovery capabilities in Afghanistan.

British light vehicle numbers are set to increase in the next few months as the new 7.5-ton Foxhound patrol machine enters service in Afghanistan in the coming months.

More than a dozen of the vehicles, designed by Force Protection Europe, have already been delivered to Camp Bastion, the main British base in Afghanistan.

Ministry of Defence sources said the vehicles are undertaking base protection and other light duties before being cleared for full operational service.

Force Protection has a launch order for 200 Foxhounds from the British.

buglerbilly
18-06-12, 12:21 PM
Foxhound arrives in Afghanistan

An Equipment and Logistics news article

17 Jun 12

The first of the British Army's new Foxhound vehicles have arrived in Afghanistan.


A Foxhound light protected patrol vehicle rolls off an RAF C-17 transport aircraft at Camp Bastion in Helmand, southern Afghanistan
[Picture: Sergeant Andy Reddy, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Foxhound is at the cutting edge of protected patrol vehicle technology and provides unprecedented levels of blast protection for its size and weight.

After being flown out from RAF Brize Norton in a C-17 aircraft, these patrol vehicles are currently undergoing final testing in the dusty and hot conditions of the Helmand desert before being deployed on operations later in the year.

Foxhound has been specifically designed and built in Britain to protect against the threats our troops face in Afghanistan. However, this is an agile and versatile vehicle that will be a mainstay in the Army for years to come.

See Related Links for video footage of the Foxhound light protected patrol vehicles during trials in the UK and arriving at Camp Bastion.


Foxhound vehicles are transported inside an RAF C-17 transport aircraft
[Picture: Sergeant Andy Reddy, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Being lighter and smaller than other protected vehicles such as Mastiff and Ridgback, Foxhound brings a whole new capability to the Army and is ideal for soldiers operating in mentoring and partnering roles as it makes it easier for them to engage with Afghan National Security Forces and the local Afghan population.

General Dynamics Land Systems: Force Protection Europe (GDLS:FPE), who produce Foxhound, have worked with engineers from the World Rally Championship, McLaren F1, Ricardo and BMW to incorporate Formula One racing technology so it has a top speed of 70mph (113km/h), but can still protect against improvised explosive devices thanks to its v-shaped hull.

The MOD is also able to confirm today that a £90m contract for an additional 100 Foxhounds has been signed. It means a total of 300 vehicles will now be delivered to the Army as part of a deal with GDLS:FPE worth £270m that is sustaining around 750 highly-skilled jobs across the UK.


A Foxhound light protected patrol vehicle in Afghanistan
[Picture: Sergeant Andy Reddy, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Other innovative design features mean that the Foxhound's engine can be removed and replaced in just 30 minutes and it can drive away from an ambush on only three wheels.

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said:

"Foxhound's arrival in Afghanistan is great news for our soldiers. This Government has spent £270m on 300 of these hi-tech, British-built vehicles to help keep our troops properly protected. Our servicemen and women deserve the best protection we can get them."

Chief of the General Staff, General Sir Peter Wall, said:

"Foxhound gives the British Army the very latest level of protection on operations. This has been a well-run programme that will play a key role in equipping the Army of 2020."

Raven22
18-06-12, 12:56 PM
^^ Good effort by the shooter to let go of the PLATT mount and have the Mag-58 pointing at his own head... I've sacked people for less.

Gubler, A.
18-06-12, 01:23 PM
^^ Good effort by the shooter to let go of the PLATT mount and have the Mag-58 pointing at his own head... I've sacked people for less.

Its the British Army so he's probably a territorial with 2 weeks training before being sent into theatre.

buglerbilly
18-06-12, 01:28 PM
Oh ye of little faith, he was checking the barrel to see if it was dirty.....................

buglerbilly
18-06-12, 01:46 PM
Foxhound Arrives In Afghanistan

(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued June 17, 2012)


MoD has signed a follow-on order worth £90 million for 100 additional Foxhound protected vehicles, it said as the first vehicle arrived in Afghanistan for final user trials.(MoD photo)

The first of the British Army’s new Foxhound vehicles have arrived in Afghanistan, the MoD has announced.

Foxhound is at the cutting edge of protected patrol vehicle technology and provides unprecedented levels of blast protection for its size and weight. After being flown out from RAF Brize Norton in a C-17 aircraft, these patrol vehicles are currently undergoing final testing in the dusty and hot conditions of the Helmand desert before being deployed on operations later in the year.

Foxhound has been specifically designed and built in Britain to protect against the threats our troops face in Afghanistan. However, this is an agile and versatile vehicle that will be a mainstay in the Army for years to come. Being lighter and smaller than other protected vehicles such as Mastiff and Ridgeback, Foxhound brings a whole new capability to the Army and is ideal for soldiers operating in mentoring and partnering roles as it makes it easier for them to engage with Afghan National Security Forces and the local Afghan population.

General Dynamics Land Systems: Force Protection Europe, who produce Foxhound, have worked with engineers from the World Rally Championship, McLaren F1, Ricardo and BMW to incorporate Formula One racing technology so it has a top speed of 70 mph but can still protect against IEDs thanks to its v-shaped hull.

The MoD is also able to confirm today that a £90m contract for an additional 100 Foxhound has been signed. It means a total of 300 vehicles will now be delivered to the Army as part of a deal with GDLS:FPE worth £270m that is sustaining around 750 highly-skilled jobs across the UK.

Other innovative design features mean that the Foxhound’s engine can be removed and replaced in just 30 minutes and it can drive away from an ambush on only three wheels.

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said:

“Foxhound’s arrival in Afghanistan is great news for our soldiers. This Government has spent £270m on 300 of these hi-tech, British-built vehicles to help keep our troops properly protected. Our servicemen and women deserve the best protection we can get them.”

Chief of the General Staff, General Sir Peter Wall said: “Foxhound gives the British Army the very latest levels of protection on Operations. This has been a well-run programme that will play a key role in equipping the Army of 2020.”

-ends-

Raven22
18-06-12, 09:09 PM
Its the British Army so he's probably a territorial with 2 weeks training before being sent into theatre.

Even so, I'm pretty sure lesson one of British pre-deployment training is don't point your own weapon at your own head.

pdf27
19-06-12, 02:18 AM
Its the British Army so he's probably a territorial with 2 weeks training before being sent into theatre.
OPTAG is 3 months, has been for a long while. Is the barrel actually pointing at him - looks to me like he might well be forward of the line of fire, with the other guy being aft of it. If so, and as they appear to be stationary, not a big problem.

Raven22
19-06-12, 08:21 AM
OPTAG is 3 months, has been for a long while. Is the barrel actually pointing at him - looks to me like he might well be forward of the line of fire, with the other guy being aft of it. If so, and as they appear to be stationary, not a big problem.

No, it's pointing right at his hatch. Even if he it wasn't, if you've lost control of your weapon to the point that the PLATT mount has swung free and pointed the gun back at the vehicle you are doing it wrong. 30 seconds with an 8mm Allen key should help to solve that problem.

buglerbilly
20-06-12, 01:48 PM
Ricardo Receives Sub-Contract for Foxhound Production from General Dynamics

(Source: Ricardo, Inc.; issued June 18, 2012)

It has been announced today that Ricardo UK Ltd has received a sub-contract from General Dynamics that will see the next tranche of 100 Foxhound vehicles for the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) assembled at Ricardo’s special vehicle facility at Shoreham-by-Sea.

The subcontract between Ricardo and General Dynamics Land Systems - Force Protection Europe has been extended to include the final assembly and production of the next batch of 100 Foxhound to be procured by the UK MoD, taking the total number of Foxhound contracted with Ricardo to 300.

The Foxhound is a new “from the ground up” design, for a light tactical (4x4) highly protected mine and blast protected vehicle, integrating V-hull blast protection technology with a modular demountable protected crew pod. The vehicles low weight and tight turning circle enable it to operate effectively in the urban environment where the infrastructure cannot take heavier, larger vehicles. The V-hull runs the length of the vehicle, providing mine and blast protection for the engine and driveline components packaged within its protective envelope. The crew pod rests on the V-hull and is designed to be able to tilt, enabling routine repair and maintenance, or to be removed and replaced quickly by an alternative mission module. This modularity, allows multiple configurations and capabilities.

Production of the first tranche of 200 Foxhounds for the MoD commenced in 2011, and the first production vehicles have now been flown into Afghanistan.

“The announcement of this sub-contract with General Dynamics Land Systems – Force Protection Europe is excellent news for Ricardo and underscores the high quality of our design and engineering skills, and the outstanding nature of our vehicle production capability,” commented Ricardo UK Ltd managing director Martin Fausset.

“Foxhound is the fruit of an extremely successful relationship between Ricardo and Force Protection which continues now with General Dynamics Land Systems. The order for the next 100 Foxhounds is both recognition of the exceptional quality and capabilities of this vehicle, and of the hard work, determination and skills of the team that are manufacturing it at our high quality vehicle assembly facility.”

-ends-

buglerbilly
21-06-12, 12:38 PM
GD UK to deliver British Army's 1st Health and Usage Monitoring System

General Dynamics UK has been awarded a £4 million contract by the Ministry of Defence to deliver the British Army’s first Systems Information Exploitation / Health and Usage Monitoring System (SIE/HUMS). General Dynamics UK will integrate the SIE/HUMS solution into 578 vehicles covering six protected patrol vehicle (PPV) variants in the operational training fleet with the aim of improving the availability and utilisation of those vehicles. The vehicles to be integrated are Mastiff, Ridgeback, Husky, Jackal, Coyote and Wolfhound, all of which General Dynamics UK is familiar with through its Bowman integration activity.

General Dynamics UK won the competition to provide SIE/HUMS based on the cost-effectiveness of its solution, taking advantage of General Dynamics UK’s excellent track record in delivering UOR programmes on time and on budget, along with the pedigree of integrating over 15,000 vehicles from the British Army’s fleet.

General Dynamics UK’s SIE/HUMS solution will provide monitor on-board systems and automatically download data from each vehicle so that operators and fleet managers have accurate information to use in optimizing vehicle use and minimising maintenance. The visibility of vehicleperformance data will enable users to improve fleet availability thereby delivering better Army vehicle fleet-management capability.

The data collected and analysed by the SIE/HUMS will range from engine management-system data such as oil and water temperature, speed, distance travelled, and performance, to information about shocks and vibration, excessive vehicle speed or high fuel consumption. Once such data is collected, statistical time-based analysis can help users identify potential problems. This data also will enable conditioned-based maintenance where lightly used vehicles receive less work, thereby saving the costs of unnecessary maintenance. As more data is collected, prognostics also will enable better preventative maintenance practices, reducing costs and increasing fleet availability.

A key attribute of the General Dynamics UK solution is its ability to be modified through software configuration to record data as required, enabling specific items to be focused upon. In addition, it has been designed to be Generic Vehicle Architecture (GVA) compliant, enabling it to plug-and-play with other GVA-compliant devices to increase onboard capabilities, up to and including the type of complex electronic architecture used on SV. General Dynamics UK has played a central role in the team contributing to the MoD’s future Generic Vehicle Architecture DefStan 23-09 and has patented its electronic architecture solution.

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-43426/GD_UK_to_deliver_British_Army_s_1st_Health_and_Usa ge_Monitoring_System.htm#ixzz1yQWpkIHN

buglerbilly
22-06-12, 12:14 PM
High stakes in the JLTV competition

By Philip Ewing Thursday, June 21st, 2012 12:38 pm



Lockheed Martin would like you to know that just because it’s an aerospace titan that moonlights as a shipbuilder, that doesn’t mean it can’t also build a new fleet of ground vehicles for the Army and Marine Corps.

The company’s media day outside Washington this week provided a reminder of just how huge the world’s largest defense contractor really is — it makes Air Force fighters; Air Force cargo aircraft; Navy littoral combat ships; Navy Aegis equipment; satellites; bombs; missiles; radars — nearly $50 billion worth last year alone.

But it wants more, ever more, and that means breaking into the green services as well as the blue ones. Lockheed is one of six competitors trying to build the Army and Marines’ Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, but unlike most of the others, it’s never been a big vehicle company.

AM General; Oshkosh; BAE Systems; Navistar and General Dynamics — these are ground vehicle companies, and they’re also competing on JLTV. But Lockheed? Even with a division of BAE on its team, this is still the same vendor that its critics say is stuck in quicksand with the F-35 Lightning II — just the kind of program that’s supposed to be its core competency. It’s the same company that got out of shipbuilding, then got back in, and produced what congressional critics and public watchdogs have argued is a lemon of the seas.

You will not be surprised to hear that Scott Greene, Lockheed’s vice president of vehicle systems, sees it differently.

“From a capability and technology standpoint, ground vehicles seem to be a natural evolution from a Lockheed Martin perspective,” he said. “The major reason is this: If you go back 20, 30 years ago, there was a clear demarcation of the good guys one side of the line and the bad guys on the other side of the line. Things have been devolved over the last 20 years or so and I guess the phrase we’re coining now is asymmetric warfare … a vehicle can be in harm’s way at any time. So the vehicle has evolved, from a capability standpoint, and at any point in time could be in harm’s way. This is not just something that’s running bread and milk around. For the most part, in this asymmetric environment, now you’re in a complex environment.”

That, Greene argued, is Lockheed’s forte.

“Now you’re in a complex environment where you have some requirements that, to some, would look somewhat orthogonal: We want you to be very survivable, but we want you to be very lightweight. We want you to be very agile, and we want you to have great gas mileage. We want to have low total ownership cost. Those requirements don’t all line up nicely, so that’s the perfect opportunity for someone like Lockheed Martin, who’s got the whole systems-type thinking, to take a look at this problem and then, from a prioritization standpoint, say, ‘How do we be innovative; how do we get a design that meets these different demanding requirements in an affordable package.’ So from that perspective, it seems to make a natural progression for us.”

It is what it is — company officials weren’t going to say, “Y’know, yeah, we’d better stick to cranking out C-130s and not try to grow our profits with this potential business opportunity.” With most of its income coming from federal contracts, Lockheed wants the broadest possible range of work as a hedge against the coming plateau — or precipice — in the defense budget.

buglerbilly
23-06-12, 01:52 AM
New Foxhound vehicle on display in the UK

An Equipment and Logistics news article

21 Jun 12

The British Army's new Foxhound vehicle has been unveiled for the first time since its arrival in Afghanistan.


The new Foxhound light protected patrol vehicle out on the track at Millbrook
[Picture: Andrew Linnett, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Hundreds of people involved in equipment and support for the UK's Land Forces have flocked to the Defence Vehicle Dynamics (DVD) Exhibition at Millbrook in Bedfordshire, the largest of its kind in Europe.

The Army took advantage of the audience to display Foxhound, the first vehicle to enter service using an 'open systems' approach.

This approach means so-called 'off-the-shelf' upgrades are easier and that there will be greater uniformity with other new technologies and vehicles - future-proofing the Army's core capabilities.

The MOD has committed £270m for 300 Foxhound vehicles with General Dynamics Land Systems - Force Protection Europe, which will sustain around 750 UK jobs.

Foxhound's V-shaped hull helps it withstand explosions and provides unprecedented levels of blast protection for its size and weight. It is light and agile and designed to move freely around the narrow alleyways, tracks, bridges and culverts of Afghanistan.


Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology Peter Luff speaking at the Defence Vehicle Dynamics Exhibition in Millbrook
[Picture: Graeme Main, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

The second tranche of this British-designed-and-built vehicle is part of a £5.5bn investment in the Army’s core armoured vehicle programme over the next ten years. A total of £160bn will be spent on equipment and equipment support over the next decade.

Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology Peter Luff attended the Foxhound unveiling. He said:

"Foxhound is a great example of what can be achieved through the MOD and industry working closely together. I want to maximise the extent to which industry uses an open systems approach both domestically and in the global market, enabling us to buy off-the-shelf as far as possible.

"Now that we have balanced the books, we can with confidence move forward to plan and deliver an armoured vehicle programme worth £5.5bn over the next decade, which will deliver a fleet of state-of-the-art, high-tech and easily deployable fighting vehicles."


The new Foxhound vehicle on display at the Defence Vehicle Dynamics Exhibition in Millbrook
[Picture: Richard Watt, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Major General Carew Wilks, Director Land Equipment in the MOD Defence Equipment and Support organisation, said:

"As well as showcasing current and future land equipment, DVD 2012 has given us a chance to work with our manufacturers and suppliers to see how we can improve our procurement processes by ensuring our equipment systems are easily connected with those of other suppliers. Such an approach allows us to quickly add, change or update sub-systems as needed.

"Foxhound is the first vehicle to enter service taking account of our new generic vehicle architecture standards, so I'm pleased to see it here at DVD giving visitors a tangible idea of how systems integration works."

DVD is one of the most important events in the defence diary for those involved in equipment and support for the UK's Land Forces and is Defence Equipment and Support's annual stakeholder event. It brings together the acquisition community, military personnel and industry organisations for two days of informal discussion and briefings.

buglerbilly
23-06-12, 01:59 AM
More pics from Xav at the show............





Published on Jun 22, 2012 by armyreco

No description available.

buglerbilly
23-06-12, 02:15 AM
The so-called Special Forces/SAS version of the Foxhound...............via Think Defence's excellent FLICKR file................

buglerbilly
23-06-12, 02:23 AM
One from near-term history, LM's AVA2 high mobility armoured truck based on Supacat technology...........sadly only a technology demonstrator...........never seen a side shot so interesting to me..............





Shots taken in 2009..................

buglerbilly
25-06-12, 11:06 AM
Penman's Creation MRV and design roles find their niche



UK – Defence Vehicle Dynamics, Millbrook

Penman’s design house, Creation, flew the group’s flag on the off-road section of DVD 2012 this week, with a display which revealed the latest iterations and design maturity of its Multi-Role Vehicle - Protected (MRV-P) packages. Also making its debut appearance on the Penman stand was Metras, the initial production variant of a new, MRV-derived platform, developed jointly between Penman Group and its Saudi Arabian partner, ERAF Industries, part of Fahad International Company Limited. The vehicle is designed for local manufacture and to fulfil a Saudi Military requirement.

Completing the line up on the Penman Creation stand was a prototype Light Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (LTATV) designed and developed by Jordan’s King Abdullah Design and Development Bureau (KADDB), with support from Creation’s automotive design consultancy. The vehicle, designed initially to fulfil a Jordanian special forces requirement, is to be offered also on the global market and significant interest has been expressed already by a number of agencies around the world.

Both the Penman Creation MRV-P variants on display fully embraced the UK MoD’s theme for DVD 2012 – namely to demonstrate the ambition for full situational awareness, communications system integration and interoperability between fixed and operational platforms, irrespective of the OE manufacturer source of the equipment. Accordingly, both the MRV-P units – and Metras platform are fitted with a range of situational awareness and other equipment from different manufacturers, all designed for full operational functionality.

The 4x4 MRV-P, which took part in recent demonstration trials, was driving on Millbrook’s Battlefield Mission off-road course during the show. The three-axle MRV-P variant on static display was shown in its 6x4 configuration – 6x6 driven/powered third axle versions will follow. The unit also carried a Clark extending telescopic mast and a fire suppression system.

Both two- and three-axle variants of the Creation MRV-P now feature a new, extreme-duty nitrogen-based suspension all round, which improves roll-stiffness and provides further potential for payload growth. The high pressure sealed nitrogen strut unit features an integral damper and internal bump stop offering an intrinsically safe – and retained mobility failure mode. The system, which carries no additional weight penalty, completely replaces the previous airbag-based system, which was considered to be potentially vulnerable to small arms fire and damage in hostile operating conditions.

The latest MRV-Ps also opens up the programme to its full scope and potential. The original platform design concept envisaged a fully functional rolling mine resistant underframe (MRU), onto which a wide variety of protected, softskin or even demountable top cabs, citadels or structures could be integrated. To date, development and production ready units have been configured around typical protected patrol vehicle requirements, whilst concurrent full design and pre-production studies have included a wide range of other applications.

Now, both two- and three-axle variants can be configured for operational roles, body types and specialist applications such as pick-up utility vehicle, light logistics cargo carrier, troop carrier, command and control, demountable shelter, weapons mounted installation kit (WMIK), reconnaissance and battlefield ambulance. Crew and seating layouts can be varied from two to twelve occupants and space is also allocated for weapons fit, communications suites, situational awareness (SA) systems and other electronic devices. Additional features include fully integrated health and usage monitoring systems (HUMS) and the capability to support exportable power requirements.

Throughout, the design has featured a composite ‘occupant survival cell’ with surrounding protection including a V-form belly plate and an integral blast mitigation system. Protection is specified for minimum STANAG 4569 level 2 mine protection and level 2-3 KE protection. Fragment protection is taken to level 4.

With world markets in mind, the mine resistant under-frame (MRU) is also designed to accommodate a range of powertrain options, dependent on end user preference and specification. In addition, the unit has been developed to incorporate a rapid access and removal ‘cassette’ mounting for the cooling pack, engine, automatic transmission and transfer box. This permits main powertrain components to be removed for major repair of maintenance in about an hour.

The vehicle also meets worldwide deployment criteria – A1-C1 operating – and A1-C2 for storage. The unit is also specified for climatic conditions A2-C1 (+56ºC to -32ºC) for storage – and down to C2 extreme at -56ºC for operations. The MRV-P is dimensioned for air transportability within C130 and above – or underslung below CH47. Depending on configuration and protection level, the three-axle variant is designed to meet and exceed improved medium mobility (IMM) criteria with a 4 tonne payload.

The Metras platform on display is configured to carry a crew of eight – commander, driver and six troops. Importantly, virtually all the major chassis and body components have been made in-house at Penman’s Dumfries plant, so that downstream production methodology is well developed prior to integration into ERAF Industries’ operation in Saudi Arabia.

KADDB LTATV



http://www.kaddb.com/public_projects/project.aspx?prodID=15&site_id=1&lang=2

The KADDB 4x4 Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (LTATV) has been designed and developed initially to meet a specific capability requirement of the Jordanian armed forces – although it will be marketed for the global defence market and a number of agencies worldwide have already expressed strong interest. The platform is designed to be customised for use as a tactical vehicle for agile forces requiring fast response and rapid deployment capability. It provides all-terrain transport for two to four special operations soldiers or infantry – and can be used also as a logistics vehicle. The LTATV can be deployed by land, sea or air and is portable within C130 and a range of rotorcraft.

The initial vehicle is powered by a liquid-cooled, diesel engine, delivering selectable 2- or 4-wheel-drive, via a constant velocity transmission (CVT) driveline. The unit has a 60 kph top speed, an approach/departure angle of around 60° and 60% gradeability.

The platform is designed around a rigid tubular steel chassis and includes a two passenger roll cage, tubular steel bumpers and lifting rings. Wheelbase is 2 metres with almost 300mm of ground clearance and a payload of 250 kilograms. Dry weight comes in at just 850 kilos and towing capability of 750 kilos. The unit carries enough fuel for a 250 kilometre range operating at low speed and maximum torque.

Group Managing Director, Bryan Findlay says, “This project is the first fruits of our now established partnership with KADDB and demonstrates Creation’s role as preferred partner and advisory engineering consultants to international OEM’s. We will continue to develop relationships where engineering consultancy and technology transfer offer real opportunity for international cooperation and OEM export market growth.

Source : Penman Engineering Ltd

Published on ASDNews: Jun 22, 2012

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-43458/Penman_s_Creation_MRV_and_design_roles_find_their_ niche.htm#ixzz1ynXODJGs

buglerbilly
25-06-12, 11:11 AM
More on PENMAN............

Penman advances towards world markets with show of strength, mettle and ambition



Penman Group returned to the now bi-annual Defence Vehicle Dynamics show at Millbrook this week to reveal and support a wide ranging portfolio of exhibits across the event which together demonstrated the full scope of its in-house and partner-based capability, product diversity and growing world market success.

Penman, based in Dumfries, Scotland, has fulfilled a very significant string of successful UK and international defence and security programmes including armoured patrol vehicles, protected engineer plant, explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) and specialist vehicles, mine clearing systems and cash-in-transit conversions. The group acquired design house Creation in early 2011 and it also owns Aardvark, which makes the world’s most effective operationally proven landmine clearance machine.

Making its international debut on Penman Group’s own stand at DVD was Metras, the initial production variant of a new, Multi-Role Vehicle (MRV) derived platform, developed jointly between Penman Group and its Saudi Arabian partner, ERAF Industries, part of Fahad International Company Limited. The vehicle is designed for local manufacture and to fulfil a Saudi military requirement. The vehicle shares some major component commonality with the current MRV, whilst modularity and flexibility in the design permit the platform to be configured for a wide variety of future potential applications.

Penman Creation Multi-Role Vehicle – Protected (MRV-P) variants were displayed on the off-road section of the show, alongside a KADDB Light Tactical All Terrain Vehicle (LT-ATV) prototype, a project in which Penman Creation has provided engineering consultancy and technology transfer support.

Also on the Penman stand was a standard Penman Protected™ Toyota Landcruiser, designed for diplomatic, mission, patrol and export market applications. The vehicle is discreetly armoured to provide low aggression, passive protection for the occupants. This is achieved by the inclusion of an internal, armoured steel shell, fully welded into the sides, front, and rear of the passenger compartment. All six doors are also lined in armour and all fit into armoured steel rebates with splash plates, eliminating potential ballistic gaps.

The windows are thick anti-ballistic laminates with integral polycarbonate spall liners. All are fixed into armoured steel rebates, again to eliminate potential ballistic gaps. Floor protection comprises a combined armour steel floor and armoured steel belly pan under the chassis providing protection to fuel and brake lines. The roof armour is fitted discreetly inside the roof liner, joining and overlapping the side armour. In addition to ballistic protection the armoured steel shell provides much improved protection against collision, ram and roll-over incidents. The integrity and strength of construction provides improved resistance to blast attack.

All transparent and opaque faces on the sides, front and rear of the passenger cabin are protected to withstand all ballistic threats up to and including Euro Norm level BSEN1063:BR6 - NS. This level of protection also covers typical shotgun weapons and the AK47 (7.62 × 39 mm ball from point blank range). Optionally, floor protection may be added to protect the passenger cabin against the detonation of up to two L2A2 hand grenades, or equivalent anti-personnel weapons, on the ground.

Established EOD & IEDD platform capability

Showing the company’s established capability for vehicle platform-based total integrated solutions was a fully life-extended bomb disposal unit. Widely referred to by the project name ‘Wedgewood’, the unit was displayed in a dual-role configuration.

Penman Protected™ Plant

Penman has an established and mature capability for the application of crew protection systems (CPS), armour and protection for specialist engineer plant and construction equipment. Three examples of Penman Protected™ plant were shown on at DVD by the Group’s strategic partner, Finning UK, Caterpillar’s main dealer. All three types, a Protected Light-Wheeled Tractor (CAT 434E), a Protected Medium-Wheeled Tractor (CAT 938G) and a Protected Multi-Terrain Loader (CAT 257B) are in service with UK MoD, having been procured as an Urgent Operational Requirement (UOR) by the Service Provision Project Team, General Service Group DE&S, to meet the needs of current operations in Afghanistan. The equipment allows combat engineering tasks and construction tasks to be conducted in high threat locations by providing protection at TES levels.

The Penman crew protection systems (CPS) are designed to provide the operator with full 360° protection, including the roof and floor, from small arms, blast and fragmentation threats. An emergency escape hatch is provided through the roof or side hatch – accessible from both the inside by the operator and outside by rescue personnel. The transparent armour offers excellent operator visibility of the machine and the surrounding work area. Additional options including bar armour, run-flat wheel and tyre systems, communications, electronic countermeasures (ECM) and infra-red lighting are also available.

Penman designs and manufactures armoured crew protection systems (CPS) for a wide range of OEM products, including machines from Caterpillar, JCB, Case and Lannen. Armour Protection is available from entry-level basic riot protection, through to significant STANAG threats for KE, Blast and Fragmentation.

Penman-EKA Lightweight Recovery Vehicle (LRV-P)



The jointly developed Penman-EKA Light Recovery Vehicle – Protected (LRV-P) was displayed by EKA on Stand OR-15/16. EKA, the recognised leader in military recovery vehicle equipment, teamed with Penman to build the vehicle to fill a perceived gap in current provision and inventory, but, since its international debut at last year’s DSEi show in London, it has attracted strong interest in export markets around the world.

The Penman-EKA lightweight recovery vehicle is specifically designed to recover and suspend tow the new generation of protected lightweight vehicles which operate in forward areas of theatre and may require rescue from narrow and confined locations such as village streets – where heavier, full-width recovery vehicles cannot penetrate.

The first LRV-P vehicle to be built is based on a compact, 2.16 metre width, re-roled General Dynamics European Land Systems DURO 3 6x6 logistics chassis armoured by Penman, although the concept package has been designed for application and integration with other suitable vehicle platforms. The unit also incorporates key elements and componentry from the current EKA SuperCompact equipment in service with the UK MoD Support Vehicle (Recovery) fleet, thereby reducing and simplifying any retraining burden, time delay for rapid mobilisation and downstream ILS support.

The EKA recovery equipment is integrated onto a specialist ‘skid’ built by Penman, which closely matches the operational requirements for both recovery and automotive performance. In operation, the new unit is effectively similar to a downscaled version of the larger SuperCompact equipment, but it incorporates a number of innovative features which reduce weight and enhance capacity and mobility of the host chassis. The design has been subjected to extensive finite element analysis (FEA) during the design process to optimise fabrication detail for reliability and durability.

The recovery boom assembly comprises a telescopic rectangular section, the inner box of which carries the recovery bar assembly. The boom provides a maximum lift rating of 6 tonnes and a maximum casualty vehicle weight capability of 15 tonnes. An 8 tonne constant-pull capstan winch is fitted and, in order to anchor the vehicle when winching to the rear, two 8 tonne rated anchor spades are provided to enable two-part pulls to be carried out. Safe stand-off remote operation of the recovery system is controlled from a chest pack with a 10 metre umbilical, connected to a frame mounted control box on the vehicle. The chest pack features progressive paddle joysticks (suitable for gloved operation) for boom in/out, boom up/down and recovery bar levelling.

Apart from the specialist ‘skid’ onto which the recovery system is integrated, Penman has upgraded and modified the vehicle platform to meet anticipated operational requirements. An additional cab seat is provided within the fully armoured tilt cab – as are riot grilles and a cab escape facility. Up-rated heavy duty springs, shock absorbers and off-road tyres have been added to further enhance the vehicle’s all-terrain performance. Other features include full fitment for ECM and EECM, including power provision and cooling.



Source : Penman Engineering Ltd

Published on ASDNews: Jun 22, 2012

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-43459/Penman_advances_towards_world_markets_with_show_of _strength,_mettle_and_ambition.htm#ixzz1ynY6M0re

buglerbilly
28-06-12, 10:49 PM
More MSFV for Afghanistan National Army ordered

28 June 2012 - 13:25 by the Shephard News Team



Textron Marine & Land Systems has announced that it has received a third option award from the US Army Contracting Command for 71 Mobile Strike Force Vehicles (MSFV) for the Afghanistan National Army (ANA). The order has been added to the current contract and has a not-to-exceed value of $79,182,680, according to a 13 June 2012 company statement.

The original order was issued in 2011 for 240 vehicles, three variants of which are being produced: MSFV with enclosed turret; MSFV with objective gunner protection kit; and an MSFV ambulance, with vehicle deliveries scheduled through October 2013. The total number of vehicles ordered to date is now nearing 500.

Derived from the combat-proven M1117 Armored Security Vehicle (ASV), all MSFVs are configured with Enhanced Survivability (ES) capability, which improves blast protection to mine-resistant, ambush-protected (MRAP) levels. The ES-equipped vehicles continue to possess the ASV’s original, all-important V-shaped hull design, in addition to innovative protection design features that enable them to meet MRAP blast protection standards.

The company also announced on 27 June 2012 that it has been issued a contract modification to continue providing training and logistics support in Afghanistan. Under the contract, Textron Marine & Land Systems will support the Afghanistan National Army (ANA) MSFV armoured vehicle programme. This option includes funding for vehicle deprocessing field service representatives, instructors, interpreters and in-theatre management, and other direct costs for an additional one-year period.

buglerbilly
02-07-12, 12:56 PM
Saturday, June 30, 2012

The Multi Role Vehicle (Protected)

The Specialist and Logistic Project Team (SLV PT) is the MOD authority following the Multi Role Vehicle (Protected) requirement, which is, in itself, the name with which the cancelled Operational Utility Vehicle System (OUVS) has been resurrected.
OUVS was a long-running programme (it was launched in 2003) which looked at many different vehicles for finding a replacement for vehicles such as Land Rover and Pinzgauers, RB44s and others. In 2008 the UK and the US formed a joint work group for the UK to enter the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program of the US Army and USMC, but barely a few months later it was decided that the JLTV was not the right direction to go for the British Army, albeit exchange of informations continues.

Heavily EDITED ..........long article long on praise about the Bushmaster..............read and enjoy..........some of the comments are just plain silly and the dick who thinks only 6x6 units are any good as gun limbers for Light Guns is just stupid.........IMHO of course!

http://ukarmedforcescommentary.blogspot.com.au/2012/06/multi-role-vehicle-protected.html#comment-form

buglerbilly
03-07-12, 11:37 AM
Australian Army orders 214 additional Bushmasters

03 July 2012 - 9:33 by the Shephard News Team



Thales Australia has announced that the Australian Government is to purchase an additional 214 Bushmaster vehicles for the Australian Army. Thales made the announcement 3 July 2012 in a company statement.

Over 800 Bushmaster vehicles are on order and in-service with the Australian and Netherlands armed forces. Thales called the Australian government’s decision a ‘tremendous expression of confidence’ in the vehicle.

Thales Australia CEO Chris Jenkins commented, ‘Bushmaster vehicles are proving their worth every day in Afghanistan under some of the harshest conditions imaginable. The vehicle’s life-saving design, off road mobility and reliability have made it a mainstay of Australian operations.’

No information about contract worth or delivery schedules has yet been released.

buglerbilly
03-07-12, 02:18 PM
Nigeria to Unveil Indigenous Armoured Personnel Carrier



08:06 GMT, July 3, 2012 The Nigerian Army will unveil Nigeria’s first locally produced armoured personnel carrier (APC), the Proforce Pf1, during this week’s Army Week celebrations.

Lieutenant General Azubuike Ihejirika, Chief of Army Staff, announced the planned unveiling during a press conference organised for this year’s Army Day celebrations. He was represented by the Chief of Military-Civil Relations, Major General Bitrus Kwaji, who said that the development of the APC is a positive result of ongoing military reform.

He added that producing armoured personnel carriers locally will make the vehicles 30% cheaper than imports.

“The highpoint of the [Army Day celebrations] ceremony [on July 6], which is expected to be witnessed by President [Goodluck] Jonathan, among other dignitaries, include the unveiling of the Nigerian built APC; Combat Airborne Jump and Helicopter Rappelling, Combat March and a Pep talk on old days in the Infantry Corps by Major General Emmanuel Abisoye (Rtd),” Kwaji said.

According to Nigerian media, the new vehicle is the Pf1, built by Nigerian company Proforce Limited. The Pf1is a four wheel drive APC with capacity for ten personnel, including driver and commander, and comes in several variants, including police, APC, combat surveillance, missile carrier, command and control and ambulance.

The vehicle is armed with a pintle mounted 7.62 machinegun and two banks of 3 x 76 mm grenade launchers. Equipment includes a 4 000 kg winch, CCTV system for all-round observation, public address system and searchlights at the front and rear.

Its welded ballistic steel armour complies to STANAG 4569 Level 1 protection (it can withstand 7.62 x 51 ball ammunition at 30 metres) and it is landmine protected to STANAG 4569 Level 2b standard (6 kg anti-tank mine explosion under the centre).

Its 4.8 litre MTU 4R 106 Td21 turbocharged diesel engine, developing 218 hp, gives the 7 850 kg vehicle a top speed of 110 km/h and it is able to navigate obstacles 80 cm high.

Proforce was incorporated in 2008 as a total defence solution provider specialising in armoured vehicles and personal protection and has customers in the Middle East and Africa. Its products include private and commercial passenger armoured vehicles, Armoured Personnel Carriers (APCs), armoured cash-in-transit vehicles, tactical vehicles and ballistic vests and helmets.

Meanwhile, another Nigerian company, Mekahog, is in the process of setting up a factory to manufacture Springbuck and other armoured vehicles in Nigeria. Construction of the new assembly and fabrication plant will commence next year and vehicle production in 2014. The company has just completed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with its joint venture partners in South Africa.

Mekahog is in partnership with Drakensberg Truck Manufacturers (DTM), and has supplied its products to the Nigerian Police Force and Army. At the moment it is fulfilling an order for Springbuck vehicles for the Nigerian government via DTM’s factory in South Africa. Between now and the end of the year the company hopes to receive a firm order for 200 vehicles for Nigeria government and other West African countries.

Mekahog will later build other designs, such as the DTM Fox light armoured commercial pickup and the DCD Mountain Lion armoured battle vehicle.

(Courtesy by defenceWeb; First published at http://goo.gl/Lb9YV)

buglerbilly
03-07-12, 02:53 PM
A lot more on the Bushies and Hawkei.................

More Bushmasters for Army, Hawkei Development Proceeds

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued July 2, 2012)

Minister for Defence Stephen Smith and Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today announced the proposed acquisition of a further 214 Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicles for the Australian Defence Force.

Bushmasters have saved Australian lives in Afghanistan. The vehicle has proven to be very effective, providing Australian troops with mobility and protection, particularly against Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs).

Thales Australia is currently manufacturing Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicles at its factory in Bendigo. This manufacturing capability, and the skills of the workforce, is an important national security capability.

In December 2011, the Government announced that in order to retain critical skills in Bendigo it would explore the purchase of additional Bushmaster vehicles.

In March 2012, the Government announced it would spend more than $15.5 million to manufacture long lead components of the next tranche of Bushmaster vehicles from Thales Australia’s Bendigo factory.

This announcement is in addition to the purchase of 101 Bushmasters to support Australian Defence Force (ADF) operations in Afghanistan announced by the Government in May last year. It underlines the Australian Government’s commitment to the retention of critical skills in Australia’s defence industry.

The new Bushmaster vehicles will progressively replace the oldest Bushmasters in the present fleet and as well provide ongoing protected mobility for the command and control of our artillery.

Production of the additional Bushmaster vehicles will commence in October 2012. Production will be based on successive tranches of 50 vehicles with orders dependent on Thales meeting key milestones to develop Hawkei into a suitable vehicle for Project LAND 121 Phase 4.

This will provide for continued expertise at the Bendigo plant until the start of production of Thales Australia’s Hawkei vehicle under Project LAND 121 Phase 4.

LAND 121 Phase 4 is a $1.5 billion project to provide up to 1300 protected and unprotected light vehicles for Army. Thales Australia’s Hawkei has been selected as the preferred vehicle for the development and testing under Stage 2 of the Manufactured and Supported in Australia (MSA) option under LAND 121 Phase 4.

Following exhaustive testing and assessment of the MSA participants, Defence recommended the Hawkei vehicle as the most likely to meet the future capability and value for money requirements of the LAND 121 Phase 4 MSA option.

The next stage of Phase 4 will include funding for further development and testing including the manufacture of prototype vehicles.

Subject to successful testing of the vehicles, final Government approval of the LAND 121 Phase 4 project is expected in 2015. Production work could potentially commence in Australia as early as 2016.

In addition to ongoing development of the Hawkei, the Government and Defence continue to monitor progress of the United States’ Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) Program, which is another possible option for LAND 121 Phase 4. Australia has previously committed $43 million towards the Technology Development phase of the JLTV program.

The JLTV program is currently progressing towards the Engineering and Manufacturing Development Phase. Contract award and the formal commencement of the Engineering and Manufacturing Development Phase is expected in mid-2012.

While the Government and Defence continue to monitor progress in the JLTV program, no further contribution or commitment has been made by Australia to enter the next phase of the JLTV Program.

-ends-

buglerbilly
19-07-12, 02:03 PM
United Arab Emirates orders 750 M-ATVs

19 July 2012 - 12:49 by the Shephard News Team



BIG win for Oshkosh............

Oshkosh Corporation announced on 19 July that the company has been awarded a contract to provide the United Arab Emirates (UAE) armed forces with 750 MRAP All-Terrain Vehicles (M-ATVs).

The contract awarded to Oshkosh Corporation allows for additional vehicles to be ordered at the discretion of the customer. Oshkosh is scheduled to deliver M-ATVs to the UAE between January and August 2013, pending standard regulatory requirements.

'The Oshkosh M-ATVs will enhance the UAE’s ground operations by providing greater off-road mobility and crew protection to support national security, as well as critical missions related to the security of the Middle East and the broader community of nations,' the company said in a statement.

To date, Oshkosh has received delivery orders for more than 9,500 M-ATVs.

Prior to this M-ATV order, the company also produced the Oshkosh Global Heavy Equipment Transporter (HET) and Oshkosh Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) A4 for international customers.

The Global HET features a powerful 700-horsepower engine and is able to transport a main battle tank, armored vehicles, construction equipment and more, reducing the wear on equipment and crew fatigue that typically occurs over long distances. The Oshkosh HEMTT A4 variants including the Patriot tractor, wrecker, and guided missile transporter are also part of the Patriot Advanced Capability (PAC)-3 missile system.

buglerbilly
19-07-12, 02:14 PM
Meanwhile in Canada, the Truck Programme grinds to a halt...................:dunno

Army trucks project cancelled after DND added $300 million to price tag without permission

By David Pugliese, Postmedia NewsJuly 17, 2012


The Conservative government shutdown a project to buy new army trucks because the Defence Department tried to spend more than $300 million without permission, government, military and industry officials have told the Ottawa Citizen.

The Conservative government shutdown a project to buy new army trucks because the Defence Department tried to spend more than $300 million without permission, government, military and industry officials have told the Ottawa Citizen.

The Defence Department had received government approval in 2009 to move forward with the $430 million purchase of 1,500 off-the-shelf medium-sized trucks. But in subsequent years department and military officials began adding more capabilities to what they wanted in the vehicles, bumping the estimated cost to between $730 million and $800 million.

And in an unprecedented move DND officials continued on with the acquisition without going back to Treasury Board for approval to cover the extra $300 million to $370 million in costs, according to industry, military and government representatives.

When Treasury Board and Conservative government officials discovered what was happening they intervened, shutting down the project last week just minutes before bidding was to close.

The decision to take such action was aimed at avoiding another publicly embarrassing military procurement for the Conservatives.

The government has faced intense criticism in the House of Commons and scrutiny from the parliamentary budget officer and Auditor General over the increasing cost of the F-35 stealth fighter the Conservatives want to buy.

They also faced criticism from the auditor general for their purchase of Chinook helicopters, which will be based at CFB Petawawa. That deal was supposed to cost $2 billion but the price tag ballooned to almost $5 billion according to the auditor general, after military officials started adding more capabilities.

Asked to comment about concerns regarding DND's management of the truck procurement, the department issued the following statement: "Since the MSVS Project was launched in 2006, there have been significant changes in the SMP truck marketplace and fiscal circumstances. The estimates for this project did not reflect this new reality."

The request for proposals from industry has been cancelled and the project is now being re-evaluated "to ensure that it fits these new realities and the authorized expenditure levels," according to the email. "We anticipate doing a focused re-evaluation of the Canadian Army's purchase for trucks and ensuring we move quickly to acquire the right equipment at the best value for taxpayers."

DND officials privately acknowledge the acquisition will only fuel the image some parliamentarians have that the department has gone "rogue." But they say their intention was to go back and request more money from government after the truck bids were in.

They also argue the department had overall approval to buy the trucks since the government announced the purchase in 2006.

NDP defence critic Jack Harris said there seems to be a culture at DND where department officials don't believe they have to follow the same rules set out for other federal organizations.

"It's another example of procurement run amok," said Harris. "It's obviously part of the culture within DND to feel they can do what they want."

Harris said that doesn't bode well for taxpayers since the Conservative government has committed to spending tens of billions of dollars on new military equipment in the future.

He also questioned why Defence Minister Peter MacKay doesn't seem to have control over his department, pointing out the procurement was able to proceed almost to the point where bids were being taken before Treasury Board intervened.

MacKay's office responded with an emailed statement: "Jack Harris and the NDP may not care about how we spend taxpayer dollars, but this government does," the email noted. "We have already delivered 1,300 trucks through the MSVS project, and we continue to make progress on our commitment to give the men and women of the Canadian Forces the tools they need to do their important work."

But Harris said it appears MacKay is not challenging DND bureaucrats on how they spend money or run procurements. "It's his responsibility to provide oversight and that's what's missing here," he added.

In an email, Public Works and Government Services acknowledged that as the deadline for bids on the truck project approached, concerns were raised about funding for the program. "It was determined on the bid closing date that it was not possible to resolve the potential funding issue associated with the quantities of vehicles that were outlined in the requirement," Public Works noted. As a result the decision was made to cancel the bidding process.

Although that was done with minutes to spare, the companies involved had, at DND's request, shipped their trucks to a test range in Nevada as part of the procurement process.

"Canada will be contacting you shortly to arrange for the return of your vehicles," Public Works informed the companies last week. "The Government of Canada would like to thank you for your interest in being a supplier to the Government of Canada. Your participation is appreciated, and we hope that you will continue to bid on procurement opportunity offered by Public Works and Government Services Canada."

There is no indication from the government when the project will be restarted.

But the last-minute move left some defence industry representatives stunned. The preparation of a bid can take months and cost as much as a $1 million.

This is the second time the truck competition, announced with great fanfare in 2006 by the Conservatives, has been derailed.

The trucks, known as standard military pattern vehicles, were supposed to be delivered in 2008. The project was considered a priority because the vehicles they were to replace had become a safety hazard, with faulty brakes and excessive rust.

But the program has run into a number of delays. In December the Ottawa Citizen reported the government decided to go back to square one and re-open the bidding process. At that time government representatives told company officials there had been "further refinements in the technical specification" for the trucks.

In addition, the Ottawa Citizen reported last year the project had been delayed because government officials didn't translate into French the equipment specifications and paperwork to be provided to bidding firms.

In 2008 and 2009, infighting between Army and DND officials over the requirements for the trucks led to a series of delays. At the time, DND issued an email statement: "The project is not in trouble."

The truck program isn't the only military procurement project to run into trouble lately. Several months ago another of the Conservative government's multi-billion dollar military equipment programs went off the rails and had to be restarted.

Companies vying for the $2-billion Close Combat Vehicle (CCV) program were told their bids had been rejected and they would have to submit new proposals. Those are due in September.

It was the second time the candidate vehicles, some of which are in service with allied nations in Afghanistan, were rejected.

© Copyright (c) Postmedia News

buglerbilly
24-07-12, 11:13 PM
U.S. Army Official: JLTV Pick Set for Later in Summer

Jul. 24, 2012 - 04:28PM

By PAUL McLEARY

Despite more than a year of delays in awarding contracts for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle’s Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase, JLTV program leaders insist that up to three 27-month EMD contracts will be awarded “later this summer,” said Col. David Bassett, project manager for U.S. Army Tactical Vehicles.

Originally scheduled for last October, the EMD downselect has been pushed back numerous times, from the summer of 2011 to early winter 2012, to talk that it would come in June, which then turned into July.

Industry sources now say they have been told it should come in late August or early September.

In an emailed statement, Bassett said, “the period given to industry to respond to the solicitation was extended briefly to encourage the broadest possible response.”

The three industry teams that won the original technology development contracts in October 2008 were BAE Systems and Navistar; General Tactical Vehicles (General Dynamics and AM General); and Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems.

All of that changed in February 2011, when the Army and Marine Corps said the EMD contract would be delayed until early 2012 due to major requirements changes to cut costs and reconfigure the vehicle’s armor and weight requirements.

The changes were made following industry complaints of unrealistic requirements, congressional dissatisfaction with the program and the emerging threat posed by proposed Humvee upgrades, which were thought to be less expensive. At the time, some estimates were putting the cost as high as $450,000 per vehicle.

On Jan. 26, the JLTV team finally released a request for proposals for the EMD phase, which called for a 33-month evaluation. The Army and U.S. Marine Corps said they would award up to three $65 million contracts for the delivery of 22 prototype vehicles per contract, with an average unit manufacturing cost target of $250,000, excluding B-kit armor and other add-on kits.

On March 28, the already contentious program, a replacement for the Humvee, was blown open yet again when three new industry teams submitted bids on the last day of the EMD proposal window. Navistar broke away from the BAE team to offer the Saratoga Light Tactical Vehicle, and AM General and Oshkosh both announced they were submitting independent bids.

AM General said it would continue to work with General Dynamics on their joint project while pursuing its own Blast Resistant Vehicle-Off Road. Oshkosh, which had been shut out of the program in 2008, submitted its Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle.

These entries are the reason the EMD downselect date has remained squishy. Bassett said that while his team continues to work through the bids, “this brief extension in the RfP [request for proposal] period, along with the large number of proposal submissions, may cause some delay, however.”

He added that “the JLTV team’s intent continues to remain focused on awarding up to three contracts for the EMD phase later this summer.”

buglerbilly
01-08-12, 12:07 PM
Boeing to Provide Integrated Logistics Support for Thales Australia Vehicle Prototypes

Boeing Defence Australia to support Hawkei for Thales' Land 121 Phase 4 offering to the Australian Army

Aug. 1, 2012 -- Boeing [NYSE: BA] subsidiary Boeing Defence Australia (BDA) will provide Integrated Logistics Support (ILS) during the next stage of development of Thales Australia's Hawkei Protected Mobility Vehicle - Light prototypes. The contract will be delivered under Stage 2 of the Manufactured and Supported in Australia option for the LAND 121 Phase 4 program.

Under the AU$3.5 million contract, BDA will deliver ILS services to the Thales team for six Hawkei prototypes and a trailer that will be delivered to the Australian government for further testing. During the 16-month prototype production and testing phase, BDA will work with Thales Australia to help increase the vehicles' long-term availability and maintainability, with the goal of reducing future support costs. This includes delivering development and training to operators, conducting logistics support analysis and providing logistic engineering support to the Thales design team.

"BDA and Thales Australia are a formidable team, and on this project we bring together the best of both companies -- BDA's leading in-country ILS expertise and Thales Australia's protected-vehicle design expertise," said Kim Gillis, managing director, BDA. "Major Australian Defence Force acquisition programs, such as Wedgetail Airborne Early Warning & Control and Vigilare, have benefited from BDA's ILS services. We continue to provide operational lifecycle support for aircraft including classic Hornets, Super Hornets and the C-17 Globemaster III Integrated Sustainment Program."

"Boeing's ILS capabilities are second to none, and we have benefited significantly from their proficiency and close collaboration in this area," said Chris Jenkins, Thales Australia CEO. "The Hawkei is very much a team effort, and Boeing's involvement since the project's early days has enabled us to deliver innovative prototypes specifically designed to meet the current and future requirements of the Australian Defence Force."

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-44173/Boeing_to_Provide_Integrated_Logistics_Support_for _Thales_Australia_Vehicle_Prototypes.htm#ixzz22I8n HmJd

buglerbilly
07-08-12, 02:19 PM
Camouflage Research Blending In with Future ADF Needs

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued August 6, 2012)

Applies to all vehicles of course.........armoured or not..............

Research that could significantly enhance the Australian Defence Force (ADF) vehicle camouflage scheme has commenced - in unassuming form, on a light board at the back of a Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) laboratory.

The work is focussed on the development of electrochromic materials that change colour with subtle variation in applied voltage. It now forms the basis of a new collaboration with the University of South Australia.

“An outcome is still some years off,” explains DSTO researcher Vivienne Wheaton, “but the ADF has expressed interest in the concept.”

Currently, ADF vehicles are coated with a paint scheme, devised by DSTO, according to a standard specifying colours and near-infrared properties.

“Historically, we have developed camouflage that works very well against specific backgrounds. However, backgrounds change, obviously, by moving from one location to the next – and the ADF can expect to deploy vehicles to a wide variety of operational areas.”

“Even if we stay motionless in the same position, the same scene can look very different at different times of the day, under different weather conditions and throughout different seasons. A camouflage scheme that worked effectively in one instance may be completely ineffective in another,” she says.

Indeed, Australia’s military deployment since the 1960s attests to the variety of environments that the armed forces are expected to operate in: Vietnam, the Gulf, East Timor and the Solomon Islands, each with comparative geographical differences that required specific camouflage to suit respective environments.

Vivienne powers the small concept display in the DSTO laboratory – a voltage supply connected to five board-mounted polymer film panels, known commercially as ‘SPD- Smart’ film.

“The panels are purchased samples of electrochromic material that can be deposited onto glass or other polymer surfaces,” Vivienne says.

Within moments, the densely coloured panels illuminate to a murky green; minimally at first, but enough to visualise the potential of the energy transfer at play – as a chameleon lizard alters it appearance to avoid prey, could a military vehicle’s camouflage change, to enhance its safety?

Applied voltage changes the alignment of small particles in the film, to give a darker or lighter appearance depending on orientation of the particles. The SPD smart film is a high voltage system, but other types of smart materials exist that are low voltage, low power systems more suitable for camouflage applications.

“Applied voltages of less than 5 V will generally initiate colour changes in electrochromic materials, where the change is a result of the chemical species switching between oxidation states.”

“We’re talking about electrochromic pixels that are only effective in the visible band.”

That poses a problem for future implementation of this form of technology.

“It’s important that modern camouflage covers most of the electromagnetic spectrum – from visible light, through infrared and radar wavelengths, because battlefield sensors exploit many different parts of the spectrum.”

In short, a military vehicle suitably camouflaged to one, or few parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, is potentially exposed to other parts – increasing its ‘visibility’ to hostile parties.

“A number of adaptive technologies are under development throughout China, North America and Europe, focusing on different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, but integrating them into a multi-spectral solution is a significant future challenge.”

As this work is at a concept stage, there are still many technical challenges to surmount.

“If this technology were to be developed to create an adaptive camouflage system, ideally the materials would be controlled so as to respond automatically to changes in the environment around them.”

“That would require sensors, integrated with the system, to sense the environment and appropriate signal processing to make enough sense of the environment’s stimuli, and effectively guide the colour transition and pattern generation,” Vivienne says.

“Most current implementations of electrochromics use materials like glass or shiny films that are not well suited to a camouflage application on military vehicles.”

Accordingly, DSTO is progressing a related PhD collaboration with the University of South Australia, to investigate the science behind the panels, with the view to developing the concept into something that can go into the field.

“The collaboration is examining the challenge of developing electrochromics that can be packaged in a more robust, field-ready way.”

“If we can resolve these field issues for electrochromic materials, in the future we may be able to assist the ADF with adaptive improvements to their camouflage systems.”

Vivienne disconnects the modest concept display – the SPD films at once return to charcoal black again.

The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) is part of Australia's Department of Defence. DSTO's role is to ensure the expert, impartial and innovative application of science and technology to the defence of Australia and its national interests.

-ends-

buglerbilly
10-08-12, 02:39 PM
GD UK Delivers 1st Vehicle Health and Usage Monitoring System to British Army in Record Time

(Source: General Dynamics UK; issued Aug. 8, 2012)

Peter Luff, the Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology (MinDEST), has personally taken delivery of the first fully qualified vehicle Systems Information Exploitation / Health and Usage Monitoring System (SIE/HUMS) ‘box’ a mere four months after the contract was signed. Visiting General Dynamics UK’s test and evaluation facility at RAF Pershore near Throckmorton today, the Minister was briefed on how the SIE/HUMS system will monitor on-board systems on the British Army’s operational training fleet of vehicles and automatically download vehicle data, simplifying the job of the Army’s fleet managers.

The SIE/HUMS system will automatically monitor each vehicle returning to base from operations and identify whether it needs any repair or service. The data is uploaded wirelessly to the fleet manager’s system, eliminating the need to check over each vehicle individually. The data can then be used to order the right spare parts for the right vehicles at the right time. The system will lessen the load on the logistics system and lower maintenance costs whilst improving turnaround time across the fleet, ensuring they can be back in operations as quickly as possible.

The SIE/HUMS boxes have been manufactured and tested to stringent MoD standards by General Dynamics UK, working in partnership with a South Wales small and medium enterprise (SME), Analogue and Micro Ltd., to ensure the integration into the 578 vehicles in the operational training fleet can begin as quickly as possible.

Minister for Defence Equipment Support and Technology Peter Luff said, “This technology will help keep more of our vehicles on the road and available for training. These companies show exactly what can be achieved when prime contractors and small and medium-sized companies work closely together to meet a common goal. Being able to provide kit for our troops quickly is vital and I am keen to see more of this kind of success across the defence industry.”

Mark Douglas, vice president at General Dynamics UK, said, “Our ability to deliver the first fully compliant SIE/HUMS box into the Minister’s hands today, only four months after contract signature, is a result of selecting suppliers who are suitably qualified and motivated to work to the timeframes and standards required by military programmes. This work clearly demonstrates what can be achieved when prime contractors like ourselves work with companies from the small and medium enterprise community. We remain a strong advocate of SME businesses as they prove innovative, enthusiastic and most importantly cost-effective.”

The SIE/HUMS system will monitor on-board systems and automatically download data from each vehicle so that operators and fleet managers have accurate information to use in optimizing vehicle use and minimising maintenance. The visibility of vehicle-performance data will enable users to improve fleet availability thereby delivering better Army vehicle fleet-management capability.

The vehicles to be integrated over the next two years are Mastiff, Ridgeback, Husky, Jackal, Coyote and Wolfhound, all of which General Dynamics UK is familiar with through its Bowman integration activity. General Dynamics UK won the competition to provide SIE/HUMS based on the costeffectiveness of its solution, taking advantage of General Dynamics UK’s excellent track record in delivering UOR programmes on time and on budget, along with the pedigree of integrating over 15,000 vehicles from the British Army’s fleet.

-ends-

buglerbilly
20-08-12, 11:18 PM
JLTV Decision Expected Friday

By Michael Hoffman Monday, August 20th, 2012 5:17 pm



Soldiers and Marines will have a better idea who will build their Humvee replacement this Friday when the Army is expected to announce the three companies who will compete to win the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle contract.

Six industry teams are vying to build the JLTV and earn one of the three 27-month Engineering and Manufacturing Development contracts that stipulates each team produce 22 trucks. The Army will pick from those three teams to choose who will build the Army and Marine Corps’ JLTV fleet.

The contract up for grabs is one of the largest available available for bid from the Pentagon. The reduction in planned spending means these contracts mean even more to the defense companies looking to stem losses. The Army plans to buy at least 50,000 vehicles while the Marine Corps plans to buy 5,000.

Both service want to keep the price tag no higher than $250,000 per vehicle. The JLTV program appeared doomed to be replaced by the Humvee Recap program until Army and Marine Corps officials sat down at the bargaining table and agreed to cut certain requirements to get down to the $250,000 figure.

The JLTV has faced a string of delays in the past to include the awarding of the EMD contract, but sources inside the Pentagon appear confident the announcement will be made Friday.

In what was expected to be a three horse race for the EMD contract, the playing field grew to six in the weeks leading up to the deadline to submit proposals for the contract.

The three teams that entered the technology development phase of the competition included General Tactical Vehicles (General Dynamics and AM General), BAE Systems and Lockheed Martin, and Navistar and BAE Systems. Weeks before the deadline, though, teams started splitting off to offer separate bids causing a chain reaction.

Navistar split from BAE Systems to offer their Saratoga vehicle. AM General then announced they’d offer an independent bid even though they promised to continue to work together with General Dynamics on their General Tactical Vehicles bid. BAE Systems announced that the Ford Company would build the engine for their newly independent bid once Navistar bolted.

Meanwhile, Oshkosh announced months earlier that they would enter the competition. And through it all, Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems, never broke up their team.

It’s possible that AM General and BAE Systems could have multiple bids selected for the EMD contract or none at all.

buglerbilly
21-08-12, 11:32 AM
Armoured SISU 8x8 fire truck introduced

20 August 2012 - 16:08 by the Shephard News Team



mentioned previously, here's the pic plus more data..........

SISU Defence has introduced a new armoured SISU 8x8 fire fighting vehicle for fire extinguishing and rescue operations. The design for the new extinguishing concept started five years ago, and the thirty-ton vehicle is now undergoing field tests, which are scheduled to be succeeded by serial production from 2013 onwards.

According to SISU, the vehicle carries a 10-ton extinguisher container, which can be quickly decoupled from its eight-wheel carrier. Further to the comprehensive decoupling feature, the essential properties of the new fire-fighting vehicle include remote control system for the extinguisher, and high protection level for the crew.

A video camera, and a thermal camera located on cabin roof of the vehicle transmit an image to the control panel screen inside the cabin, so the water cannon can be remotely controlled from within the cabin.

SISU said that the cabin of the SISU 8x8 fire-fighting truck is NBC protected, providing protection against the potentially dangerous aerosols on the field during the operations. The SISU 8x8 military truck has also advanced mine- and ballistic protection features. The mine- and ballistic protection of the vehicle meets with the criteria of STANAG 4569 standard, and the related properties have been tested and proven in live tests in co-operation with the Finnish Defence Forces.

buglerbilly
22-08-12, 02:02 PM
JLTV Key To "Offensive Spirit" Post-Afghanistan: Former VCSA Chiarelli - EXCLUSIVE

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

Published: August 22, 2012



After years of ups and downs and threats of cancellation, the Army and Marines are about to award contracts to develop a new Joint Light Tactical Vehicle to replace the venerable and vulnerable Humvee. In an exclusive interview with AOL Defense, retired Vice Chief of Army Staff Gen. Peter Chiarelli -- the man who did more than anyone to save the JLTV from cancellation -- argued that the new armored truck is critical not just to protect US troops but to carry the fight to the enemy in future wars.

"When I was vice [chief of staff], we were about ready to lose JLTV because of the cost; the Marine corps and the Army were heading in two different directions; and it was really [Marine Corps Assistant Commandant] Joe Dunford and I who said wait a second, we really need this vehicle, we can't afford this service parochialism," Chiarelli recalled.

What made JLTV such a priority for the two services, which together plan to buy 55,000 at a price Chiarelli and Dunford bargained down to a still-hefty $250,000 apiece?

"You need some kind of replacement for the Humvee because you cannot put the IED genie back in the bottle," Gen. Chiarelli told AOL Defense. Roadside bombs and other "improvised explosive devices" that attack from underneath -- where even uparmored Humvees remain painfully vulnerable -- are too easy and effective a weapon to imagine that future enemies will not employ them in whatever conflicts come after US troops eventually leave Afghanistan. "It's going to be part of just about any kind of fight that we're in," he said.

So, Chiarelli went on, "we needed a vehicle that provided a greater amount of protection - understanding that you can't protect against everything. It's not only that you want to save lives and arms and legs. You want to keep up the offensive spirit of the force: The force has to believe it can traverse the battlefield and survive."

If the problem were simply about protection -- defense -- and not mobility -- offense -- then the military arguably already has a solution: The services have invested billions in Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected (MRAP) vehicles to replace Humvees in Iraq and Afghanistan. But officers like Chiarelli have always seen the MRAP as a stopgap because most variants are relatively road-bound, lacking the cross-country mobility that was the hallmark of the original Humvee.

"They're not the replacement for the Humvee. That doesn't mean that may not have a role in the future," Chiarelli said. The Army, for example, will likely retain many MRAPs for "route clearance" units that hunt roadside bombs, where off-road performance is not an issue. But as a general-purpose transport for a wide range of missions around the world, the military wants to get back the versatility and mobility of the Humvee and its predecessor, the famous Jeep -- without the losing MRAP-level protection that's now essential against roadside bombs.

"I don't think the battlefield is becoming any less lethal, it's becoming more lethal," Chiarelli said. By issuing first uparmored Humvees and then MRAPs to infantry in Iraq and Afghanistan, he said, "we've taken light forces and we've made them heavy forces. They couldn't fight as light forces. They would lose their offensive spirit as light forces because they needed protection to traverse the battlefield" without being blown apart.

"The nature of war has changed," Chiarelli summed up. "I get into all kinds of arguments when I say that, [but] I honestly believe it's changed."

"When I took the 1st Cavalry Division over to Iraq in 2004-2005," he explained, "I had eight uparmored Humvees and they were all with my MP [military police] company, used for 'rear area protection.'" It was the division's heavily armored M1 Abrams tanks and M2 Bradley troop carriers that were supposed to bear the brunt of the fighting, Chiarelli said. But the troops discovered, painfully, that there was no longer a clear "front line" or a relatively safe rear area, only a vast amorphous danger zone in which support troops proved terribly vulnerable in their Humvees. That danger is what drove the uparmored-Humvee program, then the MRAPs, and now JLTV.

Chiarelli does not think that this was a problem unique to Iraq, Afghanistan, or even counterinsurgency in general, but a fundamental feature of 21st century war: In the future, "I just don't see linear fights occurring," he said. "There's too much that's happened in the area of information technology, [such as] the ability to pass information through simple systems such as cellphones." If low-tech foes like al-Qaeda and the Taliban can use such off-the-shelf technology to threaten US forces in their rear areas today, higher-tech "hybrid" adversaries such as Hezbollah can certainly do so in the future.

The US military has made its own impressive adaptations to the information revolution, Chiarelli emphasized. "The real key here is collaboration," he said. "In these very non-linear wars, many of the key decisions that are made on the battlefield are not made by generals in command centers, they're made by individuals soldiers down on the ground." New network technologies -- the Army's top modernization priority -- "allow us to quickly collaborate over the battlefield": Systems that the Army only had a dozen per division back in 2004 are now issued to individual platoons.

All these capabilities, of course, cost money, from the new networks to better-armored vehicles. So do the people to operate them and the training for those people to get good at it. Army leaders are now struggling to balance steep cuts across acquisitions programs, operations and maintenance accounts, and personnel. "What successive chiefs from Casey to Dempsey to Odierno [have said] was we're going to turn those dials down at the same time," said Chiarelli. Unlike in past drawdowns, he emphasized, "we're not going to rob the people accounts and the modernization accounts."

At least, that's the plan. Chiarelli is hardly sanguine about the Army's ability to keep that balance as the budget declines, especially if sequestration hits. "When we get out of Afghanistan, it'll be the way it's always been," he feared: "We'll tend to forget those real lessons-learned that we had and go to something that's easier, cheaper, lighter. Deployability will become bigger than survivability." In such an environment, programs like the JLTV will be a much harder sell -- but Chiarelli, and his former colleagues still in the Army and Marine Corps, are going to keep trying to make the case.

buglerbilly
23-08-12, 10:39 AM
AM General's BRV-O proceeds to next phase of JLTV

23 August 2012 - 9:08 by the Shephard News Team



AM General has announced that its independent proposal for the US military's new Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV), has been selected for an Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase contract. The EMD contract, valued at $64.5 million, was announced 22 August 2012.

Under the contract, AM General will produce and deliver 22 prototypes of its Blast Resistant Vehicle - Off road (BRV-O) for government testing.

According to AM General, the BRV-O is based on more than a decade of the company’s investments in research, development and testing for this next-generation light tactical military vehicle. Its mobility technology has been matured to meet current requirements, and it has accumulated more than 300,000 operational test miles and ‘demonstrated high reliability and maintainability’.

The vehicle features a crew capsule and modular armour already proven effective in government-supervised blast testing. The vehicle has been designed to be readily adaptable to future changes in US military missions, enemy threats and new protection technologies as they emerge.

It also features AM General's lightweight, fuel efficient and high performance engine and transmission powertrain; a self-levelling suspension system; a C4ISR backbone with open-standard networked architecture and clustered super-computing power.

buglerbilly
23-08-12, 10:57 AM
U.S. Army and Marine Corps Make JLTV Selections

Aug. 22, 2012 - 09:27PM

By PAUL MCLEARY

The U.S. Army and Marine Corps have selected three vehicles for the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program, with the announcement coming Wednesday evening.

The awards were somewhat surprising, since two of the three went to companies that submitted their designs in March, as opposed to bidders who had been working on the program since its inception in 2005.

The awards went to AM General, ($64.5 million); Lockheed Martin ($66.3 million); and Oshkosh Corporation, ($56.4 million). AM General and Oshkosh are the new bidders.

In a notice posted to a government contracting website, the Army said that the firm-fixed price contracts cover the 27-month EMD effort, and that “approximately $99.5Mwas obligated for the three contractors by this action, with initial funding of approximately $28M to $36M for each contractor. The balance of the funding, up to full base contract amount, will be provided in FY 13 and FY 14.”

The Army says that it plans to purchase 50,000 vehicles, while the Marine Corps is looking to buy 5,000.

The three industry teams who won technology development contracts in October 2008 included BAE Systems and Navistar; General Tactical Vehicles (General Dynamics and AM General); and Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems.

But on March 28, Navistar left the BAE-led team to offer the Saratoga Light Tactical Vehicle, and AM General and Oshkosh both announced they were also striking out on their own to submit independent bids.

The announcement today — barring a protest — shuts out original TD winners BAE Systems and General Dynamics, as well as newcomer Navistar.

John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Marine Corps programs at Oshkosh, told Defense News that the company had upgraded its TAK 4 suspension system found on its 8,800 M-ATV platforms serving in Afghanistan for its JLTV offering, and that the vehicle “leverages directly the lessons learned from the M-ATV” in combat to provide crew protection. He added that the company’s JLTV design can reach off-road speeds up to 70 percent higher than the M-ATV.

In a statement, AM General president and CEO Charles M. Hall said that “as the most experienced tactical wheeled vehicle provider in the United States, AM General is uniquely focused on meeting the needs of the U.S. armed forces and our team is prepared to move forward.” The company’s mobility technology has “accumulated more than 300,000 operational test miles and demonstrated high reliability and maintainability,” the statement said.

On the other side of the ledger, BAE Systems emailed a statement saying that the company “look[s] forward to a full debriefing from the government as we evaluate our next steps.”

Archie Massicotte, president of Navistar Defense also said in a statement that “we still feel strongly about the capabilities of our Saratoga JLTV vehicle, which is designed to be delivered to market quickly with less investment than traditional defense programs, and we believe it is appealing to nations facing uncertain futures and limited budgets.” He added that “down the road, there may be an opportunity for Navistar to bid for a JLTV production contract after the EMD phase is complete. We will seriously consider that option.”

buglerbilly
23-08-12, 10:26 PM
AM General, Lockheed, Oshkosh To Work On Humvee Replacement

By Reuters

August 23, 2012



The U.S. Army and Marine Corps on Wednesday awarded Humvee maker AM General as well as Lockheed Martin and Oshkosh contracts valued at $56 million to $66 million to work on prototypes for a new truck to replace the workhorse Humvee.

The multibillion-dollar Humvee-replacement program is one of few new development programs available to U.S. companies as the Pentagon prepares for up to $1 trillion in cuts to planned spending over the next decade.

Lockheed, privately held AM General and Oshkosh beat out Navistar International, General Dynamics, and Britain’s BAE Systems, who had also bid for the 27-month Joint Light Tactical Vehicle development contracts.

The decision by the two military services, posted late Wednesday on a government contracting site, foresees initial funding of $99.5 million on the program, with the remaining funds to be spent in fiscal years 2013 and 2014. The Army issued a request for proposals on Jan. 26 for the program.

AM General, which had previously been teamed with General Dynamics, and Oshkosh had entered the competition only in March, along with Navistar, which was initially part of a team with BAE Systems.

AM General’s overall contract was valued at $64.5 million; Lockheed’s was valued at $66.3 million and Oshkosh -- which also built a mine-resistant, all-terrain vehicle for the military’s use in Afghanistan, was valued at $56.4 million.

Current plans call for the Army to buy up to 50,000 of the new vehicles, with the Marines set to buy 5,000 more.

AM General welcomed the announcement, saying it would produce 22 prototypes of its “Blast Resistant Vehicle - Off road” or BRV-O, which it said was based on over a decade of the company’s investment in research, development and testing.

Navistar said it was disappointed by the news, but said there could be an opportunity to compete for a production contract once the engineering and manufacturing development phase was completed. A spokeswoman said she was not aware of any plans by the company to protest the government’s decision.

No immediate comment was available from the other companies.

The Army’s announcement on Wednesday said the losing bidders could proceed to develop vehicles at their own cost and risk, but needed to let the government know of any such plans within 30 days.

buglerbilly
23-08-12, 10:43 PM
Army's Foxhound fleet to grow

An Equipment and Logistics news article

23 Aug 12

The Ministry of Defence has announced plans to procure 25 extra Foxhound vehicles to add to the Army's existing fleet.


A Foxhound light protected patrol vehicle at Millbrook Proving Ground in Bedford (library image)
[Picture: Andrew Linnett, Crown Copyright/MOD 2011]

The MOD made an initial order for 200 Foxhound vehicles in November 2010 and a further 100 were requested late last year as part of a £400m package. The latest 25 will be in addition to this at a cost of £30m.

Foxhound, the Army's state-of-the-art light protected patrol vehicle, arrived in Helmand province in June of this year.

The Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology, Peter Luff, made the procurement announcement today at an event at the Army's Bulford Camp showcasing the capabilities of Service personnel from 4th Mechanized Brigade who are preparing to deploy on Operation HERRICK 17.

Mr Luff said:

"I was very pleased to be able to confirm the purchase of 25 additional new Foxhound vehicles.

"Foxhound's cutting-edge technology gives our troops the ability to engage with Afghan civilians, as they must, whilst benefiting from a high level of protection. Personnel from 4th Mechanized Brigade will be amongst the first to use this outstanding new vehicle.

"This is another example of how the MOD, having balanced the budget, is now able to confidently spend money on the equipment that our personnel really need."

Personnel from 4th Mechanized Brigade will be amongst the first to make use of the new Foxhound vehicle on operations. For its size and weight, Foxhound provides unprecedented levels of blast protection against the threats faced by troops on the front line.


A Foxhound light protected patrol vehicle in Afghanistan (library image)
[Picture: Sergeant Andy Reddy, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Robust enough to withstand the blast from an IED, it has a top speed of 70mph (113km/h). The engine can also be removed and replaced in just 30 minutes and it can drive away from an ambush on only three wheels.

4th Mechanized Brigade will deploy to Afghanistan in October for a six-month tour as the lead formation of Task Force Helmand. Due to the significant progress in the development of the Afghan National Security Forces it will be the first brigade to oversee a drawdown of British troops from Helmand province, with the UK's military commitment there due to be cut by 500 by the end of the year.

The showcase at Bulford has enabled members of the Task Force to show off their skills, from marksmanship and search dog handling, through to the challenges of having to cook for thousands of soldiers, sailors and airmen and women on a daily basis.

Brigadier Bob Bruce, Commander of 4th Mechanized Brigade, said:

"Today has enabled many of the men and women who will deploy on HERRICK 17 to showcase not only the high quality equipment with which they will deploy but also the result of the extensive pre-deployment training that they have conducted.

"4th Mechanized Brigade previously deployed to Afghanistan in 2010, but a lot has changed since then. Now we are well down the path of transition - the handover of security responsibilities to our Afghan colleagues - and our strategic outlook is very different to what it was two years ago.

"Notably, we will be the first Task Force to see our numbers reduce during the course of our tour, a big challenge but one we will embrace.


Foxhound vehicles being transported inside an RAF C-17 aircraft (library image)
[Picture: Sergeant Andy Reddy, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

"We are an experienced and well-balanced Task Force; while based on a regular Army formation we also have a number of regular Royal Navy and RAF Service personnel in our ranks, as well as a number of reservists who have readily volunteered their time to accompany us to the front line."

The tour will see 'The Black Rats', as 4th Mechanized Brigade is also known, working in support of the Afghan National Army's 3/215 Brigade and the Afghan National Police in their mission to bring security and stability to a region that has known years of unrest but has seen steady progress thanks to the efforts of Afghan, British and other international forces.

Approximately 10 per cent of the personnel who deploy on Op HERRICK 17 will be reservists, including elements of 6th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, 103 Battalion Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, 243 (Wessex) Field Hospital and 101st (Northumbrian) Regiment Royal Artillery.

Mr Luff added:

"I was delighted to have the opportunity to meet some of the members of 4th Mechanized Brigade who will deploy to Afghanistan in the autumn and will face an entirely new challenge.

"They continue the work of their predecessor brigades and also oversee the beginning of our drawdown as Afghanistan looks ahead to a future with its own Armed Forces taking the security lead."

4th Mechanized Brigade will replace 12th Mechanized Brigade when they deploy on Op HERRICK 17 in October 2012.

buglerbilly
24-08-12, 11:58 AM
LM Wins $65 M JLTV Engineering and Manufacturing Development Phase



Lockheed Martin [NYSE:LMT] received a $65 million contract from the U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps to continue developing the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) through the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase.

The Lockheed Martin team optimized a JLTV model already proven in government testing to create its EMD design. The production-enhanced JLTV maintains the proven force protection, mobility, transportability and reliability of the earlier Technology Demonstration (TD) model, while significantly reducing weight and cost. The team’s JLTV design reflects improvements from more than 160,000 combined testing miles.

"We are extremely pleased to announce the selection of the Lockheed Martin JLTV design as one of three mature vehicles selected to enter the Engineering and Manufacturing Development Phase of the JLTV Program,” said Col. David Bassett, project manager at the JLTV Joint Program Office. “We are confident that the Lockheed Martin team, along with the other two selected vehicles, are ready to demonstrate their ability to meet and exceed our requirements, deliver vehicles on schedule, and achieve the manufacturing and sustainment costs necessary to compete effectively for production."

Formed in 2005, the Lockheed Martin-led JLTV team includes tactical wheeled vehicles expertise at BAE Systems in Sealy, Texas, which is an industry leader in advanced armor solutions and high volume assembly. The team also includes numerous Tier 1 suppliers, including: Allison Transmission, Cummins Engine, L3 Combat Propulsion Systems, Meritor Defense, Robert Bosch LLC and Vehma International of America.

“We’ve had a consistent team since day one, and this win highlights the merits of a stable, proven design,” said Scott Greene, vice president of ground vehicles at Lockheed Martin’s Missiles and Fire Control business. “Two JLTVs have been produced on an active manufacturing line, so we are already well prepared for rapid production and testing.”

The firm fixed-price contract has a 27-month performance period with deliveries of 22 vehicles taking place within 12 to 14 months. Primary variants with companion trailers include the utility carrier and shelter (JLTV-UTL), a two-seat prime mover with an open bed; and the general-purpose vehicle (JLTV-GP), which is a four-seater that will carry troops, ammunition and small supplies.

Lockheed Martin’s JLTV EMD vehicles are more affordable than their predecessors, offering lower-cost materials with high fuel efficiency and low logistical support costs. The vehicles offer enhanced crew safety based upon government tests that show the design meets the high blast-protection standards, with margin, of many existing mine-resistant vehicles serving in combat today. Additionally, the Lockheed Martin team shaved hundreds of pounds off the TD design, which was already proven in helicopter lift tests.

Source : Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE: LMT)

Published on ASDNews: Aug 24, 2012

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-44577/LM_Wins_$65_M_JLTV_Engineering_and_Manufacturing_D evelopment_Phase.htm#ixzz24SaU2pfg

buglerbilly
25-08-12, 02:18 AM
JLTV Program Enters the Final Round

Tamir Eshel August 24, 2012 14:51


One of several JLTV prototype built by the industry team lead by Lockheed Martin. Photo: Lockheed martin

The Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program entered a new phase yesterday, with the award of $187 million in three contracts for the 27 months Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase of the program. Two independent contractors, Oshkosh Defense ($56 million) and AM general ($64 million) along with an industry team lead by Lockheed martin ($66 million) were selected to proceed to the EMD phase. Each of the winning companies will deliver 22 prototype vehicles within 12-14 months, to be used for testing by the services. Primary variants with companion trailers include the utility carrier and shelter (JLTV-UTL), a two-seat prime mover with an open bed; and the general-purpose vehicle (JLTV-GP), which is a four-seater that will carry troops, ammunition and small supplies. Following the EMD phase the government will select a single contractor to produce at least 50,000 JLTV vehicles for the Army and 5,500 for the Marine Corps, at an estimated cost of more than US$6 billion. The JLTV program is closely followed by Australia, the U.K., Israel and Canada, although except of Australia, no foreign country has committed funding to the program.

Two of the three teams participating in the Technology demonstration phase did not make it – the General Dynamics – AM General (GTV team) failed to get its Eagle selected, so did the BAE – Northrop Grumman team, offering the Valanx, the vehicle originally developed in cooperation with Navistar Defense.

What brought the teams to collapse before the EMD phase was the realization that the vehicle cost, weight and performance could not meet the new requirements. In January 2012 the Army stated cost targets of $230,000 – $270,000 for the vehicles, almost half the cost of the original vehicle and about the same cost that would involve upgrading the current HMMWVs. This ‘diet’ presented an advantage for traditional producers of tactical vehicles like Oshkosh, AM General and Navistar, that provide ‘vertically integrated’ supply chain under one roof, thus being more flexible in the allocation of manufacturing resources and cost margin of main subsystems (engine, suspension etc).

While the strategy of a single bidder worked for Oshkosh and AM General, it did not help Navistar get a piece of the action. Its strategic move leaving the team with BAE did not help either. While BAE is still part of the Lockheed Martin team, Navistar that went its own way to offer its newly developed ‘Saratoga’ design, lost on all fronts.


The BRV-O vehicle proposed by AM General. Photo: AM General

AM-General played the same strategy, and won. Both AM General and Oshkosh won with independent designs, developed outside of the government funded (technology development) track at the company’s private funding.

Wining one of the three EMD contracts is a major win for AM General, which fought hard to keep its share of the Pentagon’s vehicle procurement budget in the post HMMWV era. Sofar AM General was a single product company, based entirely on the HMMWV line produced primarily for the US Government. Throughout the evolution of the program AM General maintained its alliance with General Dynamics Land Systems, developing the Eagle technology demonstrator. At the last moment, on March 28 this year, the company sidestepped submitting an independent bid with its own BRV-O, while maintaining the team with GDLS. “As the most experienced tactical wheeled vehicle in the United States, AM general is uniquely focused on meeting the needs of the U.S. armed forces” Charles M. Hall, president and CEO of AM General said, “our team is prepared to move forward – shoulder-to-shoulder with our customer – on this critical national initiative.” AM general’s Blast-Resistant Vehicle – Off Road (BRV-O) prototype uses a crew capsule and modular armor already proven effective in government-supervised blast testing. It also features a lightweight, fuel efficient, high performance engine; a self-leveling suspension system; a C4ISR backbone with open-standard networked architecture and clustered super-computing power, and other advanced components. Its mobility technology, matured to meet Warfighter demands, accumulated more than 300,000 operational test miles and demonstrated high reliability and maintainability.


The Light All terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) proposed by Oshkosh Defense was one of three designs to win the latest EMD phase. Photo: Oshkosh Defense.

Oshkosh also demonstrated an impressive rebound into the JLTV program. Since 2006 Oshkosh has invested significant amounts in developing platforms and technologies to meet JLTV requirements. Originally teamed with Northrop Grumman and Plasan, Oshkosh lost the first (TD) phase back in 2008, but kept on improving the developmental Light Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) on its own funding. “As a result, the Oshkosh JLTV delivers the latest automotive technologies, including the TAK-4i independent suspension system, along with advanced crew protection system, while meeting the JLTV performance at an affordable price” John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Joint and Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense said. He added that the intelligent independent-suspension system to provide significantly faster speeds when operating off-road, which can be critical to troops’ safety. Based on its modular armor design, the vehicle can accept multiple armor configurations, which allows the vehicle to adapt easily to changing operational requirements.

Market analysts consider the main competition will be between AM General and Oshkosh, but Lockheed Martin, the Pentagon’s largest contractor, isn’t ready to give up. The team established by the company in 2005 was the only team to survive through all the program phases and now they are playing to win. “We’ve had a consistent team since day one, and this win highlights the merits of a stable, proven design,” said Scott Greene, vice president of ground vehicles at Lockheed Martin’s Missiles and Fire Control business. ” The team includes BAE Systems tactical wheeled vehicles operations in Sealy, Texas, Other members include Allison Transmission, Cummins Engine, L3 Combat Propulsion Systems, Meritor Defense, Robert Bosch LLC and Vehma International of America. According to Scott, these production-ready JLTV EMD vehicles are more affordable than their predecessors, built with lower-cost materials, offering higher fuel efficiency and lower logistical support costs.


As part of the air-mobility testing these JLTV variants built by Lockheed martin were sling loaded under a US Army CH-47D Chinook (left) and US Marine Corps CH-53E. Photos: Lockheed martin

“Two JLTVs have been produced on an active manufacturing line, so we are already well prepared for rapid production and testing” Scott added. The team’s JLTVs offer enhanced crew safety based upon government tests that show the design meets the high blast-protection standards, with margin, of many existing mine-resistant vehicles serving in combat today. This diet has reflected in significant weight loss, “The Lockheed Martin team shaved hundreds of pounds off the TD design, which was already proven in helicopter lift tests.” Greene added.


Utility vehicle developed by Lockheed Martin for the JLTV program shown here towing a trailer on one of the tests. Photo: Lockheed Martin.

buglerbilly
27-08-12, 10:33 PM
Oshkosh to Develop JLTV – The Future of Light Tactical Vehicles

The U.S. Department of Defense has awarded Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation (OSK), a contract for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program’s Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase. The JLTV program aims to replace many of the U.S. military’s aged HMMWVs with a lightweight vehicle that offers greater protection, mobility and transportability.

“The JLTV program is critical to supporting our troops who stand in harm’s way and deserve the best equipment that industry can provide,” said John Urias, Oshkosh Corporation executive vice president and president, Oshkosh Defense. “The Oshkosh JLTV solution will allow the Army and Marine Corps to provide unprecedented levels of protection and off-road mobility in a light vehicle – so that their troops can accomplish their missions and return home safely.”

JLTV is managed by the Joint U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps program, under the leadership of the U.S. Army’s Program Executive Office for Combat Support and Combat Service Support (PEO CS&CSS). Under the contract, Oshkosh will deliver 22 Oshkosh-designed and manufactured JLTV prototypes within 365 days of contract award, and support government testing and evaluation of the prototypes.

Since 2006, Oshkosh has invested significantly in independent R&D to develop its JLTV solution. Oshkosh employed a generational product development approach that aligned to rapidly evolving technical requirements. As a result, the Oshkosh JLTV delivers the latest automotive technologies, an advanced crew protection system, and a next generation TAK-4i™ independent suspension system to achieve JLTV performance at an affordable price. The Oshkosh JLTV is fully tested, ready for initial production, and meets or exceeds the requirements of the JLTV program.

“The Oshkosh JLTV solution was designed with a purpose – to keep Warfighters safe on future battlefields with unpredictable terrain, tactics, and threats,” said John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Joint and Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “Oshkosh has a 90-year history of delivering high quality military vehicle programs on-time and on-budget, and our JLTV program is no exception. We understand how critical this light, protected, off-road vehicle will be to Warfighters.”

The Oshkosh JLTV solution, called the Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle, or L-ATV, offers an advanced crew protection system that has been extensively tested and is proven to optimize crew survivability. The L-ATV can accept multiple armor configurations, which allows the vehicle to adapt easily to changing operational requirements. The L-ATV also applies the Oshkosh TAK-4i™ intelligent independent-suspension system to provide significantly faster speeds when operating off-road, which can be critical to troops’ safety.

Oshkosh Defense has an unwavering commitment to the men and women who serve our nation. Notably, Oshkosh was awarded the M-ATV contract in June 2009 on an urgent needs basis. Oshkosh ramped up production at a historical pace – delivering 1,000 vehicles per month within six months. Oshkosh delivered more than 8,700 M-ATVs, most of which were deployed in Afghanistan and are credited for saving thousands of troops’ lives.

“Oshkosh’s M-ATV is the only vehicle in the combat theater in Afghanistan performing the JLTV’s mission profile,” said Bryant. “We delivered more than 8,700 M-ATV’s on-time and on-budget, and Oshkosh will bring the same level of commitment to the JLTV program.”

Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, is an industry-leading global designer and manufacturer of tactical and protected military vehicles, delivering a full product line of conventional and hybrid vehicles, advanced armor options, proprietary suspensions and vehicles with payloads that can exceed 70 tons. Oshkosh Defense provides a global service and supply network including full life-cycle support and remanufacturing, and its vehicles are recognized the world over for superior performance, reliability and protection.

Read more: http://www.defencetalk.com/oshkosh-to-develop-jltv-the-future-of-light-tactical-vehicles-44329/#ixzz24mhmJDuh

buglerbilly
27-08-12, 10:45 PM
JLTV Strategies Compared: Lockheed vs. Oshkosh vs. AM General

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

Published: August 27, 2012

Three very different teams are contending to build the Humvee's replacement, the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle. AOL Defense weighs their strengths and weaknesses.

Last week, the Army and Marines slashed a crowded field of competitors in half, awarding contracts for "engineering and manufacturing development" of JLTV prototypes to aerospace giant Lockheed Martin, truck maker Oshkosh, and Humvee manufacturer AM General. The choices surprised many observers because only one of the three, Lockheed, had won in the previous round, in 2008, when the military awarded three "technology development" contracts. A major restructuring of the program last year had rendered many of the original criteria irrelevant, because -- facing a cancellation threat from the Senate Appropriations Committee -- the Army and Marines had trimmed back their ambitions for the new vehicle to contain spiralling costs.

Rejected were bids from BAE and General Dynamics -- which had both won technology development contracts -- and Navistar. (A different unit of BAE is working on Lockheed's bid, however). Interestingly the three losers could still enter the competition because nothing prohibits them from developing JLTV designs at their own expense and offering them in the final competition for the actual production run, something Navistar has already said it "will seriously consider."

The three EMD winners' vehicles all meet the same requirements and look roughly the same, but the companies behind them have distinctly different strengths and strategies. Even the amounts they were awarded last week are not identical. Lockheed got the most, Oshkosh almost $10 million less, but, given the intense focus by both the Pentagon and Congress on affordability, Lockheed's getting more may end up being less a vote of confidence than a target painted on its back.

Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin JLTV

Engineering & Manufacturing Development award (on August 22nd): $66.3 million
Technology Development award (in 2008): $36 million
Selling point: technology

"Lockheed, from the beginning, has tried to position itself as the technology innovator" in the JLTV competition, said Loren Thompson, a defense industry consultant and analyst who is also a member of the AOL Defense Board of Contributors. Lockheed, the world's largest defense contractor, is better known for high-tech, high-cost aviation programs like the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter than for building trucks.

"This is what the business development people at Lockheed Martin would call white space, a part of the defense business they have not been in before," Thompson said. So the company has emphasized its general strengths innovating and integrating advanced technology, rather than its minimal track record specifically on ground vehicles.

It's a similar approach to the strategy Lockheed pursued, successfully, to break into shipbuilding, another corporate "white space," with the Littoral Combat Ship program. In both cases the company emphasized its high-tech expertise, but also teamed with a much smaller but more established player in the field. For LCS, Lockheed's partner is Wisconsin boat-builder Marinette Marine; for JLTV, it's BAE's Sealy, Texas division, which has built wheeled military vehicles for two decades. (The Lockheed team also originally included advanced metals specialist Alcoa, but the cost-cutting drive led Lockheed to substitute less expensive materials).

But LCS also shows the hazards of this approach: The first ships went wildly over budget -- albeit more because the Navy changed requirements than any mistake the contractors made -- and Lockheed's variant specifically came under heavy criticism for leaks and other manufacturing flaws (which the company now insists are fixed). And JLTV is a program where low cost and technical feasibility are at a premium over innovation. From the military's perspective, Lockheed's bid is arguably the high-risk, high-reward option compared to its more established, less ambitious competitors, both of which have much greater experience building military trucks: AM General and Oshkosh.

AM General

AM General JLTV

Engineering & Manufacturing Development award (on 8/22): $64.5 million
Technology Development award (in 2008): none
Selling point: history

AM General's corporate ancestor, Willys-Overland Motors, built the famous Jeep, the iconic light truck of World War II. AM General in its modern incarnation built the Humvee, which became iconic in the 1991 Gulf War. AM General built the first uparmored Humvee, the M1114, which was originally used by military police before it became de rigeur for all units against the deadly threat of roadside bombs.

But even the uparmored Humvee was sidelined in Afghanistan and Iraq, relegated to on-base duties while combat patrols were taken on by the more heavily armored MRAPs (Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected vehicles). Still, AM General has done a great deal to uparmor and upgrade the Humvee over the years. In fact, until recently, the Army was seriously considering a further evolution of the M1114-descended "expanded capability" Humvee as a lower-cost alternative to an all-new JLTV.

"We met the challenge of the last decade to protect our vehicles," AM General vice-president Chris Vanslager told AOL Defense. Now, with their JLTV offering, which AM General calls the BRV-O (pronounced "Bravo"), the company is trying to apply their experience to an all-new design that starts from a clean sheet of paper. That said, many observers still see AM General's JLTV as "evolutionary," not revolutionary -- which in today's risk-averse budget environment is not by any means a bad thing.

AM General's greatest strength is arguably its proven skill in manufacturing military vehicles. That asset has been enhanced by a key personnel change last year, said Loren Thompson: "I think the secret ingredient in the AM General offering was actually their CEO Charlie Hall," formerly of General Dynamics. "Charlie Hall is a manufacturing guru, [and] he brought a lot of credibility to the AM general team."

Oshkosh

Oshkosh JLTV

Engineering & Manufacturing Development award (on 8/22): $56.4 million
Technology Development award (in 2008): none
Selling point: incumbency

Until just three years ago, Oshkosh was a second-tier player in the military market. The company manufactured a Marine Corps truck called the MTVR (Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement) but it was better known for civilian construction and emergency vehicles. But in 2009, Oshkosh won two crucial military contracts: the Army FMTV (Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles) for logistics units and the all-service M-ATV (Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected All-Terrain Vehicle) for combat patrols in Afghanistan. The company bid aggressively low to win both contracts, and many observers thought Oshkosh could never make its "unbelievable" cost targets -- but it delivered.

As the latest, lightest, and most mobile member of the MRAP family, the M-ATV is the closest thing to the JLTV in the current inventory, which means Oshkosh is the closest thing to an incumbent in the current competition. Oshkosh has reduced weight, improved the suspension, and increased speed from their M-ATV to their JLTV offering, but their fundamental selling point is continuity and low cost. (Click here for video and detailed coverage of the Oshkosh contender, which the company calls the L-ATV). AM General's Humvee has the history, but Oshkosh's M-ATV dominates the market today.

That almost-incumbent status is an advantage for Oshkosh, but by no means a decisive one. "To me the most interesting thing about this downselect is that there is no clear favorite," said Loren Thompson. "Every one of these teams is capable of delivering, and everyone brings something unique to the table, so it's going to be a tight competition."

buglerbilly
30-08-12, 03:32 PM
Weighing the Humvee’s replacement

By Walter Pincus, Thursday, August 30, 7:12 AM

The Washington Post

Eight days ago, the Army awarded contracts worth $99.5 million to three defense corporate teams for the engineering and manufacturing development phase of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV).

Don’t be put off by the name. What’s involved is the replacement for the Humvee (High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle), which in 1985 replaced the venerable World War II Jeep and its successor versions that were produced for the military services from the 1940s through the 1970s.

The new vehicles are to be able to travel through all types of terrain and be “equipped to link into current and future tactical data [networks],” according to a Congressional Research Service (CRS) report on the JLTV released in January. They also are to be survivable with adequate armor and transportable by ship, airplane and helicopter. In addition, they are to be “more mechanically reliable [and] maintainable” than the Humvees and contain onboard diagnostic equipment, the CRS study said.

The Army, in offering this development contract, said it was seeking two types of JLTV. One would be for two passengers to be used as a utility truck. The other, a four-passenger version, would have two platforms, one for use as a close-combat weapons carrier, the other for general purposes. They all would have a companion trailer and be configured to install special “mission packages.”

Here is the number worth remembering. The Army said in its January solicitation that it had a goal of “no greater than $250,000” for the average cost of all configurations, “including all direct and indirect costs.” Put another way, that $250,000 is to be “the price of the vehicle rolling off the (assembly) line,” the document said. The Army’s fully equipped JLTV some five years ago was originally estimated to cost $418,000, according to the CRS.

A few things the Army wants this vehicle to do: travel 300 miles at 35 mph on a tank of fuel; continuously ascend a 5 percent grade at 60 mph; and drive off an 18-inch vertical step at 15 mph without any mechanical damage to the vehicle.

Tracking the six-year history of the JLTV program illustrates the time and complications for major U.S. weapons systems and recent efforts to control costs as the Defense Department faces the possibility of budget cuts.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff’s Joint Requirement Oversight Council approved the JLTV program in November 2006, but it took until late December 2007 before the DOD approved going from concept to seeking development contracts.

In fact, the Army — partnered with the Marines — redrafted an October 2007 request for industry JLTV proposals because John Young, then-DOD acquisition czar, said the project needed a more “robust technology development phase.”

The eventual proposal released in February 2008 covered 27 months — the first 15 months devoted to building four preliminary JLTV configurations and the last 12 months for testing them.

In October 2008, three companies were awarded a total of $166 million in contracts for this first development phase. That award was unsuccessfully contested by two of the losing corporate teams, which caused another three-month delay. The first phase, set to end in June 2011, was pushed to January 2012.

Another reason for the delay was that the Army in February 2011 changed requirements, which caused more delays and cost increases. The Army wanted additional under-body protection for the JLTV based on experience in Afghanistan with improvised explosive devices.

Because of the added weight of additional armor, the Army dropped the general purpose vehicle, which became too heavy for helicopters. It limited development to a two-passenger combat support vehicle that can carry 5,100 pounds and haul a 105mm howitzer or a small radar.

The four-passenger combat tactical vehicle can carry a tube-launched anti-tank guided missile and fire weapons such as a 50-caliber machine gun for use in urban operations.

Faced with the added weight and a projected per-unit cost of some $300,000, the Marines expressed concern and looked at upgrading their 22,000 Humvees at a lesser price.

Congress also voiced doubts. In September 2011 the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee recommended ending the program and upgrading the Army and Marines Humvees.

On Oct. 3, 2011, the Army announced the broad provisions of the engineering and development contract it awarded last week. Along with the target cost stated as $230,000 to $270,000, it added an armor kit, which could not cost more than $50,000 per vehicle. The next phase would be for 32 months.

The contract said the Army would procure at least 20,000 JLTVs with options to buy up to 50,000. Also, the production phase contract solicitation would be offered in 2015 with a fixed-price award going to a single winner, probably in 2016 — 10 years after the Joint Chiefs’ groups approved the idea.

The Marines are planning to buy 5,500 and the Navy perhaps 500.

A year from now I plan to check to see where this JLTV procurement program stands and whether the per-vehicle price is the same.

buglerbilly
01-09-12, 12:51 AM
Navistar Files JLTV Protest; Humvee Replacement Will Probably Top $15.5B

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

Published: August 31, 2012



UPDATED: JLTV program is now on hold, probably for months, while the GAO resolves a protest from rejected bidder, Navistar.

Buy 54,599 armored trucks at $250,000 each and that works out to roughly $13.6 billion.

That's the military's current plan to build Joint Light Tactical Vehicles (JLTVs), which will replace most of the Army and Marine Corps' vulnerable Humvees and unmaneuverable MRAPs (The program is now on hold, probably for months, while the GAO resolves a protest from rejected bidder Navistar). But the full cost to the taxpayer will be much higher, even if the program meets its ambitious target price per vehicle -- and the pressure to cut back quantities will be intense.

The Pentagon has not released an estimate for the total cost of the JLTV program, and -- after several days of discussions with AOL Defense -- the program office declined to issue one. With at least three companies still in competition (Lockheed, Oshkosh, and AM General), the final design undecided, and production not scheduled to start until 2015, there are simply too many unknowns in the acquisition costs alone. (Operating, maintaining, and supporting the vehicles over decades of service is often more expensive than buying them in the first place; the program expects to have some estimates by year's end). But sources in the Defense Department, industry, and Congress isolated the variables for AOL Defense.

First off, add to the estimated $13.6 billion to buy the vehicles another billion to develop them. Research, development, testing, and engineering work on JLTV will cost $944 million by the time it's complete in 2017, said JLTV Deputy Project Manager Pamela Demeulenaere in an email to AOL Defense. Some of that goes directly to the competing companies. The Pentagon awarded contracts for technology development in 2008 and contracts for the next phase, engineering and manufacturing development, last week. The rest goes to the government's own extensive test activities -- it would be unwise just to take the companies' word for what their vehicles can do -- and to the administrative overhead to run the program.

Now we're already up to $14.6 billion. But wait, there's more.

The $250,000 target price for each JLTV is what the government is willing to pay the winning contractor (whoever it turns out to be) for the vehicle. It doesn't include the cost to the government to manage the program or to field the vehicles to units once they're delivered. It doesn't even include everything the Pentagon will have to pay to industry, because it's just the basic cost of a vanilla JLTV, not one fully kitted out for combat. Before roadside bombs and guerrilla ambushes made every supply convoy a combat operation, the military could use unarmored trucks without weapons or radios to call for backup. Not any more.

The basic $250K JLTV will include extensive built-in protection -- what's called the A-kit. But troops will be able to bolt on additional armor for high-risk operations -- the B-kit. The military doesn't need to buy a B-kit for every single vehicle, but one for every three JLTVs is a likely ratio, and the cost per B-kit is at least $50,000, so estimate another $910 million. That takes the program at about $15.5 billion.

The cost for an M153 CROWS remotely-operated weapons station -- a kind of remote-controlled turret that lets the crew aim and fire from inside the armored cab instead of exposing themselves in an open hatch -- is about a third of a million dollars, going by the latest contract to manufacturer Kongsberg. But you have to add to that the cost of the actual weapon in the turret (typically a machinegun or a rocket launcher), then subtract the fact that not every JLTV will be armed. What vehicles get which weapons is a decision the military hasn't made yet. As a guesstimate, if the one JLTV in three that gets an additional armor B-kit is also armed with CROWS, that adds $5.9 billion, putting the program's total cost over $21 billion. However, since CROWS is a separate contract we won't attach that cost to the JLTV program.

Every JLTV is likely to have a digital radio and GPS map to show its own and friendly forces' locations. Since the cancellation of the JTRS Ground Mobile Radio, the Army's baseline radio for combat vehicles has been the Harris PRC-117, and every vehicle gets at least a Blue Force Tracker (BFT) GPS map -- but unit leaders require more elaborate command networks and higher-bandwidth radios to run them. The exact kit and cost vary widely depending on the size and type of unit that the leader commands, and the Army is reorganizing its brigades anyway, so here again the total cost is unguessable. And those are separate programs.

After that, we're getting into variables too variable even to guess.

There's also a host of specialized equipment some units will buy for some JLTVs. For example, the Marines like to equip their vehicles with "deep fording" kits to drive through surf in landing operations. Some of the add-ons will be billed to the JLTV program, but others will be bought under separate accounts. So the question marks keep proliferating, but it's pretty clear the total cost of the JLTV program could climb north of $20 billion -- if the current plan holds.

The competing companies swear they can make the $250,000 cost target for the vehicle itself (not counting weapons, radios, b-kits, government overhead, etc. etc.), but it's an ambitious target. Plenty of programs go over budget. Conversely, as budgets tighten, the economy limps along and the strategic "rebalancing" to the Pacific shifts attention and funding from ground forces to the Air Force and Navy, there may well be considerable pressure to trim the JLTV program.

The Marines have already scaled down their JLTV buy to get to the current 5,500, which would replace only one in four of their Humvees. It's possible they would go lower but it's not likely, especially since they will currently get the first vehicles off the production line.

The Army's 49,099-vehicle buy, however, is spread out over many more years, exposing it to many more uncertainties and it's a softer number to begin with. The service is not only cutting back on its number of brigades but reorganizing those brigades to centralize many support elements, which would allow reductions in the total number of trucks. Last year, the Army stated a minimum objective of 20,000 JLTVs -- enough to replace all its MRAPs but not most of its Humvees -- which would slash the program quantity in half.

Cutting the quantity in half, however, would not halve the cost. That $250,000 per vehicle is actually an "average unit manufacturing cost." The first vehicles off the production line will cost much more, the later vehicles much less as industry perfects its processes and economies of scale come into play. Slashing the quantity sacrifices efficiencies of scale, so you never get to those later, cheaper vehicles, driving the average cost way up. And as managers of fighter programs know all too well, that creates political pressure to cut the program further, which raises average cost still more. Once a program gets into this "death spiral," it's anyone's guess how low the total numbers go -- or how high the average price.

buglerbilly
01-09-12, 01:09 AM
Navistar Files Protest, JLTV Program Comes To Halt

Aug. 31, 2012 - 05:48PM

By PAUL MCLEARY

The $14 billion U.S. Army/Marine Corps Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program was put on hold Friday afternoon when Navistar, one of the three bidders not issued an engineering, manufacturing and development (EMD) contract on Aug. 22, filed a protest with the Government Accountability Office.

In an email, Navistar spokeswoman Elissa Koc wrote, “following our debrief with the government, the company has concerns regarding the selection process and we’ve requested a review.”

BAE Systems and Northrop Grumman also failed to win EMD contracts. BAE spokesperson Stephanie Bissell Serkhoshian said that while the company attended the source selection evaluation results debrief Aug. 30, the company is “currently considering how to proceed. At this time no decision has been made.” When reached for comment, a General Dynamics official said the company has made no final decision on the way forward. The Army has not returned a request for comment.

Navistar submitted its Saratoga light tactical vehicle to the program office in March, but was shut out of the EMD phase on Aug. 22, when three $60 million contracts were awarded to Lockheed Martin, Oshkosh and AM General to work on the 27-month EMD portion of the competition, in which they’ll have 14 months to deliver 22 prototype vehicles.

buglerbilly
04-09-12, 11:14 PM
Navistar Withdraws JLTV Protest

Sep. 4, 2012 - 11:27AM

By PAUL MCLEARY

In a surprising turn of events, Navistar has withdrawn the protest it filed with the Government Accountability Office on Aug. 31 over the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program.

Company spokeswoman Elissa Koc said Sept. 4 in an email that “Navistar did file a protest with the GAO Friday. Following our debrief with the government, the company had concerns regarding the selection process and we had limited time to submit our filing. Today, Navistar decided to withdraw its protest.”

When the company filed the protest, it appeared that the $14 billion U.S. Army / Marine Corps program had been put on hold. But now it looks like the 27-month engineering, manufacturing, and development portion of the program is back on track, with teams being led by Lockheed Martin, Oshkosh, and AM General free to continue work on their designs. The bidders will have 14 months to deliver 22 prototype vehicles to the government for evaluation.

buglerbilly
04-09-12, 11:20 PM
Secret JLTV Bidder Unveiled

Sep. 4, 2012 - 05:48PM

By PAUL McLEARY

It turns out there weren’t six bidders competing for the latest Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) developmental contract — there were seven.

Hardwire LLC, maker of the Structural Blast Chimney technology that funnels the energy created by an underbelly explosion up through the vehicle, had submitted an unpublicized bid to the JLTV program office, but was not awarded one of the engineering, manufacturing and development (EMD) contracts given to Lockheed Martin, Oshkosh and AM General on Aug. 22.

In the first public confirmation of its bid, Hardwire said in a statement on Sept. 4 that “Hardwire LLC, with a strong team, was the seventh prime that submitted a JLTV proposal. The vehicle had a hybrid electric drive train. At this time, we have no further comment.”

Multiple requests for comment sent to the Army/Marine Corps JLTV program office went unreturned, so it is unclear why Hardwire’s submission was shrouded in such secrecy.

Navistar protested on Aug. 31 the Army’s decision to award EMD contracts to three of its rivals (only to pull back the protest on Sept. 4), and a BAE Systems spokeswoman said that “while we are disappointed that the U.S. Army has bypassed our JLTV offering for the EMD phase, we respect their decision and will not contest it.”

Navistar has hinted that it may resubmit its bid when the competition is reopened after the EMD phase is completed in 27 months, but BAE said that it had not made a decision about its next step.

Hardwire’s chimney technology was unveiled at the Association of the United States Army annual convention in Washington in October 2010, where it was displayed on an AM General-produced Humvee. (Hardwire and AM General had teamed up on the demonstration.)

The chimney had been developed though a collaboration between Hardwire and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in 2009, company officials said at the time.

At the show, AM General and Hardwire displayed a 7-ton Humvee in an art gallery close to the convention center in downtown Washington, and only allowed military officials and select VIP’s in for a look.

George Tunis, Hardwire’s chairman and CEO, told Defense News after the show that the system had been tested multiple times at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland. While the chimney would not replace the need for a blast-deflecting V-hull on combat vehicles, he said, it would instead direct the energy toward the center of the vehicle, where it would then be pushed up through the chimney. The thrust of the blast traveling upward would also drive the vehicle back onto to the ground.

When a blast struck the underbelly of a vehicle, the chimney technology would mean that a 15,000-pound vehicle would weigh closer 60,000 pounds, because the force of the blast traveling through the center of the vehicle would push the vehicle back down.

buglerbilly
05-09-12, 09:15 PM
Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV): Background and Issues for Congress

(Source: Congressional Research Service; issued August 27, 2012)

The Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) is being developed by the Army and the Marine Corps as a successor to the High Mobility, Multi-Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) that have been in service since 1985.

On October 28, 2008, three awards were made for the JLTV Technology Development (TD) Phase to three industry teams: (1) BAE Systems, (2) the team of Lockheed Martin and General Tactical Vehicle, and (3) AM General and General Dynamics Land Systems.

Once testing was completed and technology requirements established, a full and open competition was expected to be conducted in the late summer of 2011 for the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) Phase; the Department of Defense (DOD) planned to award two contracts for the EMD phase, which was scheduled to last 24 months.

In February 2011, it was announced that the award of the EMD contract would be delayed until January or February 2012 because the Army changed requirements for the JLTV. DOD had planned to award two contracts for the EMD phase, which was scheduled to last 24 months, but instead proposed a 48-month-long EMD. There will be two JLTV variants—a Combat Tactical Vehicle (CTV) that can transport four passengers and carry 3,500 pounds and a Combat Support Vehicle (CSV) that can transport two passengers and carry 5,100 pounds.

On January 26, 2012, the Army issued the Request for Proposal (RFP) for the JLTV’s EMD phase. Up to three EMD contracts may be awarded, and contract award was scheduled for June 2012. The EMD phase will last 27 months, and vendors will be required to provide 22 prototypes for testing 12 months after contract award.

The target cost for the base vehicle is $250,000 excluding add-on armor and other kits. Reports suggest that due to an increased number of JLTV EMD phase competitors—up from three to six—the EMD contract award will be delayed until July 2012.

On August 22, 2012, the Army announced the award of three firm-fixed JLTV EMD contracts totaling approximately $185 million. The three companies awarded the EMD contracts were AM General, LLC (South Bend, IN); Lockheed Martin Corporation (Grand Prairie, TX); and Oshkosh Corporation (Oshkosh, WI).

Australia is reportedly “not committed” to participating in the EMD phase, and the new RFP has no Australia-specific requirements—such as right-hand drive. Furthermore, the Australian Ministry of Defense (MOD) is said to be looking at a domestic variant of the JLTV, although they stated that they would continue to monitor the JLTV program.

That's an understatement! I'd be astonished if Australia went with JLTV and I don't particularly see any benefit in doing so................

The FY2013 Budget Request for JLTVs is $72.3 million for Army Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) and $44.5 million for Marine Corps RDT&E, for a program total of $116.8 million. The House and Senate Armed Services Committees as well as the House Appropriations Committee have recommended fully funding the Administration’s FY2013 JLTV Budget Request.

Potential issues for Congress include clarification of foreign participation in the JLTV program, given Australia’s apparent non-participation, and how the Army’s upcoming study to revise overall tactical wheeled vehicle requirements might affect the JLTV program. This report will be updated.

As the CRS has no public website, this report is hosted by the Federation of American Scientists.

Click here for the full report (13 pages in PDF format) on the FAS website.

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/weapons/RS22942.pdf

-ends-

buglerbilly
06-09-12, 11:05 PM
Oshkosh Defense receives USMC MTVR order

06 September 2012 - 16:21 by the Shephard News Team



Oshkosh Defense has received a delivery order from the US Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) for more than Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacements (MTVR). Production on the vehicles will begin in April 2013 and be completed in September 2014, with a total order value of more than $67 million.

The MTVR is the medium-payload vehicle for the US Marine Corps (USMC) and US Navy Seabees, and has been used extensively in Iraq and Afghanistan. According to the company, the MTVRs delivered under this order will support marines and seabees in ‘a wide array of tactical missions and on the most challenging terrain’.

The MTVR is available in several variants for the transportation of troops, materials and equipment. The vehicle uses the Oshkosh-patented TAK-4 independent suspension system to achieve a 70 percent off-road profile capability and 16 inches of independent wheel travel for extensive cross-country operations.

Oshkosh has delivered more than 11,000 MTVRs to the US Marines and US Navy Seabees to date. MTVR variants being produced under this order include the MK25 Cargo, and MK27 and MK28 Extended Cargo trucks.

buglerbilly
10-09-12, 02:31 PM
Italy Develops, Buys Vehicles Despite Defense Cuts

Sep. 10, 2012 - 05:01AM

By TOM KINGTON


MRAPs, Italian-style: Iveco’s VTMM is the basis for the Italian Army’s new bombclearing package of Italian-developed vehicles and systems. (Bradley Peniston / Staff)

Amid aggressive defense budget cuts underway in Italy, one area of development is proving resilient: vehicle programs.

Italy is planning a new package of IED-clearing vehicles and systems developed by Italian industry for the Army, including ground radar and pushed decoy trolleys. An Army official said the equipment could be deployed in Afghanistan in 2013.

Meanwhile, Italy is pressing on with the acquisition of light multirole vehicles and upgrades to the Centauro wheeled tank.

Vehicle development is faring better than other areas of the Italian defense budget due to their mission. The preamble to this year’s defense budget document outlined the need to trim big-ticket programs such as F-35 joint strike fighters and delay others, but said programs that augment force protection in theater would be a priority.

After relying on vehicles such as the IED-resistant Cougar and Buffalo in Afghanistan, the Army’s new anti-IED package is based on the 18-ton VTMM four-wheel drive vehicle built by Italy’s Iveco. The vehicle — known internationally as the medium protected vehicle — uses pushed and wheeled decoys provided by European missile house MBDA.

This year’s Italian defense budget allocates 120 million euros ($151 million) for the purchase of 40 VTMMs plus logistics, with an option for 40 more, and Iveco is planning to deliver the first vehicle to the Italian Army by year’s end. The vehicles are designed to travel in a group of five, known as a route clearance package, and the first group could be in action in Afghanistan next year, said Col. Enrico Rinaldi, head of the Army’s mobility systems office.

In a typical setup, the leading vehicle pushes a wheeled decoy, dubbed the Calife 3 and supplied by MBDA Italy. The decoy is derived from the Souvim 2 system developed by MBDA in France, which built four prototypes for the French Defense Ministry.

“The Italian military approached MBDA and we proposed adapting the system to the new vehicles,” an MBDA manager said. “The planning of the Calife system is Italo-French,” he added. MBDA’s work in the area derives from its ownership of Matra.

The decoy consists of a trolley extending 3.5 meters ahead of the vehicle, with six wheels and rollers at the front to detonate any pressure-detonated IEDs thanks to the 800-kilogram weight of the trolley. Trip-wire activators extend to the sides and above the trolley, while an infrared activator is designed to set off bombs triggered by the infrared signature of passing vehicles.

The distance between the front of the trolley and the vehicle is considered a safe distance should the decoy trigger an explosion.

A second vehicle in the convoy is designed to push a decoy that carries a ground-penetrating radar supplied by Niitek — the U.S. firm now owned by Chemring — which has already supplied systems to U.S. forces in Afghanistan. Both decoys can be lifted off the road surface to avoid obstacles.

“The five vehicles are designed to work together, although not necessarily in that order,” Rinaldi said. ”It depends on the mission. The radar could go first.”

A third vehicle carries a mounted mechanical arm to dig up identified explosives, while the fourth and fifth will carry a Selex reconnaissance suite with radio and data transmission. They will also be available for troop transport.

“The Italian solution includes command-and-control and intelligence functions, and we may look to further strengthen that function, as well as introducing more robots in the mission,” Rinaldi said.

Vehicles will receive Oto Melara Hitfist turrets with 12.7mm guns and all will be equipped with the Selex Guardian jammer system, officials said.

“The first complete package will be delivered by 2013 and the bulk of deliveries will occur in 2014,” said Flavio Marchesoni, Iveco sales and marketing director.

Italy is operating a leased Maxxpro vehicle with a pushed decoy in Afghanistan.

Iveco, which developed the VTMM with Germany’s Krauss-Maffei Wegmann, also this summer delivered to the Italian Army the first of 12 ambulance format vehicle, which have extra space in the rear compared to the anti-IED versions. All 12 ambulances will be delivered by the end of 2013, Marchesoni said, and the first could be deployed to Afghanistan before the end of 2013.

Other models of the VTMM the Army is mulling include an electronic warfare version, a radio rebroadcasting version and a command post vehicle. An explosive ordnance disposal version that could host a robot for bomb disposals is also being considered, an industrial source said.

Separately, Iveco is due to deliver more than 150 new, 1A version light multirole vehicles (LMVs) to the Army by the end of 2012, part of a total order of 479, bringing the total number of LMVs ordered by Italy to more than 1,800. The vehicle, compared to an uparmored Humvee, has also been sold to the U.K. and other militaries.

While Oto Melara is equipping LMVs with its Hitfist turret, Iveco said it is also supplying a protected ring mount for an alternative, manned roof gun, and is delivering a total of 200 ring mounts in the latest format, with 100 delivered by year’s end.

Iveco and Oto Melara are also working on an upgrade of their wheeled Centauro tank for the Italian Army. A pre-series version, ordered last year under a 46 million euro contract, will be delivered in 2014, an industry official said. It will feature a 120mm gun, unlike the 105mm gun on Italy’s current versions, and offer a new hull incorporating innovations that both companies have used on their Freccia wheeled armored vehicle, as well as a new V-8, 720-horsepower engine, increased protection and full digitalization.

buglerbilly
12-09-12, 12:10 PM
Russia looks to abandon foreign-sourced tactical missile tractors

By Peter Dunai

9/11/2012

Russia is reportedly looking to retire foreign-made heavy-duty wheeled tractor units currently used as platforms for mobile air defence and related systems in favour of domestic solutions: a move apparently intended to offset Moscow's growing reliance on advanced foreign military solutions.

The decision is expected to lead to the broad retirement of heavy-duty vehicles provided by the Minsk Wheeled Tractor Plant (MZKT): a former key component of the Soviet-era military industrial base that now sits beyond Russia's border in Belarus. The principal products of MZKT are the 8x8 MAZ-543 truck and the MAZ-527 tractor trucks. The MZKT platforms have been a mainstay of Russia's wheeled artillery fleet since the 1970s, and also feature extensively in the export market where they are sold as a mobility platform for Russian solutions.

MZKT currently supplies special wheeled chassis for the Iskander ballistic missile, the MLR Uragan, Smerch, Grad, Tor, and Buk (export versions), as well as for the S-300 and S-400 missile defence systems. All the mobile systems of the Russian Strategic Missile Forces (RVSN) use the MZKT chassis.

buglerbilly
13-09-12, 02:38 PM
RAF Force Protection Wing trials the new Foxhound armoured vehicle

An Equipment and Logistics news article

12 Sep 12

Members of No 5 RAF Force Protection Wing based at Camp Bastion in Helmand province, Afghanistan, have become amongst the very first Service personnel in the region to operate Foxhound, the MOD's latest protected patrol vehicle.


Personnel from No 5 RAF Force Protection Wing trial the new Foxhound armoured vehicle whilst providing external security for Camp Bastion in Afghanistan
[Picture: Corporal Laura Bibby RAF, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Personnel from No 5 RAF Force Protection Wing, which includes 51 Squadron RAF Regiment, form part of the Bastion Force Protection Wing with No 2 (Tactical) Police Squadron, working alongside members of the Tonga Defence Services and the Royal Artillery in order to keep the camp and its 28,000 personnel safe.

Members of the Bastion Force Protection Wing have been some of the first within the defence community to use the Foxhound protected patrol vehicle in an operational environment and are extremely impressed with the results.

Foxhound is a British-built, purpose-designed vehicle which makes use of the very latest advanced technology. For a means of transport of its size the Foxhound offers superior levels of blast protection for the RAF Police and RAF Regiment using the vehicle around Camp Bastion where the threat of improvised explosive devices is always present.

Being lighter and smaller than other protected vehicles such as Mastiff and Ridgback, Foxhound brings a whole new capability to the Force Protection Wing and is ideal for personnel operating in partnering roles and engaging with local communities.

The Foxhound's innovative design features mean that the whole engine can be removed in just 30 minutes and it can still be driven with just three wheels, allowing it to be driven away in an emergency situation.

Corporal Fraser Bruce is an RAF policeman working in the Bastion Security Squadron. He said:

"Along with members of my section, a few weeks ago we undertook local training on how to drive and operate Foxhound. Now that the first vehicles have been released to us, we're keen to make the very best use of it. This is a cracking bit of kit."


Foxhound armoured vehicles out on patrol around Camp Bastion
[Picture: Corporal Laura Bibby RAF, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Squadron Leader Rich Curzon is the Officer Commanding the Bastion Security Squadron. He said:

"Foxhound's arrival provides my troops with first-rate protective equipment, the very best they can get."

"We are simply pleased to be able to put Foxhound straight into operational use," he added.

Squadron Leader Jim Stewart, Chief of Staff for the Bastion Force Protection Wing, said:

"The arrival of Foxhound onto the Force Protection Wing is an enormous leap forward in capability; the off-road mobility, enhanced protection and night-vision systems that it offers to the troops on the ground are unmatched in a vehicle of this size.

"From a logistics perspective, it will offer significant benefits to the mechanics in terms of reliability over Vixen."

"It is the ideal platform for the operations being conducted by the RAF Regiment and RAF Police around Camp Bastion," he concluded.

A total of 325 new vehicles will eventually be delivered to the MOD under a contract worth £430m that is providing around 750 highly-skilled jobs across the UK.

buglerbilly
18-09-12, 02:18 PM
BAE Systems Debuts Latest RG35 Multi-Role Fighting Vehicle at Africa Aerospace and Defence Exhibition

(Source: BAE Systems; issued Sept. 18, 2012)



BAE Systems today launched the latest 6x6 variant of the RG35 family of vehicles – the RG35 multi-purpose blast protected fighting vehicle – at the 2012 Africa Aerospace and Defence exhibition (AAD).

“The RG35 family of vehicles incorporates 30 years of experience in tactical mobility and protection,” said Johan Steyn, managing director, Land Systems South Africa.

The RG35 6x6 has an 8.5 ton payload, a 12 cubic meters volume under armor, can seat up to 14 crew members, and carry light and medium remote controlled weapon stations. Like the 4x4 variant, the latest 6x6 variant includes independent suspension and a side mounted powerpack that can be replaced in less than one hour.

The RG35 family of vehicles can be deployed in many different roles and offers a choice of variants and configurations while maintaining 80 percent vehicle commonality. RG35 combines the high levels of survivability of the RG31 Mine Protected Vehicle with the tactical capability of an infantry fighting vehicle.

Integrated onto the vehicle at AAD will be the TRT-B25 (Tactical Remote Turret) also from Land Systems South Africa.

Visit BAE Systems Land Systems South Africa on stand 4W17.

-ends-

buglerbilly
18-09-12, 10:48 PM
AAD 12: Paramount launches new vehicle variant

18 September 2012 - 16:50 by Beth Stevenson in Pretoria



South African company Paramount Group has used its local Africa Aerospace and Defence exhibition to launch the Marauder Patrol highly protected utility vehicle.

Announced by the company at the show in Pretoria on 18 September, the platform is a family extension of the Marauder, and the patrol variant aims to 'set a new standard in protected utility vehicles', a Paramount statement said.

It is aimed at police and military, in particular special forces, that 'require an agile and quick response vehicle for use in tough environments.

'The Marauder Patrol is protected to STANAG level 1 ballistic protection, meaning it can stop shell fragments as well as 7.62mm and 5.56mm bullets,' the company said. 'For those customers wanting extra protection, there is the choice to increase ballistic to STANAG 2, without impacting the performance of the vehicle.'

Options include a five-door version to carry nine people, or a four-door one for five people. It is based on 'COTS driveline components', and other options include run-flat tyre inserts, communications systems, add-on armour, a range of weapon stations and automatic transmission.

'Marauder Patrol breaks new ground in the utility vehicle market because it offers high levels of protection combined with unprecedented mobility and supportability,' Miles Chambers, business development director said.

'As governments seek to cope with a range of new security challenges, it is vehicles such as this that give them the flexibility to respond to a variety of threats without having to rely on more expensive or aggressive looking large scale armoured vehicles.'

He added that South Africa has the heritage and experience to provide innovative solutions worldwide in terms of armoured vehicles.

buglerbilly
19-09-12, 10:01 PM
AAD 12: NORINCO Light Strike Vehicle makes international debut

19 September 2012 - 17:11 by Beth Stevenson in Pretoria



The so-called Chinese Hummer.............

The China North Industries Corporation (NORINCO) has exhibited the CS/VA1 Light Strike Vehicle internationally for the first time at the Africa Aerospace and Defence (AAD) exhibition.

'It includes the next generation of military chassis,' Wang Xuesong, Africa-America department regional marketing chief told Shephard at AAD in Pretoria, South Africa, on 19 September. The weapon system can fire international-standard ammunition making it ideal for export, she added.

It is based on PLA specifications, but can be changed to meet other requirements and the weapon turret was designed so that a variety of systems can be integrated.

The options include the CS/LM5 12.7mm rotary machine gun, a 40mm automatic grenade launcher or the 12.7mm/0.50 inch heavy machine gun, which adheres to NATO standards.

It can rotate 360 degrees, and other options include 1,000 or 2,000 rounds/minute.

Although the PLA is its main customer, the company has recognised the needs required for export custom and has included them in some of its system designs including international standards for ammunition. This includes the SH1 155mm self-propelled howitzer which has NATO-standard ammunition, a feature that identifies it was intended for the export market.

'We manufacture everything for the army's requirements,' Wang explained. 'In China we are the biggest supplier- some 90-95% of the army's equipment.'

This is the same vehicle with a rapid-firing 81mm mortar on board..............

buglerbilly
20-09-12, 01:40 PM
AAD 2012: DCD Mountain Lion III passes UAE trials

20 September 2012 - 9:41 by Beth Stevenson in Pretoria



DCD Protected Mobility has announced that its Mountain Lion III armoured utility vehicle passed the UAE's Summer Trials in July.

Speaking to Shephard at the Africa Aerospace and Defence exhibition in Pretoria, South Africa, on 19 September, a company representative said that it 'performed best in its class' in the annual four week trial, which saw 12 vehicles made by different manufacturers demonstrate and test their systems in a variety of terrains.

'Our vehicle did very well and there were a few alterations that they suggested,' he explained.

It was the first four wheel drive to pass the trials, and as well as the four-wheel steer system the vehicle has independent suspension and 'intelligent damping', which reduces the turning circle to 12 metres.

It also has blast-attenuating seats and energy-absorbing floor panels for enhanced crew protection, features a 360 HP engine with six-speed automatic transmission, and a ring mount, which can carry a range of main weapon stations, is fitted to the vehicle.

The spokesperson added that it has also been independently tested in the US, and the Mountain Lion is three quarters through blast test qualifications, with the last one due in November. It is aiming for STANAG blast level 3-4, independent blast test evaluation is being conducted through the CSIR.

Meanwhile in the past month the company acquired the Springbuck Armoured Personnel Carrier range from Drakensberg Truck Manufacturers.



The acquisition was made in an effort ot extend the company's vehicle portfolio.

The representative also added that the company is focusing on localising business in order to facilitate export orders, as well as partnering with local companies.

buglerbilly
20-09-12, 01:55 PM
QinetiQ Goes to Market with Q-Net II

(Source: QinetiQ; issued September 19, 2012)

LONDON --- Building on the combat experience of the delivery of over 11,000 Q-Net rocket propelled grenade protection systems, QinetiQ has unveiled Q-Net II to the defence market.

QinetiQ is delighted to announce that the high probability of defeat has been further increased in Q-Net II along with further weight reductions. This follows operational feedback and extensive testing of the upgrade. The latest system will deliver increased benefits to users in terms of both survivability and platform performance, particularly over bar armour solutions.

The patented Q-Net design consists of a net with embedded metal nodes supported on a lightweight frame that surrounds and stands off from the outside of the vehicle. The armour system defeats RPG threats by preventing detonation, with the nodes disrupting the fusing of the warhead. It provides multi-hit capability protection from all angles (360 degrees) including overhead if specified. On-going developments have led to improvements in the Q-Net design from that originally fielded.

The Q-Net II upgrade increases the probability of defeating the threat to a very high level and further reduces the system weight. The latest upgrade to the system is flexible and modular, featuring a patented hook-and-loop installation material that attaches the net to the frames. Frames can be made to collapse or fold if required during missions. Q-Net has been designed to maintain crew ingress/egress and access to externally fitted components such as fuel tank filler caps and storage bins. In addition, all round visibility is maintained whilst protecting the cockpit area, unlike other armour solutions.

Developed jointly by QinetiQ North America (QNA), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the Q-Net system enhances the survivability of vehicle crews through effective protection against rocket propelled grenade strikes.

Q-Net is now on operational service with the US, French and Polish forces and a very strong contender for future contracts. QinetiQ conservatively estimates that over 32 million miles have been logged in Afghanistan on vehicles using Q-Net as their protection of choice against RPG.

Commenting on the success of QNA's Q-Net, Bert Appleton of QinetiQ's C4ISR Division, commented:

"Because of the success of Q-Net in defeating the RPG threat in Afghanistan, we are in a very strong position to convince future customers of the real value of our solution. Soldiers need to know that the system being procured is proven in a real live fire situation and we are in the unique position of being able to deliver a system that has saved lives."

"The design effort was extremely challenging, from a very aggressive vibrational envelope, to challenges in providing easy access to door handles, maintenance points on the vehicle and articulation of hatches and doors. In addition, the fielding schedule required QinetiQ to increase production deliveries to over 1000 kits per month, and sustain this rate until the order was fulfilled. QinetiQ accomplished the task on-time, on-budget and in the process developed significant experience in the design, analysis, testing, fabrication, fielding and logistical support of a large installed user base. Q-Net is a capability that has been operationally tested, is battle hardened and can be delivered to the front line very quickly.

"Q-Net was selected as the solution of choice by the US Department of Defense (DoD) for the Mine Resistant, Ambush Protected - All Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) requirement for protection against in theatre RPG threats, with an initial order for 7,500 kits."

-ends-

buglerbilly
20-09-12, 02:21 PM
This is a shot of the new version of the RG35.............Interesting to compare it with the shot used above..............

buglerbilly
20-09-12, 10:24 PM
AAD 2012: OTT launches new vehicles

20 September 2012 - 16:25 by Beth Stevenson in Pretoria



OTT Technologies has launched two new vehicles at the Africa Aerospace and Defence exhibition in South Africa. The two platforms are the Agrale Marrua M27 LAPV and the Puma M36 Mk5 MRAP.

Speaking to Shephard at the show, Hans Kriek, marketing manager at the company, said the Marrua is based on Brazilian company Agrale's vehicle, but OTT has replaced the crew cabin with a ballistic cabin for enhanced protection.

'Our cabin fits exactly in the place of the Marrua cabin, which has a lot of advantages,' Kriek explained. 'We don't change any of the automotive parts.'

He said it is aiming it at the police market, but that it also has military peacekeeping applications as well.

'In asymmetrical warfare...most operations end up being for peacekeeping. You don't have conventional military threats anymore. Therefore the equipment doesn't have to be to mil spec in all situations.

'You must be able to sustain operations economically,' he added. 'It fills the requirement for a vehicle not used in direct fighting situations but that still requires protection.'

Because of the payload capacity multiple roles can be carried out through inserting a C2 centre or adding surveillance equipment. For police use a prisoner cage can also be added, or a similar one for police or military dogs.

It is assembled in South Africa, and a demonstration vehicle is currently in Brazil. It has been in development for 6-12 months with South America and West Africa being target markets.

It is currently a left hand drive, but 'we are willing to investigate turning it into a right hand drive', Kriek explained.

Meanwhile the Puma M36 MK5 MPV was also launched, which is an ' evolutionary development of the Puma M26'.

The M26 has been operational with the Kenyan Army for some 12 months.

'With an MPV the most important part is the design of the outer body,' Kriek said. 'If you have a proven concept it is easier to improve on that; we have modified a combat-proven product.'

It uses Indian company Ashok Leyland Stallion's 4X4 automotive components. OTT works closely with the company to ensure the automotive design is within the specifications of the original design.

'We took the Puma and made it longer, higher, wider and thicker for better protection,' Kriek explained. 'We've completed a prototype and we're doing testing on it. We are ready for production.'

The M36 has been some 12 months in production, and Africa and parts of South East Asia are target markets for the vehicle.

buglerbilly
24-09-12, 10:16 PM
Inside the Foxhound

Think Defence | September 24, 2012

Images from the MoD


A Foxhound Light Protected Patrol Vehicle is put through its paces at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan.

Foxhound is at the cutting edge of protected patrol vehicle technology, providing unprecedented levels of blast protection for its size and weight. Featuring blast survivability close to that of a Mastiff - and just a little bigger than the Snatch Land Rover it replaces – the Foxhound is ideally suited for manoeuvring around the narrow backstreets of Helmand’s towns and villages. Weighing in at six tones, it has a top speed of 70mph and can do 0-50mph in just 19 seconds. Four-wheel steering makes it extra agile, with a 40ft turning circle.

This image is available for high resolution download at www.defenceimages.mod.uk subject to the terms and conditions of the Open Government License atwww.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/. Search for image number 45154367.jpg



Foxhound Light Protected Patrol Vehicle in Afghanistan


Foxhound Light Protected Patrol Vehicle in Afghanistan


Foxhound Light Protected Patrol Vehicle in Afghanistan


Foxhound Light Protected Patrol Vehicle in Afghanistan


Foxhound Light Protected Patrol Vehicle in Afghanistan

The interior of a Foxhound Light Protected Patrol Vehicle.

Foxhound is at the cutting edge of protected patrol vehicle technology, providing unprecedented levels of blast protection for its size and weight. Featuring blast survivability close to that of a Mastiff - and just a little bigger than the Snatch Land Rover it replaces – the Foxhound is ideally suited for manoeuvring around the narrow backstreets of Helmand’s towns and villages. Weighing in at six tones, it has a top speed of 70mph and can do 0-50mph in just 19 seconds. Four-wheel steering makes it extra agile, with a 40ft turning circle.

This image is available for high resolution download at www.defenceimages.mod.uk subject to the terms and conditions of the Open Government License atwww.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/. Search for image number 45154364.jpg

buglerbilly
25-09-12, 01:19 PM
Oshkosh Defense Unveils New Light Vehicle for Unconventional, Recon Missions at Modern Day Marine 2012

(Source: Oshkosh Defense; issued Sept. 24, 2012)





OSHKOSH, Wis. --- Expanding its portfolio of light military vehicles, Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, is unveiling its new Special Purpose All-Terrain Vehicle (S-ATV) designed for unconventional and reconnaissance missions at Modern Day Marine 2012, Sept. 25-27 in Quantico, Va.

Oshkosh will also have its Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV), which was selected for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase, at the show.

“We have developed a broad range of high-performance light vehicles to offer Warfighters next-generation capabilities for future battlefields,” said John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Joint and Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “Our L-ATV and S-ATV platforms, coupled with an array of Oshkosh-developed HMMWV upgrade solutions, demonstrate exciting innovations. The off-road mobility, crew protection and reliability that are hallmarks of our heavy, medium and MRAP platforms have been leveraged in different ways across these light vehicles to meet a range of operational needs.”

Oshkosh specifically designed the S-ATV based on emerging worldwide requirements for forces performing unconventional and reconnaissance missions. The S-ATV utilizes Oshkosh’s battle-proven off-road technologies and expertise to nimbly travel across rugged, remote and urban terrains at high speeds. The vehicle is available in multiple weight and protection configurations.

Delivering the Oshkosh JLTV Solution

Oshkosh received a contract in August to deliver 22 Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) prototypes for the JLTV EMD phase, as well as to support government testing and evaluation of the vehicles. The joint services are expected to replace tens of thousands of HMMWVs with the JLTV.

“The Oshkosh JLTV solution was designed with a purpose – to keep Warfighters safe on future battlefields with unpredictable terrain, tactics, and threats,” said John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Joint and Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “Oshkosh has a 90-year history of delivering high quality military vehicle programs on-time and on-budget, and our JLTV program is no exception. We understand how critical this light, protected, off-road vehicle will be to Warfighters.”

The Oshkosh L-ATV offers an advanced crew protection system that has been extensively tested and is proven to optimize crew survivability. The L-ATV can accept multiple armor configurations, which allows the vehicle to adapt easily to changing operational requirements. The L-ATV also applies the Oshkosh TAK-4i intelligent independent-suspension system to provide significantly faster speeds when operating off-road, which can be critical to troops’ safety.

Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, is an industry-leading global designer and manufacturer of tactical military trucks and armored wheeled vehicles, delivering a full product line of conventional and hybrid vehicles, advanced armor options, proprietary suspensions and vehicles with payloads that can exceed 70 tons.

-ends-

buglerbilly
26-09-12, 11:42 AM
Modern Day Marine 2012: HDT unveils Storm SRTV

25 September 2012 - 22:54 by Tony Skinner in Quantico



HDT Global used this year's Modern Day Marine exhibition to publicly display its Storm SRTV tactical all terrain vehicle for the first time.

Developed with an eye on a US Air Force (USAF) requirement for a new air deployable recovery vehicle, the Storm is designed to be driven on and off a range of fixed wing aircraft, and CH-47 and CH-53 helicopters without shoring.

Speaking to Shephard at the exhibition at Marine Corps Base Quantico, HDT vice president of communications Robin Stefanovich said the vehicle was relatively lightweight at 3651kg gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) but the 430hp mid-engine design ensured it was highly mobile.

‘What that means is that at altitude (10,000 feet) it is more deployable and provides higher horsepower than other existing vehicles can offer at sea level,’ Stefanovich argued.

According to specifications released at the exhibition, the Storm SRTV has a top speed of 161 kph, can accelerate to 100 km per hour in less than 15 seconds at GVWR, and has a ground clearance of 45.75 cm.

As well as being internally transported, the vehicle can be deployed through low velocity aerial delivery (LAPS) or guided parachutes (JPADS) methods.

Stefanovich noted that the vehicle, which can carry six passengers and up to three litters, has a 6.1 m turning diameter and its long travel suspension meant it can traverse terrain impassable to more conventional vehicles.

HDT also unveiled its Internally Transportable Vehicle (ITV), which is largely identical to the Storm but with smaller physical dimensions in order to be transported inside a V-22 Osprey tiltrotor.

The company is aiming to secure a contract for the USAF’s Guardian Angel Air-Deployable Recovery Vehicle (GAARV) requirement, which, according to a February solicitation, is seeking up to 61 vehicles to rapidly deliver rescue forces,

‘The GAARV will provide an air-deployable, surface recovery platform capable of manoeuvring over adverse terrain in order to search for and recover IP [isolated personnel] and/or equipment, while also providing the capability of transporting the RT [rescue team] and the IP from an area of high threat to a defendable location for recovery by aircraft or self recovery to the final destination,’ the solicitation said.

‘The GAARV will be able to be deployed and recovered using airdrop, on/off load, or sling load techniques, by most existing and future fixed wing and heavy vertical lift rescue aircraft.’

buglerbilly
26-09-12, 11:44 AM
More on this from Defense Update...............

September 25, 2012 at 18:00

HDT Presents the Storm SRTV for Special Ops

Posted by Tamir Eshel

HDT is showing at the Modern Day Marine its new Storm Search and Rescue Tactical Vehicle (SRTV), developed in conjunction with Special Operations Forces. The vehicle is addressing a specific requirement by the Air Force National Guard (ANG) Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) units and Special Operations Command (AFSOC) that have requested proposals for an air deployable vehicle for their ‘Guardian Angel’ teams. SRTV can carry a tactical special team of six, plus three passengers on litters.

The vehicle is based on an original design by BC Customs (BCC) of Utah, specializing in special mission off-road vehicles. This specific design shares a common platform with other models developed by BC, ustilizing common subsystems and components. In fact, at the Modern Day Marine Expo HDT displayed another vehicle, designed for internal transportation inside a V-22 Osprey. The SRTV is measured to be carried internally by the C-130, C-17, CH-47 and CH-53 but is too wide for the V-22. The V-22 compatible version can carry a team of three with two patients on litters in the roll protected cage.

The vehicle can be delivered through various methods including Low Velocity Aerial Delivery (LAPS) of via guided parachutes (JPADS) methods. The vehicle is designed to operate in difficult environmental conditions, and performs at 10,000′ (3,048 m) above mean sea level with higher horsepower levels than most vehicles of this class deliver at sea level.

Guardian Angel is an Air Force non-aircraft weapon system program designed to execute Air Force Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) and Personnel Recovery (PR) across the full spectrum of military operations. The new vehicle being considered will enable the team to infiltrate, exfiltrate and recover downed aircrew and personnel expanding the radius of operation of air-assets, enabling teams to covertly deploy from the safe landing zone on land and advance to their objective using these high performance vehicles.

To meet these goals, the SRTV is powered by a 430 Hp engine, positioned at the mid-body for maximum stability, SRTV can exceed double its curb weight in payload while performing the full spectrum of missions. Long travel suspension and optimized approach and departure angles ensure high obstacle negotiation. The vehicle can travel at a speed over 100 mph and climb vertical grades over 70 degrees, move on side slopes angles of over 60 degrees and climb vertical steps over three feet. Storm is designed to perform in extreme maneuverability in rugged environments and traverse terrain considered impassable to conventional vehicles, including vertical rock terrain.

Rapid evasive maneuverability in confined spaces is provided by highly efficient and maneuverability steering; it can turn on a 20′ (6.1 m) diameter curb to curb; maneuverability is enhanced with cutting brakes allowing U-turns on steep hills within the length and width of the vehicle, also allowing high speed J-turns.

The vehicle provides rollover safety for all occupants without limiting mission operational performance. Storm can carry up to three liters in side the rollover protection frame, without modifications, while still maintaining 360° of weapon field of fire.


Storm is designed to perform in extreme maneuverability in rugged environments and traverse terrain considered impassable to conventional vehicles, including vertical rock terrain. Photo: HDT

buglerbilly
26-09-12, 02:21 PM
Modern Day Marine: Oshkosh joins race for special operations requirement

26 September 2012 - 12:48 by Tony Skinner in Quantico



Oshkosh Defense highlighted its expanded range of light tactical vehicles with the public unveiling of its Special Purpose All-Terrain Vehicle (S-ATV) that has been designed for unconventional and reconnaissance missions.

At the Modern Day Marine exhibition at Marine Corps Base Quantico, the company displayed both the S-ATV and its Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV), which is one of three vehicles to progress to the next stage of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV).

John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Joint and Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense, told Shephard the S-ATV had been developed with internal R&D funding for unconventional and reconnaissance missions.

‘It is really aimed at those unconventional mission requirements where you require a high speed, light weight, flexible platform. It is helicopter transportable and is perfect for when you need to get off ready to fight instantly,’ he said.

Bryant noted that the vehicle had been designed to be easily reconfigurable and could accommodate two to seven passengers and a range of C4I systems, depending on the particular mission requirements. He argued that the vehicle’s TAK-4i intelligent independent-suspension system, developed from the company’s experience with the M-ATV, provided significantly faster speeds when operating off-road.

While Bryant was unwilling to disclose detailed information on the S-ATV’s diesel engine, the 300+ HP vehicle has a stated top speed of greater than 120 kph and a range of more than 500 km.

Oshkosh has responded to the US Special Operations Command’s Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV) 1.1 project with a variant of the S-ATV.

The company is one of a number known to have responded to the GMV 1.1 requirement, which includes plans to acquire up to 1,300 vehicles for special operations missions with requirements for air transportability, weapons capabilities and high mobility.

According to USSOCOM, the chosen vehicle will be a ‘highly mobile, CH-47 transportable platform’ to be equipped with a government-furnished C4ISR suite.

Industry has been told to expect contract award by January 2013 with production expected to begin in 2013 and ending mid-2020. Other companies known to have responded to the requirement include General Dynamics and Navistar Defense.

Meanwhile, in the first display of its Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) at a trade show, Oshkosh highlighted its solution for the JLTV requirement to replace tens of thousands of HMMWVs.

The company was awarded an engineering, manufacturing and development contract in August to deliver 22 L-ATV prototypes for JLTV. Fellow contenders Lockheed Martin and Navistar Defense also displayed their vehicles at the exhibition.

buglerbilly
27-09-12, 10:37 PM
JLTV competitors focus on Marine needs

By Michael Hoffman Thursday, September 27th, 2012 12:28 am



QUANTICO, Va. — The Army plans to buy ten times as many Joint Light Tactical Vehicles as the Marine Corps, yet the three defense companies selected in the latest round of the truck competition remain focused on the Corps’ priorities for the vehicle: transportability, survivavability, and affordability.

Transportability by ship and by helicopter is the clincher for Corps officials. Size and weight are two of the first questions that Marines ask defense companies to ensure the vehicle can sling load under a Ch-53 Sea Stallion and fit aboard a ship.

The Marine Corps plans to partially replace its Humvee fleet of 24,000 vehicles with the JLTV. Marine leaders want to buy at least 5,500 JLTVs starting in 2017. Leadership plans to supplement the rest of the Humvee replacement with a Humvee improvement program it will start in 2013.

Lockheed Martin, AM General and Oshkosh — the three companies awarded engineering, manufacturing and development contracts in August — displayed their versions of the JLTVat Modern Day Marine at Quantico, Va., this week. Each one said the fact the Marine Corps will buy fewer JLTVs does not make their requirements any less important.

The companies bidding on the JLTV program let out sigh of relief in 2011 when the Army and Marine Corps salvaged the program from the budget axe by compromising on JLTV requirements to make it cheaper.

One of the most notable compromises made was increasing the maximum weight of the JLTV from 12,600 pounds to 14,000 pounds to keep companies from having to use “exquisite materials” in their designs. Scrapping the titanium mufflers allowed the companies to drop the per vehicle cost to a more stomachable $250,000 per vehicle price tag for Congress.

That’s not to say the JLTV lost its requirement to sling under a Sea Knight or a Chinook keeping Marine leaders happy. John Bryant, the general manager for Joint and Marine programs at Oshkosh, said the company has a keen focus on the transportability of their vehicle.

Scott Greene, vice president of Ground Vehicles at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, said his team consistently meets with Marine leaders to make sure the vehicle is meeting their requirements.

Outside of transporting the JLTV, Marine officials are excited about the increase gas mileage the JLTV will offer versus the up armored vehicles. Whichever JLTV the Pentagon chooses will drive at 11 miles per gallon. Most MRAPs or MATVs get 5 miles per gallon or worse.

“At some point with gas costing up to $400 a gallon in theatre, the vehicle starts paying for itself,” Greene said.

The next step for the program is building 22 vehicles for the joint JLTV program office to test. Leaders from each company said the decision by Navistar to cancel their protest will help by keeping the program on schedule.

“Avoiding the protest and staying on the schedule helps us from a produce vehicles and making sure everything is ready to go,” Bryant said.

buglerbilly
30-09-12, 11:30 AM
Marine Humvees get a second life

By Michael Hoffman Thursday, September 27th, 2012 5:09 pm



QUANTICO, Va. — Many wrote off the Humvee when Army and Marine Corps officials chose to double down on the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program and scrap Humvee recapitalization plans.

However, budget realities have led the Marine Corps back to the Humvee as leaders realize they don’t have the funding to buy enough JLTVs to replace their Humvee fleet of 24,00 trucks. Right now, Marine officials expect to buy 5,500 JLTVs in 2017.

To make up for the gulf between current Humvee numbers and the planned JLTV buy, the Marine Corps will launch a Humvee improvement program. Marine acquisition leaders started a study to collect the research done in previous years by the Pentagon and industry to upgrade the Humvee.

“We’re not trying to go out and re-invent the wheel with the Humvee. We’re trying to take advantage of all the studies and efforts that have already been done,” said William Taylor, the Marine program executive officer for Land Systems.

Marine officials said the intent is not to simply restart the Humvee Recap. It is only one of the programs the Marine Corps will study as it determines its options to upgrade the Humvee.

Humvee Recap failed because the cost per vehicle came too close to the price of buying a brand new vehicle, Taylor said.

“That was the defining moment when we realized we are essentially rebuilding the Humvee and getting no better in terms of a vehicle when the price tags are almost the same,” he said after delivering a speech here at the Modern Day Marine annual conference.

This upgrade program will have a clearly defined price limitation to ensure it doesn’t meet the same fate, although that price ceiling has not been specified yet, a Marine official said.

What the Marine Corps wants to do is return the Humvee’s performance back to when it was not loaded down with so much armor, Taylor said.

“We’re trying to recapture capability that was already resident in the vehicle before we upgraded with armor,” Taylor said. “That’s the critical node in which we started to lose performance, payload and reliability when we up armored them to go into theater.”

Industry has already worked on upgrades for the Humvee to include the suspensions, drive shafts, and lightening the vehicles, Taylor said. The Corps hopes to pick and choose which ones they can afford.

“The next phase essentially tries to price those out in logical packages to see what gives us an optimum solution in terms of recapturing lost performance, lost pay load, lost reliability,” Taylor said.

This work will not affect the amount invested into the JLTV program, Taylor confirmed.

He said the Army has kept a close eye on the Marine Corps’ work with the Humvee improvement program. That’s not to say the Army will sign off on a similar Humvee upgrade.

“If this program continues to progress [the Army] will at least have interest,” Taylor said. “I don’t know if they will have a commitment to buy. They have slightly different requirements than the Marine Corps in terms of mobility.”

buglerbilly
01-10-12, 09:36 PM
Pentagon Salutes Itself for Armored Truck It Didn’t Want in the First Place

By Spencer AckermanEmail AuthorOctober 1, 2012 | 3:00 pm


Army Staff Sgt. Nicholas Amsberry guides a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle through Shorabak, Afghanistan, June 28, 2012. Photo: Flickr/Soldiersmediacenter

In a saner world, the Pentagon wouldn’t throw itself a party to celebrate its purchase of thousands of bomb-resistant trucks it didn’t want in the first place. The story of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle (MRAP) is a story of a bureaucracy that was first indifferent to the specialized, armored truck; then got pushed into buying it; and then congratulated itself for all the lives it saved in Iraq and Afghanistan. Yet on Monday afternoon, officers, bureaucrats, and even the vice president packed into the Pentagon auditorium to pat themselves on the back for the success of all the MRAPs the Pentagon resisted.

After a band played and flags waved, the head of the Pentagon’s office for buying MRAPs, Alan Shaffer, praised the “incredible effort put forward by everyone who came into contact with the MRAP program.” Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said “there was no more important program for the Department of Defense in the last decade.” Vice President Joe Biden, an MRAP advocate at the Pentagon, reminisced about how “it’s not easy to push something this big through the system this fast, but you all did it.”

Not exactly. As Danger Room has reported since the blog’s inception, the MRAP’s success in saving lives and limbs came despite the initial inclinations of bureaucrats at the Pentagon, Army and Marine Corps. They slow-walked purchasing the trucks; worried about spending too much on them; retaliated against whistleblowers who talked up the MRAP’s acquisition woes; and learned to love them only after a leadership changeover made it clear that delays wouldn’t be tolerated.

One of the main virtues of the MRAP lies in its hull. Shaped like the letter V, it disperses the blast from homemade bombs that other trucks absorb — and which kill and wound the troops inside. Soldiers and Marines who rode in them in Iraq and Afghanistan reported that sometimes they didn’t even realize they had rolled over one of the bombs.

But troops almost didn’t get the chance to ride in them. In 2007, Danger Room acquired a Marine Corps memo that warned of an “immediate need for an MRAP vehicle capability,” due to the rising volume of deadly improvised explosive devices. The memo was written in 2005 and designated as “Priority 1 Urgent.” But the Corps didn’t actually issue a formal request for buying the vehicles for another year. That first request was for a grand total of 185 trucks. When USA Today picked up the Danger Room story, it shocked the Pentagon’s top officials into taking action to buy the trucks.

Even as the military began warming to the trucks once they trickled into combat, top brass worried what they would do with all the trucks when the wars ended. Within the Pentagon, many fretted that whatever value the trucks added in Iraq and Afghanistan wouldn’t translate to other conflicts, which presumably either wouldn’t be fought on land or feature roadside bombs. Biden joked that was like not buying landing craft for the D-Day invasion because they wouldn’t be used to sweep across Europe.

To be fair, though, that was a reasonable concern. But five years later, the Afghanistan war is still going on, and the MRAPs are still in Afghanistan, in an all-terrain variant. And not only are insurgents planting bombs in Afghanistan at a higher rate than when Conway worried about the MRAP, the Pentagon’s bomb-trackers frequently warn that the bombs have proliferated far, far beyond the war zones.

All that reasonableness seemed unreasonable to Robert Gates. When Gates came to the Pentagon in 2006 as defense secretary — describing his priorities as “Iraq, Iraq and Iraq” — he was alarmed to see that the Pentagon considered the MRAP just one of a number of programs the bureaucrats were intent on buying.

So Gates did an end-run around the bureaucracy. He called the MRAP his number-one purchasing priority, established a special office called the MRAP Task Force, and took extraordinary bureaucratic steps to move them from the assembly line to Baghdad. “Everything changed” after Gates came to the Pentagon, Biden reminisced: At the height of MRAP production, the military was sending 1000 trucks a month to Iraq. By 2011, when Gates left office, there were over 27,000 MRAPs at work in Iraq and Afghanistan. The military credits the trucks with keeping thousands of troops from being blown up. Gates credited the USA Today that picked up on Danger Room’s MRAP scoop with awakening him to the scale of the problem.

But even then, the MRAP didn’t have an easy path to acceptance — and the Pentagon punished its advocates. Franz Gayl, a civilian scientist inside the Marine Corps, warned legislators and reporters that the Corps dragged its feet on buying the vehicles. Biden, then a Delaware senator, wrote to Conway in 2007 warning that Gayl faced “adverse personnel action against him by his superiors,” action that should “bring dishonor” to the Corps. It wasn’t enough. In 2010, the Marines stripped him of his security clearance, effectively sending his career into deep freeze, for a minor infraction. (Gayl didn’t return Danger Room’s requests for comment.)

Not everyone agrees the MRAP program was a success. Two professors recently called the MRAP a “boondoggle” in Foreign Affairs, writing that the trucks “did not save more lives than medium armored vehicles did, despite their cost of $600,000 apiece.” Yet they didn’t disclose the sensitive Pentagon data they relied upon for reaching that conclusion, making it impossible to independently verify. For what it’s worth, the Pentagon sticks by its assessment of the MRAP as a lifesaver.

And to some degree, the spirit of the Pentagon’s initial objections to the vehicle showed up at the MRAP party in the Pentagon auditorium. The war in Afghanistan grinds on, but Monday’s ceremony announced that a joint emergency purchasing effort for the vehicles in the Army and Marines has come to an end. From now on, each of the services will have to purchase its own MRAPs, something Carter called merely the “next phase” of the program. But the Army, for instance, is already looking beyond MRAPs to its next-gen Joint Light Tactical Vehicle and Ground Combat Vehicle. Emergency apparently over, it’s now time for the military to figure out what to do with all its MRAPs — the very concern that made bureaucrats wary of buying them. Biden noted that had Gates not circumvented the bureaucracy, the first MRAPs would just be arriving in Iraq today — after U.S. troops departed.

Gates didn’t attend the Pentagon event. But while the ceremony congratulated the bureaucracy for embracing the MRAP, Gates sent a letter, addressed specifically to those who worked on the MRAP Task Force. “Unlike many in the Department of Defense,” Gates wrote, “your work truly saved the lives and limbs” of U.S. troops. That line received nervous laughter. But it didn’t stop the Pentagon’s self-congratulation.

buglerbilly
08-10-12, 10:22 PM
British Foxhound benefitting from Spectra Shield

08 October 2012 - 15:37 by the Shephard News Team



Honeywell has announced that its second-generation Spectra Shield ballistic material is being used to armour Foxhound vehicles being manufactured by General Dynamics Land Systems – Force Protection Europe for the British Armed Forces. The lightweight material allows the vehicles it is fitted on to remain agile while increasing survivability.

According to the company, the Foxhound vehicle with Honeywell’s Spectra Shield materials underwent more than 12 months of rigorous blast and mobility testing before being chosen by the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD). The vehicles are currently being shipped for use in Afghanistan.

More than 50% lighter than traditional vehicle armour materials, according to the company, Spectra Shield materials make the vehicles easier to transport and manoeuvre. The protective qualities of Spectra Shield help the Foxhound significantly improve protection of personnel against roadside bombs and improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Honeywell’s patented Spectra Shield products are manufactured by bonding parallel strands of fibre in place with an advanced resin system. In addition to Spectra fibre, Honeywell adapts this technology to other fibres. Spectra fibre is made from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene using a patented gel-spinning process. The fibre exhibits high resistance to chemicals, water, and ultraviolet light. It has excellent vibration damping, flex fatigue and internal fibre-friction characteristics. It also has up to 60 percent greater specific strength than aramid fibre.

Tim Swinger, global business manager of Honeywell’s Advanced Fibers and Composites business, said: ‘Honeywell Spectra Shield lowers the overall vehicle weight of the Foxhound while improving the vehicle’s ability to withstand the increased threats seen in combat today. The decrease in weight helps to decrease each vehicle’s maintenance and fuel costs, and can limit the number of re-supply trips through dangerous routes.’

buglerbilly
18-10-12, 02:51 PM
Oshkosh hits significant vehicle delivery milestone

18 October 2012 - 10:51 by the Shephard News Team



Oshkosh Defense has announced that it has reached a significant milestone for its military vehicle manufacturing line, with the 100,000th vehicle completed on 17 October. The vehicle is part of the first delivery of MRAP All-Terrain Vehicles (M-ATVs) to the United Arab Emirates.

The M-ATV has been a successful programme for the company, with more than 9,500 M-ATVs worldwide orders placed to date. Oshkosh also produces the US Army and US Marine Corps’ heavy and medium vehicles fleets and has developed multiple light vehicle offerings.

John Urias, Oshkosh Corporation executive vice president and president of Oshkosh Defense, said: ‘The founders of Oshkosh Corporation built the company’s first vehicle with patented four-wheel-drive technologies more than 95 years ago, so it is only fitting that the 100,000th defense vehicle is an M-ATV with exceptional off-road mobility. This milestone also speaks to our future. Our vehicles are helping military and security organizations around the world by providing new levels of performance, protection and mobility.’

The company has seen other success over the summer, having received a contract for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programme’s Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase. The JLTV aims to replace many of the US military’s aged HMMWVs with a lightweight vehicle that offers greater protection, mobility and transportability.

buglerbilly
19-10-12, 02:42 PM
JLTV Program Moves Into EMD Phase

(Source: US Army; issued Oct. 18, 2012)



WASHINGTON --- The U.S. Army-led Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV program, is beginning a 33-month Engineering and Manufacturing Development phase, also known as EMD.

The EMD phase is designed to test and prepare the next-generation vehicles for a Limited User Test, Capabilities Production Document and Milestone C procurement decision in FY 2015, service officials said.

"The JLTV incorporates a whole new generation of automotive technology," said David Bassett, deputy program executive officer, Combat Support and Combat Services Support, known as PEO CS & CSS.

The Army-Marine Corps JLTV program, designed to develop a new light tactical vehicle engineered with an unprecedented blend of protection, performance and payload capability complete with IED protection, networking capability, and on-board power generation, recently awarded three EMD-phase contracts worth roughly $65 million each to Lockheed Martin, Oshkosh Defense and AM General.

The JLTV program worked with engineers, requirements experts with the Army's Training and Doctrine Command and industry partners during the TD phase to identify and, in some cases, trade-off less crucial requirements in order to lower the per-unit vehicle price to a range of $250,000 and still develop substantial leap-ahead capability. These cost-informed trades, along with the integration of mature technologies, allowed the JLTV program to shorten the EMD phase from 48 to 33 months, JLTV program officials said.

"The JLTV program capitalized on the benefits of competitive prototyping during the TD phase, where the efforts of multiple vendors substantially improved the fidelity of the designs, and increased confidence in operational performance," said Robert Schumitz, deputy program manager.

NEW AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

The JLTV represents the next-generation of automotive technology in a number of key respects, such as the ability to design a light tactical, mobile vehicle with substantial protective ability to defend against IEDs, roadside bombs and other threats, Bassett explained.

"The vehicle is designed from the ground up to be mobile and get you to the fight with a level of underbody protection equivalent to the original MRAP-ATV (Mine Resistant Ambush Protected - All Terrain Vehicle) vehicle standards. Also, the vehicle is being designed with modular armor, so that when the armor is not needed, we can take it off and bring the weight of the vehicle down to drive down the operating costs," Bassett said.

With a curb weight of roughly 14,000 pounds, the JLTV will provide protection comparable to the 25,000-pound M-ATV, thus combining the mobility and transportability of a light vehicle with MRAP-level protection.

"I remember transitioning from the jeep to the Humvee as a young enlisted Soldier, because our needs had changed. Now warfare and our Soldiers’ needs have changed again. By the time we put extra armor on the Humvee to meet today's threats, there wasn't any payload (weight) capacity left. And, while the MRAP had the armor and some payload, it wasn't well equipped to maneuver. The intent with JLTV is to have a vehicle with MRAP-level armor in some places, but also still with payload and maneuverability," said incoming JLTV Joint Program Manager Col. John Cavedo.

When compared with earlier light tactical vehicle models such as the Humvee, the JLTV is being engineered with a much stronger, 250 to 360 Horsepower engine and a 570-amp alternator able to generate up to 10 kilowatts of exportable power. In fact, due to the increase in need for on-board power, the JLTV testing during the EMD phase will include the integration of a suite of C4ISR kits and networking technologies, Bassett explained.

"We expect to see a 10 to 15-percent improvement in fuel economy just by going to a modern fuel-injected, digitally-controlled engine and have a curb weight that still meets Army and Marine Corps mobility requirements," he explained. "The JLTV will be designed with enough on-board power to support the Army's future network and be able to take advantage of the latest generation of diesel engine technology to maximize fuel economy."

The in-vehicle network approach is grounded in "open architecture," meaning that information technology systems and electronics will all be built to commercial technical standards ensuring maximum interoperability. JLTV is aligning with the new VICTORY standards, which will enable a single computer or system to run a host of interoperable applications and functions.

With the JLTV architecture, the vehicle will be able to streamline and more easily exchange and transmit information while ensuring that the maximum number of programs and applications are possible on any given computer or display screen.

EMD PHASE

The first part of the EMD phase will be a build phase wherein industry vendors are given nine months to refine their designs and deliver 22 trucks, complete with corresponding blast hulls and armor coupons to the government, Bassett said.

This will be followed by three months of contractor testing and then a series of formal government tests in key areas such as ballistic and blast testing, reliability and performance assessments, corrosion testing and a series of mobility and transportability evaluations, Bassett explained.

Affordability remains a large part of the calculus regarding the JLTV program, so the Army-Marine Corps program office encourages competition among vendors and expects to maintain a cost-conscious approach. In fact, a competitive procurement model, which will continue to inform the effort through the EMD phase, has greatly helped the maturation of the program thus far, Bassett said.

The JLTV is being built as a single truck in two primary configurations, a four-door platform called the Combat Tactical Vehicle and a two-door platform called a Combat Support Vehicle. The four-door platform will include a Heavy Gun Carrier and Close Combat Weapons Carrier variants designed to carry weapons such as a .50-cal machine gun, TOW missile and conduct mounted patrols and convoy escort missions, among other things. The Combat Tactical Vehicle will be able to carry 3,500 pounds of payload.

All of the JLTVs will be configured with what is called Variable Ride-Height Suspension, described as the ability to raise and lower the suspension to meet certain mission requirements such as the need to raise the suspension in high-threat areas and lower the suspension so that the vehicles can be transported by maritime preposition force ships. Also, the JLTV will be able to sling-load beneath a CH-47 Chinook helicopter under standard conditions, Bassett said.

The goal at the end of the EMD phase will be for the Army-Marine Corps program to down-select a single vendor and move into Low Rate Initial Production, or LRIP, by 2015, Bassett said. The plans call for three years of LRIP, to be followed by five years of full-rate production, resulting in an incremental delivery of the vehicle. The Army plans to acquire roughly 50,000 JLTVs and the Marine Corps plans to procure about 5,500.

-ends-

buglerbilly
23-10-12, 11:50 AM
NGC Unveils MAV-L Ground Mobility Vehicle for US Special Forces Competition



Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) unveiled its offering for the U.S. Special Forces Command Ground Mobility Vehicle 1.1 competition today at the Association of the United States Army conference in Washington, D.C. The Northrop Grumman vehicle is known as the Medium Assault Vehicle – Light (MAV-L).

Northrop Grumman teamed with BAE Systems and Pratt & Miller Engineering for the GMV 1.1 pursuit. The MAV-L is modular, transports up to seven operators, and is air transportable in a MH/CH-47 Chinook helicopter. The vehicle is built specifically for the special operations forces and is designed to function worldwide on any battlefield.

"Our clean-sheet approach and purpose-built solution applies innovation from across our industry team. We deliver an affordable solution that meets the warfighter's mission requirements and a great new capability," said Tom Vice, corporate vice president and president, Northrop Grumman Technical Services. "We're fully committed to providing the Special Operations Command with the most modular and agile vehicle capable of top performance in any operational environment."

BAE Systems is a leader in vehicle design, manufacturing and through-life support of military wheeled vehicles and their associated systems. The company's Sealy, Texas, facility has served as the manufacturing site for tens of thousands of tactical vehicle programs and many survivability and mobility upgrades to various tactical platforms.

Pratt & Miller Engineering is a respected industry leader in the defense, automotive, motorsports and powersports industries. Their work provides clients with innovative, high-performance engineering and manufacturing solutions.

"The capabilities of our partners combined with Northrop Grumman's decades of experience integrating C4ISR systems into land forces sustainment and military platforms, ensure that our customers receive a vehicle as capable and flexible as their mission requirements," said Frank Sturek, deputy director of land forces sustainment and MAV-L program manager, Northrop Grumman.

Source : Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC)

Published on ASDNews: Oct 22, 2012

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-45674/NGC_Unveils_MAV-L_Ground_Mobility_Vehicle_for_US_Special_Forces_Co mpetition.htm#ixzz2A7Nowr00

buglerbilly
23-10-12, 10:20 PM
A bit more on MAV-L.........

AUSA 2012: Northrop Grumman unveils MAV–L

23 October 2012 - 15:41 by Scott Gourley in Washington, DC



AUSA Annual provided the venue for the unveiling of a new Medium Assault Vehicle – Light (MAV-L) high mobility tactical vehicle platform. Developed by an industry team led by Northrop Grumman, the vehicle is one of six candidate platforms being assessed under the ongoing United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV) 1.1 solicitation.

In addition to Northrop Grumman, the MAV-L development team included BAE Systems and Pratt and Miller Engineering.

‘The United States Special Operations Command has a requirement to modernise their ground mobility vehicle,’ explained Frank Sturek, land forces modernisation campaign manager at Northrop Grumman. ‘The command released a request for proposals in April of 2012 and, after a series of market research and industry day conferences two facts stood out about the solicitation. The current GMV for special operations forces does not meet the long range surveillance and airfield seizure mission requirements. The other fact that stood out is that the existing products available on the market also did not meet USSOCOM’s requirements, therefore they put out the request for proposal.’

‘USSOCOM wanted a vehicle that had dimensional and weight characteristics to be internally transported in an MH- or CH-47 rotary wing helicopter,’ he added. ‘USSOCOM wanted a vehicle with high off-road mobility and quick dash speed that leveraged technologies from the off-road racing and high performance racing communities. USSOCOM wanted a vehicle that is ergonomically designed with the operator in mind to fit all of his gear, ammunition, and supplies and allow the special operators to configure the vehicle load how they want to – not how the OEM [original equipment manufacturer] put it together. It had to be modular and still be roomy enough for the larger physical stature of special operations personnel, especially with their personal weapons, body armour, and tactical gear loaded on their bodies.’

‘The MAV-L team, led by Northrop Grumman, stands firmly behind this product offering,’ he said. ‘It’s purpose-built. It’s internally transportable in CH-47 and also in larger fixed-wing aircraft. And it has significant off-road mobility – three times that of the current HMMWV- with 18 inches of wheel travel in front and 20 inches in the back versus the current HMMWV, which has about six inches of suspension wheel travel. It’s multi-mission configurable and utilises kits to meet the different threats and environmental conditions: we have an armor kit, an enclosure kit, an arctic kit. Instead of offering “one size fits all,” we give them options to allow them to configure the vehicle for the mission.’

buglerbilly
24-10-12, 09:37 PM
AUSA 2012: Textron reinvents Commando range

24 October 2012 - 20:50 by Darren Lake in Washington, DC



Textron Marine and Land Systems used AUSA Annual as the venue to unveil their Commando family of vehicles.

The Commando family is based on the company's Armored Security Vehicle (ASV), which is in service with the US Army.

Speaking to Shephard, Richard Valenti, VP business development and capture manager, said that ASV was originally a 'one trick pony' but the company had realised that it could develop the base vehicle to give 'MRAP levels of protection' while maintaining high levels of mobility.

Beyond the baseline Commando Advanced the company can now offer two further variants of the vehicle - the Commando Select which offers MRAP Level 1 blast protection and the Commando Elite which MRAP 2X blast protection. The former has already has been bought by the US to equip Iraqi forces while the latter is the basis for the Canadian Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle programme.

Valenti said that the company is currently delivering three variants of the Commando Select to Iraq - a basic APC, a command and control variant and an ambulance. However, the country is now evaluating whether to add three further variants that would include a maintenance vehicle, an 81mm mortar system and a 90mm direct fire platform.

As well as the 600 Commando Select's being delivered to Iraq the company is also contracted to deliver 500 Commando Elite's to Canada for the TAPV programme with an option for a further 100 vehicles. As well as adding further levels of protection the Elite variant also includes a digital backbone that allows the 'plug and play' of a variety of sensors and other systems.

In the summer Textron participated with the Commando Elite in summer trials in the United Arab Emirates. The country is considering the vehicle as a reconnaissance platform for the Presidential Guard and Valenti said that there could be further requirements in the country.

Looking to the future the company wants to continue improving the Commando offering. Among the improvements that Textron is looking at are further lethality options. However, Valenti said that the company would remain focused on providing the right vehicles at the right cost.

buglerbilly
24-10-12, 10:07 PM
‘FlexFence’ Protects Against Rocket-Propelled Grenades

Posted by admin | October 24th, 2012 | AUSA 2012, homepage


FlexFence, shown on a vehicle, can be tailored.

By Michelle Tan, mtan@militarytimes.com // Plasan’s FlexFence feels like a smooth leather seat, but this new protection system is designed to protect vehicles from the dreaded rocket-propelled grenades.

FlexFence has been in the works for about a year and a half, said David Widerker, North Americamarketing director for Plasan.

Weighing in at about 2 pounds per square foot, FlexFence is lighter than existing RPG protection systems, and it attaches more elegantly and closer to the vehicle’s body, providing better coverage, he said.

The FlexFence also can be tailored to fit any vehicle, and damaged parts, like pieces to a puzzle, can be removed and replaced.

Early tests have shown FlexFence has a 20 percent higher probability of stopping an RPG, Widerker said, and each square meter of the material can sustain up to four shots before becoming vulnerable.

buglerbilly
25-10-12, 01:48 PM
Hawkei On Display At Land Warfare Conference

(Source: Thales; issued October 24, 2012)



Thales Australia will showcase its innovative Hawkei Protected Mobility Vehicle at next week’s Land Warfare Conference in Melbourne – the first time the vehicle has been on unrestricted display in Australia.

The Australian-built Hawkei is tailored to the specific requirements of the Australian Defence Force – a 7-tonne lightweight protected mobility vehicle for rapid CH-47 airmobile deployment, constructed of a modular design with scalable protection systems. Initially the Hawkei will be configured in four variants: command, reconnaissance, liaison and utility.

Enabling operational flexibility across a wide range of mission profiles, the Hawkei delivers a balanced combination of survivability with high levels of protection, mobility and payload. The vehicle features an open electronic architecture that enables customers to integrate systems from a variety of suppliers – an approach that increases adaptability and widens the options for battle management systems and other capabilities. It also features an innovative B-kit armour system that can be installed by troops on operations in less than 30 minutes, without the need for specialist tools.

Thales has demonstrated the benefits in speed of development and delivery through its approach to generating collaborative industry partnerships. The Hawkei has been developed with Plasan, a recognised leader in specialised armour solutions, while Boeing Defence Australia is providing advanced Integrated Logistics Support.

Thales Australia CEO Chris Jenkins said: "The Hawkei is a clear demonstration of the highly effective capabilities that can be delivered to Australian troops by Australian industry. It’s a testament to the benefits of having a deep industrial base that can develop, design, manufacture and support local platforms for local needs.

"The work carried out at our Bendigo facility in Victoria supports hundreds of jobs. The Bushmaster supply chain comprises approximately 120 Australian Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), with around 60% in Victoria. With this solid base, the Hawkei clearly demonstrates that Australian industry is well-placed to meet the current and future needs of the ADF. Beyond this, the Hawkei offers great potential for future exports from the Australian defence industry.

"We welcome the support many different organisations have given this vehicle, from the Department of Defence and the Victorian state government to the industry associations and the industrial base itself. We are continuing to develop the Hawkei, and will next deliver more capable versions to the Defence Materiel Organisation later this year and into 2013."

Thales Australia is currently under contract with the Department of Defence to deliver six Hawkeis under the LAND 121 Phase 4 program, which will ultimately acquire 1,300 new light protected vehicles to replace selected elements of the Land Rover fleet.

Thales will be showcasing the Hawkei at next week’s Land Warfare Conference exhibition in Melbourne. Two media briefings will be held on the Thales stand – the first in conjunction with the Victorian State Government at 10.30am on Wednesday October 31, followed by a more detailed briefing on the vehicle’s capabilities at 2.30pm on Thursday November 1.

Thales is a global technology leader for the Defence & Security and the Aerospace & Transport markets. In 2011, the company generated revenues of €13 billion (equivalent of AUD 17.5 billion) with 67,000 employees in 56 countries. With its 22,500 engineers and researchers, Thales has a unique capability to design, develop and deploy equipment, systems and services that meet the most complex security requirements. Thales has an exceptional international footprint, with operations around the world working with customers and local partners.

Thales Australia is a trusted partner of the Australian Defence Force and is also present in commercial sectors ranging from air traffic management to security systems and services. Employing around 3,300 people in over 35 sites across the country, Thales Australia recorded revenues of more than AUD 962 million in 2011.



-ends-

buglerbilly
31-10-12, 12:12 PM
Textron and Rheinmetall Canada Announce $205 M Contract on Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Vehicle Program



Textron Systems Canada Inc., a Textron Inc. (NYSE: TXT) company, and Rheinmetall Canada Inc., today announced a $205 million CAD contract for work to be performed by Rheinmetall Canada on the Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) project.

Rheinmetall Canada will earn $152 million CAD during the TAPV program's production phase - performing critical engineering, and production work at its facility in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec. The contract includes $53 million CAD Rheinmetall Canada will earn developing Integrated Logistics Support (ILS) products and as the primary in-service support hub for the vehicle fleet during its service life. It also fulfills a portion of Textron's participation in Canada’s Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) Policy arising from the government's purchase of 500 Textron TAPVs.

During the production phase of the TAPV fleet, Rheinmetall will perform the critical final assembly and test of the vehicles. Rheinmetall will also integrate essential sub-systems such as the Remotely Controlled Weapon Station, the Vehicle Navigation System and the Driver Vision Enhancement System. The production phase of the acquisition contract is expected to span from July 2014 to March 2016.

Once fielded, Rheinmetall will provide In-Service Support (ISS) for the entire TAPV fleet, also at its facility in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec. ISS will start with Initial Operational Capability when the first 47 vehicles are delivered, planned for 2014, and is expected to end in 2021, five years after the last vehicle is delivered.

"This partnership with Textron Systems is of strategic importance to Rheinmetall Canada," said Rheinmetall Canada’s President and CEO, Dr. Andreas Knackstedt. "We are extremely pleased to work with Textron Systems delivering state of the art equipment to the Army, and value for taxpayers' money, while creating highly skilled jobs in Canada."

In June 2012, the Textron TAPV Team, led by Textron Systems Canada, was selected to manufacture 500 Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) with options for up to 100 more. The TAPV contract has a value of $603.4 million CAD, with an additional five-year in-service support contract of $105.4 million CAD.

Ottawa-based Textron Systems Canada, as prime contractor, will provide overall TAPV program and configuration management, act as design authority for change management, coordinate vehicle integration activities by Canadian subcontractors, and manage the In-Service Support contract. Textron Systems Canada will also be implementing a pan-Canadian Industrial and Regional Benefits program designed to bring new expertise and opportunities to Canadian companies.

"Rheinmetall Canada is a key TAPV teammate and will remain so as we deliver the TAPV and related economic benefits to Canada," said Neil Rutter, general manager of Textron Systems Canada. "In the coming months, we will be signing many more agreements with other best-in-class Canadian suppliers who will help us deliver a fleet of Textron TAPVs that will provide Canadian soldiers with unmatched performance and protection for decades."

The Canadian Textron TAPV team also includes Kongsberg Protech Systems Canada (London, ON) and EODC - Engineering Office Deisenroth Canada (Ottawa, ON). As the program is ramped up, many other Canadian companies are expected to figure prominently in the Textron TAPV supply chain.

The Textron TAPV is the most reliable and technologically advanced vehicle of its kind. It draws on the company’s more than 45 years of experience in the design and production of armoured vehicles. The Textron TAPV will provide the Canadian Forces with the optimal balance of survivability, mobility and versatility, while delivering outstanding performance in the world’s most challenging environments. Extensively tested to confirm ballistic, blast, mobility and reliability levels, the Textron TAPV has been engineered to meet and exceed Canada's requirements.

Source : Textron Inc. (NYSE: TXT)

Published on ASDNews: Oct 31, 2012

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-45883/Textron_and_Rheinmetall_Canada_Announce_$205_M_Con tract_on_Canadian_Forces_Tactical_Armoured_Vehicle _Program.htm#ixzz2AsFkUYbm

buglerbilly
31-10-12, 11:33 PM
U.S. Army Initiates New Round of Humvee Modernization

Oct. 31, 2012 - 03:14PM

By PAUL McLEARY

The U.S. Army kicked off the next chapter in its attempt to modernize its Humvee fleet when the service issued a request for proposals Oct. 29 to find out what survivability and crew protection enhancements industry has to offer.

While previous efforts aimed at upgrading as many as 60,000 vehicles from top to bottom, the most recent document outlines a series of extremely limited goals focused on vehicle survivability by “making systematic improvements … through increased crew protection and vehicle survivability at a maximum Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of 18,500 lbs.” according to the solicitation.

The RfP for what has been dubbed the Modernized Expanded Capacity Vehicle — Survivability (MECV-S), is only the first of what Col. David Bassett, the Army’s deputy program executive officer for combat support and combat service support, described as a multistep process to revamp the Humvee fleet for potential future operations.

“We wanted to make sure that we could at least get good test results on all of the survivability improvements that industry had developed in anticipation of the original MECV program,” Bassett told reporters at the recent Association of the United States Army meeting in Washington. “So we set aside a portion of the fiscal year ’12 funding to evaluate, model and test those survivability solutions so at least we understand” what is out there.

The Humvee modernization program has had a curious history. At one point, the Army wanted to recap up to 60,000 Humvees, and in late 2011 it looked like the program might overtake the Army’s developmental Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) competition, whose cost and schedule were coming under fire from some members of Congress. But a revamping of JLTV requirements to reduce weight and cost led the program to receive full funding in the fiscal 2013 budget, and on Aug. 22, three engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) contracts were awarded to AM General, Lockheed Martin, and Oshkosh for the 27-month EMD effort.

The same budget scuttled the Humvee modernization program (the original MECV), much to the displeasure of some in Congress.

But thanks to budget wrangling on Capitol Hill, the Army now has $48 million in R&D dollars to fund future MECV-related activities. While the Army earlier this year sought to transfer $28 million of that to other programs, the House Appropriations defense subcommittee refused to go along with that plan, and now the Army has to spend that money by the end of fiscal 2013 or lose it, according to budget rules.

According to the latest RfP, $19.8 million of that cash will pay for up to six contracts for the MECV-S program, with each contract calling for two identical MECV-S systems as well as two sets of computer aided design models. The RfP defines an MECV-S system as “an armored 4-door weapons carrier crew compartment on a rolling chassis.”

By separating the protection and survivability aspect of the program from the automotive aspect, “it allowed us to spend more of that money in a way that we thought was very responsible,” Bassett said. “If we were to try and add additional funds, we put this entire effort in jeopardy because we simply don’t have the dollars and the years” to do it.

buglerbilly
01-11-12, 12:10 AM
Lockheed Plays Against Type, Offers High Tech, Low Cost JLTV

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

Published: October 31, 2012

Video here: http://defense.aol.com/2012/10/31/lockheed-plays-against-type-offers-high-tech-low-cost-jltv/

AUSA: Last month's Association of the US Army conference in Washington was a chance for contractors to show off their biggest programs, and they don't get much bigger than the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, a $15 billion-plus program to replace the Humvee.

But for one of the three companies competing to build the JLTV, the program is in fact relatively small. That would be Lockheed Martin, the world's largest defense contractor, best known for high-tech and high-cost programs like spy satellites, the F-22 Raptor, and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Lockheed does work on some ground vehicles, and its JLTV partner BAE builds even more, but they're hardly central to Lockheed's business.

"It's a big deal," insisted the head of Lockheed's JLTV program, Kathryn Hasse, in an interview at AUSA. "We are absolutely committed to the JLTV," she told AOL Defense, and Lockheed has invested millions of its own money in development, although she wouldn't specify how much.

Lockheed's approach is considered the most high-tech of the three contestants', with rivals Oshkosh and AM General building instead on the strength of their existing military trucks, the M-ATV and Humvee respectively. "We've taken a very different approach to Oshkosh and AM General," Hasse said. "We started with a white sheet of paper."

That fresh start gives Lockheed more room to innovate, but it makes it harder to control costs -- not a Lockheed strong point on the F-22 or F-35. Hasse insists the company can meet the military's $250,000 per vehicle cost cap. In fact, she said, the Lockheed-BAE team has already moved away from the boutique production typical for prototypes and built two JLTVs on a full-speed production line, the former Stewart & Stevenson factory in Sealy, Texas. It's in Sealy that the Lockheed JLTVs will be mass-produced -- if the aerospace giant gets the contract.

buglerbilly
08-11-12, 01:34 PM
1st Armoured SISU 8x8 military truck delivery to Estonia



Sisu Defence Oy has delivered the first Armoured SISU 8x8 military truck for Estonian Forces. The delivery was received by the Estonian Air Force in the beginning of November 2012.

The truck delivery is part of Ground Master air surveillance system supplied by French Thales-Raytheon Systems Company to Estonian Ministry of Defence. In the air surveillance system, the Armoured SISU 8x8 trucks serve as Radar Carrier Vehicles. SISU 8x8 Radar Carrier Vehicle has an integrated hydraulic stabilizer system with automatic control that brings the radar in level position also when the vehicle stands on inclined or uneven surface.

In the Ground Master air surveillance system there is also SISU 4x4 trucks that serve as Ancillary Vehicles.

The Ground Master radars are a range of versatile air defense radars dedicated to the protection of key assets and expeditionary forces. These systems are specifically designed to deliver high detection performance, high track accuracy suitable for weapon assignment, high operational availability and simplified maintenance as well as high mobility. They are able to detect a vast array of modern threats, including UAVs, missiles, mortars and rockets, from very low to very high altitude (Source: ThalesRaytheonSystems).

SISU 8x8 Radar Carrier Vehicles belong to the series of Armoured SISU Military Trucks already in service also with Lithuanian, and with Finnish Forces.

The versatile SISU 8x8 military trucks are currently in service, for example, as radar carrier vehicles, missile launcher vehicles, fire fighting vehicles, cargo transporters and recovery vehicles. At the moment, these Armoured Trucks are fielded in UN and NATO led operations in Lebanon, and in Afghanistan.

Source : Sisu Defence Oy

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-46051/1st_Armoured_SISU_8x8_military_truck_delivery_to_E stonia.htm#ixzz2BdbcWaYa

buglerbilly
19-11-12, 08:41 PM
Humvee Maker AM General Plays Underdog In JLTV Battle

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

Published: November 19, 2012



AM General's corporate ancestors built jeeps in World War II. The company designed and still builds the military's iconic Humvee. But in the battle to build the Humvee's replacement, the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, AM General is ironically not the incumbent but the scrappy underdog.

AM General's JLTV proposal, the BRV-O (Blast-Resistant Vehicle - Offroad), is the underdog in the competition to replace the company's iconic Humvee.

AM General's BRV-O (Blast-Resistant Vehicle - Offroad) is the underdog contender for the JLTV competition to replace the company's iconic Humvee.



Here's AM General's image problem: The Humvee is still iconic -- but not in a good way. In the 1990s, after the victory of Desert Storm, the High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV, pronounced "Humvee") became such a symbol of American military might that Arnold Schwarzenegger bought one to drive, jump-starting a fad. After 2003, however, the emblematic image of a Humvee became one of twisted wreckage, blown apart by a roadside bomb.

The military scrambled to uparmor its Humvees, layering on more and more protection until the chassis could take no more. At that point it switched to the much heavier, and much less maneuverable, Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected (MRAP) trucks. But AM General does not make MRAPs.

The latest, lightest, most nimble version of the MRAP, the MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV), is the closest thing in current service to what the Army and Marine Corps want in the JLTV. So it's the M-ATV's maker, Oshkosh, that is the closest thing to an incumbent in the current competition.

Oshkosh, incidentally, is a major maker of both civilian and military trucks with over 13,000 employees. The third JLTV competitor, Lockheed Martin, has relatively little track record in ground vehicles but is the world's largest defense company, employing a staggering 120,000 people worldwide. AM General's workforce? "Approximately 2,000."

So here's AM General's two-part challenge on JLTV: first, compete on equal terms with much larger, better-resourced firms; second, convince the military that their entry, the BRV-O (Blast-Resistant Vehicle - Offroad) builds on the best parts of their Humvee heritage where it can -- especially automotive design -- but departs from the past where it must -- in protection.

"The base structure is different between the two systems," AM General Vice President Chris Vanslager emphasized in an interview with AOL Defense. "The JLTV has a different mission profile, different requirements."

The Humvee was designed for Cold War battlefronts in Germany and Korea, where the US military expected a conventional clash with clear front lines. Heavy tanks and dug-in infantry would hold the line while light trucks like the Humvee would scurry around in the rear. At most, the Humvee needed to be protected against small-arms fire from enemy scouts. If there were any mines, they'd be the ones our own forces laid to stop the advancing Communists. Then came the guerrilla wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, where the main threat was the homemade landmines called IEDs -- improvised explosive devices -- exploding upwards from below.

"The threats initially were just the direct fire threats from 360 degrees around the vehicle and from the roof," Vanslager said. "The threats evolved into a blast under the vehicle."

The Humvee is designed like a conventional civilian car or truck, with armor added almost as an afterthought. The floor and seats are supported by the vehicle's metal frame -- which transmits the shock from a blast beneath the truck right through the chassis into the occupants.

Not so with JLTV. AM General -- like its competitors -- has designed their JLTV contender from the ground up, literally, to take a mine blast and survive. The crew are inside a kind of armored "capsule," their seats suspended from the ceiling, with a "floating floor" between them and the blast. Every feature of these vehicles, not just the external armor but the internal structure itself, is designed to channel explosive energy away from the crew.

"Our vehicle as a system is designed to protect the occupants," Vansleger said. "It doesn't just start with the armor that is on the vehicle, it goes down inside all the way to the seats and the restraint systems."

So on protection, AM General argues, their JLTV is on a par with the competitors. On automative performance, reliability, and ease of maintenance, they say, it's got the edge -- the upside of the 43-year heritage of the Humvee.

AM General has built "300,000 light tactical vehicles in this class size," Vanslager said. "For the last 10 years we've invested over a $100 million dollars on new technology" -- that's $100 million of the company's own money, not federal contract dollars -- "on automative improvements, advanced automative technologies, as well as survivability."

AM General, for example, builds the engine for their JLTV, out of their wholly owned subsidiary, General Engine Products. By contrast, even though Oshkosh is a major truck manufacturer, it doesn't build its own engines: Its JLTV contender runs on a Duramax from General Motors. Lockheed's JLTV has a Cummins engine and, for that matter, is largely built by BAE's Seely, Texas plant (formerly Stewart & Stevenson), with Lockheed providing electronics and acting as the "integrator" of its teammates' contributions. Outsourcing a component, even one as central as an engine, is not a disability in this age of multi-company teams, but the fact that AM General builds their engine in-house certainly sets them apart.

While AM General emphasizes their JLTV is an all-new design, they also reused proven Humvee components whever they could. The exact count depends on whether you consider a transmission, for example, to a single "part" or several, but Vanslegger says about 40 percent of the parts on their JLTV are ones already in the military supply system. And AM General's 21 JLTV prototypes to be delivered to the government for testing are being built just outside South Bend, Ind. on the company's existing Humvee production line.

"Don't think it's a disadvantage that we have this legacy of Humvee," said Vanslager. "We're the light tactical [vehicle] guys.... We've been doing it for fifty-plus years."

buglerbilly
23-11-12, 01:33 PM
£50m Contract for 50 New Foxhounds

(Source: British Forces News; published Nov. 23, 2012)



The Ministry of Defence is set to announce a £50 million contract for 50 new Foxhound light patrol vehicles in Afghanistan. Defence Minister Philip Dunne is expected to confirm details of the new contract this afternoon during a visit to the British company that makes the vehicles - General Dynamics: Force Protection (GD:FP) Spares Facility in Telford, Shropshire.

The Foxhound, introduced to offer unprecedented levels of blast protection, replaced the Army's Snatch Land Rover, which proved highly vulnerable to roadside bombs used by insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The Foxhound has enhancements including a V-shaped hull to give protection against the bombs which have been a common tactic of Taliban fighters in Afghanistan. The Army's most agile protected vehicle, it uses cutting-edge Formula 1 technology to provide unparalleled protection for its weight and class. It can reach speeds of up to 80mph and drive away from an IED) strike on just three wheels, while its engine is so advanced it can be changed in 30 minutes and put back on the road.

The first Foxhounds were deployed to Afghanistan earlier this year and are now being used by soldiers who are mentoring and partnering with the Afghan National Security Force. Today's announcement is part of an overall investment of more than £300 million by the MOD for Foxhounds since 2010, and will bring the fleet to more than 370 vehicles, to be used in Afghanistan as well as in future operations.

Speaking in September, when Foxhound was first operational in Afghanistan, chief of staff for the Bastion Force Protection Wing Squadron Leader Jim Stewart, said: "Foxhound is an enormous leap forward in capability; the off-road mobility, enhanced protection and night-vision systems that it offers to the troops on the ground are unmatched in a vehicle of this size."

-ends-

buglerbilly
23-11-12, 09:39 PM
U.K. To Buy 51 Foxhounds for Army

Nov. 23, 2012 - 10:35AM

By ANDREW CHUTER



Slowly creeping up to the 400-vehicle figure they wanted to start with.................

LONDON — The British Army is to get an additional 51 Foxhound light protected patrol vehicles following a 46 million pound deal between the Ministry of Defence and platform builder General Dynamics Force Protection.

Funds for the procurement were made available from a significant underspend in the MoD’s equipment program for the 2012-2013 financial year.

The latest purchase brings total MoD investment in Foxhound to 340 million pounds since the contract to buy the first tranche of vehicles was signed in 2010. The deal brings the Foxhound fleet to 376 vehicles. The latest procurement follows a deal to purchase 25 vehicles in midyear.

Foxhound entered service in Afghanistan in June.

buglerbilly
23-11-12, 10:09 PM
Fifty-one new Foxhound vehicles for the front line

An Equipment and Logistics news article

23 Nov 12

The MOD is investing £46m in acquiring fifty-one new Foxhound patrol vehicles for soldiers serving on the front line in Afghanistan.


A Foxhound light protected patrol vehicle at Camp Bastion in Afghanistan
[Picture: Graeme Main, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology Philip Dunne made the announcement during a visit to the General Dynamics Land Systems - Force Protection Europe (GDLS-FPE) facility in Telford, which provides spares for the Foxhound vehicle.

The contract announced today is part of an overall investment of £340m that the MOD has made in Foxhound since 2010.

This is helping to sustain jobs at the Telford facility, GDLS-FPE's HQ in Leamington Spa, and across the UK in the Foxhound supply chain.

Designed and built by GDLS - FPE in Britain, Foxhound is one of the Army's most agile protected vehicles. It uses leading-edge Formula 1 technology to provide unparalleled protection for its weight and class.

The first Foxhounds were deployed to Afghanistan in June 2012 and are now being used by soldiers operating in mentoring and partnering roles with the Afghan National Security Forces.

During the visit to the spares facility, Mr Dunne and Major Chris Thoms, the requirements manager for protected mobility at the MOD, met with staff who are also providing vital logistical support to the Army in Afghanistan.


A Foxhound light protected patrol vehicle in Afghanistan (library image)
[Picture: Sergeant Andy Reddy, Crown Copyright/MOD 2012]

Mr Dunne said:

"I was pleased to meet with employees at General Dynamics - Force Protection who have helped make Foxhound a real procurement success story, taking only 40 months to develop it from the initial design to deployment in Afghanistan.

"The work being done by staff here in Telford is ensuring the vehicles can stay on the road and helping our soldiers do the vital job of engaging with Afghan forces and protecting the local population.

"Balancing the MOD's budget means we can now confidently invest in equipment like Foxhound, which has the flexibility and adaptability to operate in a wide variety of environments, providing capability for the Army well into the future.

"This investment shows the MOD playing its part in delivering growth and sustaining jobs in the West Midlands industrial base."

Speaking in September when Foxhound was first operational in Afghanistan, Chief of Staff for the Bastion Force Protection Wing, Squadron Leader Jim Stewart, said:

"Foxhound is an enormous leap forward in capability; the off-road mobility, enhanced protection and night-vision systems that it offers to the troops on the ground are unmatched in a vehicle of this size."

buglerbilly
30-11-12, 01:38 PM
BAE Works with Army Depot to Reset Wheeled Military Vehicles

BAE Systems is building upon its' solid relationship with the Letterkenny Army Depot in a vehicle reset effort for the Medium Mine Protected Vehicle (MMPV)



BAE Systems received a $37.6 million contract from the Letterkenny Army Depot to provide spare parts and kits for 250 Medium Mine Protected Vehicles, a 6x6 state-of-the-art wheeled military vehicle.

“Over the past several years, we have worked closely with the Letterkenny Army Depot on a variety of programs for our U.S. military,” said Robert Houston, vice president and deputy general manager of Weapon Systems and Support at BAE Systems. “Our partnership on the MMPV program will not only increase the capabilities of the vehicle, but also help to strengthen our partnership with the Letterkenny Army Depot.”

The MMPV has a V-shaped hull that provides superior blast protection against symmetrical, asymmetrical and unconventional explosives hazards. The wheeled vehicle also has a large modular interior, high mobility chassis and extensive equipment options and is an ideal platform for any mission in an explosive hazard environment. Soldier-friendly features include large ballistic windows, a 360-degree situational awareness suite and a rear ramp for the deployment of remotely operated unmanned ground vehicles for use in route and area clearance missions.

The spare parts and kits will be assembled by the existing workforce at the BAE Systems facility in Anniston, Alabama.

Source : BAE Systems PLC (LSE: BAES.L)

Published on ASDNews: Nov 30, 2012

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-46435/BAE_Works_with_Army_Depot_to_Reset_Wheeled_Militar y_Vehicles.htm#ixzz2DiGAKBmU

buglerbilly
07-12-12, 11:23 PM
December 7, 2012 at 14:55

Industry Team Offers MAV-L for Special Applications Beyond SOCOM

Posted by Tamir Eshel


MAV-L was designed with a ‘clean sheet approach’ to meet special operations requirements. Photo: Northrop grumman

Northrop Grumman, BAE Systems and Pratt & Miller Engineering team celebrated the debut of the MAV-L at AUSA 2012, the team’s entry into the GMV 1.1 pursuit. MAV-L is a modular vehicle, built to transports up to seven operators and easily reconfigured to fit specific missions.

Despite its spacious size it can be air transportable internally in MH/CH-47 Chinook helicopters, thanks to height compression technique reducing the vehicle’s height to fit the Chinook’s cabin. Motor racing specialist company Pratt & Miller Engineering is signed on the unique design, brought from idea to fully functional prototype in few months. A respected industry leader in the defense, automotive, motorsports and powersports industries, Pratt & Miller is renown for their innovative, high-performance engineering and manufacturing solutions.


A top view of the new MAV-L custom designed special operations vehicle. Photo: Northrop Grumman

“Our clean-sheet approach and purpose-built solution applies innovation from across our industry team. We deliver an affordable solution that meets the warfighter’s mission requirements and a great new capability,” said Tom Vice, corporate vice president and president, Northrop Grumman Technical Services. “We’re fully committed to providing the Special Operations Command with the most modular and agile vehicle capable of top performance in any operational environment.” While MAV-L was designed to meet SOCOM GMV 1.1 requirements, the team considered it has applications beyond SOCOM. For example, such vehicles could be suitable for US Army and Marine Corps recon teams, forced entry teams operated by the Air Force, or for international customers. designing the vehicle for maximum adaptation and ample growth.

BAE Systems provides the experience of military vehicle manufacturing, and sustainment for the program. If MAV-L is selected, it will be produced at the company’s Sealy, Texas, facility where MRAPs and tactical trucks where produced in recent years.

“The capabilities of our partners combined with Northrop Grumman’s decades of experience integrating C4ISR systems into land forces sustainment and military platforms, ensure that our customers receive a vehicle as capable and flexible as their mission requirements,” said Frank Sturek, deputy director of land forces sustainment and MAV-L program manager, Northrop Grumman.



Published on 26 Oct 2012

MAV-L
Built for the warfighter.

Northrop Grumman has partnered with
BAE Systems and Pratt & Miller Engineering
to make our latest innovation a reality:
the MAV-L. The MAV-L is another example of
industry leaders joining forces to establish
innovative technology and tools for the warfighter.

buglerbilly
13-12-12, 01:36 PM
Newest Hawkei Prototype Delivered

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued December 13, 2012)

Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today congratulated Thales Australia on the delivery of the latest Hawkei vehicle and trailer prototypes.

This prototype is the first to be delivered under Stage 2 of Project LAND 121 Phase 4.

Made by Thales Australia, the Hawkei was selected in December 2011 as the preferred vehicle for development and testing under the Manufactured and Supported in Australia option of Project LAND 121 Phase 4.

Mr Clare said the Hawkei protected mobility vehicle combines speed with safety for Australian soldiers on the battlefield.

“This year the Government allocated $38 million for further development and testing of the Hawkei,” Mr Clare said.

“Under this agreement Thales will supply six prototype Hawkei vehicles and one trailer for testing and evaluation.”

The delivery of the Hawkei prototype vehicle and trailer is an important milestone for Project LAND 121 Phase 4.

“The Hawkei was manufactured at Thales’s Bendigo facility, which has been producing Bushmasters since 2003,” Mr Clare said.

“The team of 50 working on the Hawkei are part of a team of 210 here at Bendigo. They do a very important job. The work done here in Bendigo is saving lives in Afghanistan.”

The remaining five Hawkei vehicle prototypes are expected to be delivered by June 2013.

Over the next year these vehicles will undergo an extensive testing program, including communication system integration testing, reliability growth trials, survivability testing and user assessments.

Project LAND 121 Phase 4 is a $1.5 billion project that seeks to provide up to 1,300 protected and unprotected light vehicles.

New Special Operations Vehicle Prototype Delivered

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued December 13, 2012)

Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today congratulated Supacat on the delivery of the prototype for a new Special Operations Vehicle. Mr Clare also officially opened Supacat’s new facility in Melbourne.

Supacat was selected earlier this year to develop a prototype vehicle for the Special Operations Vehicle – Direct Action (SOV-DA) requirement under Project JP2097 Phase 1B. The prototype will be used to inform capability options for Second Pass project approval by the Government.

The SOV-DA will contribute to the overall land mobility capability for Special Forces. It can carry a range of weapons systems, communications and surveillance equipment.

Supacat has previously supplied a number of Special Operations Vehicles – Special Reconnaissance (SOV-SR) to Special Operations Command (SOCOMD).

These vehicles are named the ‘Nary’, in honour of Warrant Officer Class Two David Nary, an Australian Special Forces soldier who died during a training operation in the Middle East in 2005.

The SOV-DA will provide a different capability effect for SOCOMD, to that provided by the SOV-SR. It has a range of unique features including improved rollover protection, a remote weapon station, an ability to carry a Javelin Anti-Tank missile system, improved self-recovery capability and it can be carried underslung by a CH-47 Chinook.

“Supacat’s vehicles are used by the Australian Army and other land forces around the world,” Mr Clare said.

“Australia will be the first country outside the United Kingdom where Supacat provides complete in-country support. Its establishment here in Melbourne shows the strength of our local industry.

“The Supacat facility employs 18 staff, whose jobs range from design, analysis and systems engineers as well as project management and support personnel, for the existing fleet and prototype evaluation for these important vehicles.”

To deliver the Special Operations Vehicle, Supacat formed “Supacat Team Australia”, which is a partnership involving 15 Australian companies, including Broens, Marand, Haulmark and Tectonica.

Supacat vehicles are also used by United Kingdom, United States and Danish Special Forces, as well as the UK Army.

-ends-

buglerbilly
14-12-12, 11:46 PM
Supacat delivers REDFIN 1B prototype to ADF

14 December 2012 - 15:13 by the Shephard News Team



Supacat has announced that it has delivered a prototype of its new special operations vehicle to the Australian Defence Force (ADF) for the Special Operations Vehicle element of the Australian Defence Material Organisation (DMO)’s JP2097 Ph 1B (REDFIN) programme.

The Supacat team was selected in April 2012 as preferred bidder to provide a prototype vehicle for the Special programme. The DMO will use the prototype during the evaluation phase in support of the options that will be provided to government at second pass.

The vehicle is the latest version of Supacat’s Special Forces HMT Extenda. The new vehicle retains a high level of commonality with the Australian Army’s existing Nary HMT fleet, delivered by Supacat in 2009, but provides improved capabilities, particularly in crew protection and vehicle versatility.

Michael Halloran, managing director of Supacat, said: ‘With our partners and Elbit Systems of Australia, we are delighted to have delivered this initial phase of the REDFIN 1B programme. We have worked closely with the customer and our joint commitment has enabled us to achieve this on time and to budget.

‘Supacat's REDFIN 1B solution offers capability improvements in the key areas of firepower, protection, capacity, operability and safety, based upon direct feedback from the worldwide operational use of existing HMT fleets. There are also a number of additional options offered that the ADF may wish to choose.’

Supacat’s HMT combines high levels of mobility, protection, payload and firepower. Designed for use by Special Forces, the HMT Extenda is convertible to either a 4x4 or 6x6 configuration to meet different operational requirements by inserting or removing a self-contained third axle unit. Like other HMT series platforms, the HMT Extenda can be supplied with optional mine blast and ballistic protection kits and with a variety of mission hampers, weapons, communications, ISTAR and force protection equipment to suit a wide range of operational roles.

JKM Mk2
15-12-12, 11:13 AM
I have a couple of questions that may seem rather bumb, but..........

Is the Foxhound roughly the equivalent of the Hawkei?

Why do SPECOPs vehicles always seem to be so 'open'? There is no protection what-so-ever on any of them.

Cheers
JKM

buglerbilly
16-12-12, 01:30 AM
Roughly speaking, yes they are equivalent, both are in the 7-10 tonnes region unloaded/loaded..........

SpecOps vehicles are open so that: -

1) They can be carried by underslung as Chinook cargo in particular due to reduced weight, and

2) so that the crew has maximum situational awareness in all conditions, eyes out, if you like.

Truth is, the open design is still the best for Recon but Remote Weapon Systems carried by Hawkei and Foxhound (when fitted to either) also expand the Overwatch & Recon capabilities two/three fold (?) due to far longer range EO gear.

JKM Mk2
16-12-12, 01:56 AM
OK Thanks for that Bug.

Cheers
JKM

buglerbilly
28-12-12, 11:15 PM
US Army places new I-MILES TVS order

28 December 2012 - 11:28 by the Shephard News Team



Cubic Defense Applications has announced that it has received a new order from the US Army’s Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation (PEO STRI) for its Instrumentable MILES Tactical Vehicle Systems (I-MILES TVS). The $12.5 million order was announced on 18 December.

I-MILES TVS uses Cubic’s wireless vehicle Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) technology to provide the real-time casualty assessment necessary for MILES tactical engagement training in direct-fire, force-on-force instrumented training scenarios.

According to Cubic, the system offers advanced performance because of its weapon simulation and casualty assessment accuracy for vehicles and fixed structures. It is adaptable to any wheeled or tracked tactical vehicle and is also configurable for buildings, fixed equipment and other structures. The system also includes new features that significantly improve ease of use for soldiers, including touch-screen displays with highly intuitive graphic interfaces.

The company recently completed shipment of more than 1,000 I-MILES TVS kits to the US Army. The first six tactical vehicle systems went to Fort Carson, Colorado, where they will be used to train end users.

Cubic is to deliver over 3,000 systems under the first option of its 2010 contract with the US Army’s PEO STRI. Cubic will conclude deliveries under the first option in May 2013, then commence work on a second option, which includes the $12.5 million order.

buglerbilly
30-12-12, 03:33 AM
Report: Saudi Arabia Mulls German Tank Deal

Dec. 29, 2012 - 04:32PM

By Agence France-Presse



BERLIN — Saudi Arabia is planning to buy 30 German Dingo 2 armoured vehicles worth about 100 million euros, Bild am Sonntag reported in its Sunday edition.

Quoting sources close to the talks on a deal, the paper said Riyadh could eventually purchase up to 100 of the mine resistant, ambush protected Dingos.

The Dingo 2 is advertised by its maker Krauss-Maffei Wegmann as “the safest and best-protected wheeled vehicle in its class” with an “outstanding performance on extremely difficult terrains and under extreme climatic conditions”.

The vehicle is also fitted with a nuclear biological and chemical protection system.

Germany’s national security council of which Chancellor Angela Merkel is a member is still to make a final decision on the deal but has already given the green light in principle, said the weekly.

Saudi Arabia has repeatedly shown an interest in German tanks.

Earlier this year Bild am Sonntag reported, quoting government sources, that Riyadh wanted to buy 600-800 Leopard battle tanks, more than twice as many as originally envisaged.

For decades Germany has declined to sell such heavy weapons to Saudi Arabia because of concerns over human rights and fears for Israel’s security.

Opposition politicians and even some members of Merkel’s ruling centre-right coalition had slammed the reported tank sale, particularly in light of pro-democracy uprisings throughout the Middle East.

Some interesting variants are now available.........

Recovery version....



Battle Damage Repair (workshop) vehicle......







Utility version......

buglerbilly
07-01-13, 07:45 PM
January 5, 2013 at 7:00 am

THE SUPER OFF-ROAD FROM ISRAEL

Posted by newsdesk



The Israeli designed and built ZIBAR MK2 unique off-road automotive platform is in many aspects suited to the operational needs of special anti-terror units.

The ZIBAR Mk has an impressive 4X4 off-road specification, powered by 620 horse power by a powerful V8 engine and a robust Automatic Transmission, which enables it to handle extremely harsh terrain and tackle demanding off-road challenges.

The ZIBAR MK2 has been tested in deserts across the world in operating temperatures up to 55 degrees Celsius. Handling sand dunes, rocky trails, swamps and water. According to the Israeli company it is unstoppable!

Offering unmatched Functionality, mobility and survivability, enabling tactical forces and special units fast deployment times and high Maneuverability.



The ZIBAR MK2 offers a unique Flexible platform that can be easily and quickly tailored to each Customer’s special needs, while maintaining flexibility for future changing requirements and needs.

The ZIBAR MK 2 Characteristics:

■ Total weight of 4.2 tons and can carry a payload of 1.5 tons.
■ Overall Width: 2,130 mm (83.85”)
■ Overall Length: 4,950 mm (194.88”)
The Measured Length includes The Spare Tire, Spare Tire Mount, and Winch And Winch Mount;
■ Overall Height: 1,900 mm (74.80”)
■ Wheel Base: 3,250 mm (127.95”)
■ Top speed: 200 KM/h (124M/h)
■ Acceleration 0-100 km (0-60 M): 5 seconds
■ Approach Angle: 90 deg
■ Departure Angle: 40 deg
■ Side slope handling: 60%
■ Longitudinal slope handling: 100%
■ Ditch Crossing: 0.8 M (2.6′)
■ Step Climbing Ability: 0.75 M (2.4’)
■ Water Obstacle Crossing: 0.8 M (2.6′)
■ Operation Range: fully loaded condition – 700 Km (435 m)



Ido Off-Road Center that has developed this unique vehicle was founded in 1982 by Ido Cohen, a leading figure in the Israeli off-road arena. Ido Cohen is the general manager of Ido Off-Road Center and the head supervisor on each of the designs and improvements build by the off road center.

buglerbilly
08-01-13, 03:38 AM
New Chinese vehicle, the WOLF.............




Chinese Wolf 4x4 light armoured vehicle personnel carrier Shaanxi Baoji Special Vehicles China

armyreco
Published on 15 Dec 2012

At Eurosatory 2012 Defence Exhibition which was held in Paris in June 2012, the Chinese defence Company Shaanxi Baoji Special Vehicles Manufacturing has introduced a new 4x4 light armoured vehicle personnel carrier (APC) for the Chinese and international market, the Wolf. (Read more about the Wolf http://www.armyrecognition.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&... )

Wolftrap
08-01-13, 08:12 PM
Report: Saudi Arabia Mulls German Tank Deal

Dec. 29, 2012 - 04:32PM

By Agence France-Presse

BERLIN — Saudi Arabia is planning to buy 30 German Dingo 2 armoured vehicles worth about 100 million euros, Bild am Sonntag reported in its Sunday edition.

Quoting sources close to the talks on a deal, the paper said Riyadh could eventually purchase up to 100 of the mine resistant, ambush protected Dingos.

The Dingo 2 is advertised by its maker Krauss-Maffei Wegmann as “the safest and best-protected wheeled vehicle in its class” with an “outstanding performance on extremely difficult terrains and under extreme climatic conditions”.

The vehicle is also fitted with a nuclear biological and chemical protection system.

Germany’s national security council of which Chancellor Angela Merkel is a member is still to make a final decision on the deal but has already given the green light in principle, said the weekly.

Saudi Arabia has repeatedly shown an interest in German tanks.

Earlier this year Bild am Sonntag reported, quoting government sources, that Riyadh wanted to buy 600-800 Leopard battle tanks, more than twice as many as originally envisaged.

For decades Germany has declined to sell such heavy weapons to Saudi Arabia because of concerns over human rights and fears for Israel’s security.

Opposition politicians and even some members of Merkel’s ruling centre-right coalition had slammed the reported tank sale, particularly in light of pro-democracy uprisings throughout the Middle East.

Some interesting variants are now available.........

Here a related french article...
http://www.boursier.com/actualites/news/defense-berlin-bloquerait-deux-contrats-francais-avec-l-arabie-saoudite-512190.html

Apparently the german government blocks Mercedes-Benz from supplying UNIMOG chassis to Nexter. Those chassis would eventually be used for the Aravis destined for Saudi Arabia. Now, Saudi Arabia is requesting KMW Dingo 2 in the NBC-Version. Just wondering out loud:

- Isn't there a french option for a NBC version based on the Aravis?
- Is this something to sweeten the German side? Grant export for KMW Dingo 2 to unfreeze the Nexter Aravis.
- Is the German government blocking Nexter through Mercede-Benz so that Saudi Arabia would replace its order with Dingo 2's instead of Aravis? Now that would be a double standard...

Also interesting is the weapon station on the MPCV. If that one receives German export approval it might be an early indicator for the prospects of Leopard 2 and Boxer for Saudi Arabia. At least one company to benefit from it is listed ...

But who knows whether the German government dares to decide prior to the general elections this year.... :jerkit

buglerbilly
15-01-13, 09:31 PM
January 14, 2013 at 21:32

Supacat Delivers Enhanced SOV to Australia

Posted by Tamir Eshel


Supacat HMT Extenda 6×6 equipped with remote weapon station and pintle mounted 7.62mm machine gun.

Last month Supacat has delivered the first prototype of its new special operations vehicle to the Australian Defence Force. In April 2012 Supacat emerged the preferred bidder to provide a prototype vehicle for the Special Operations Vehicle element of the Australian Defence Material Organisation (DMO)’s JP2097 Ph 1B (REDFIN) program. The vehicle is the latest version of Supacat’s Special Forces HMT Extenda. The new vehicle retains a high level of commonality with the Australian Army’s existing Nary HMT fleet, delivered by Supacat in 2009, but provides improved capabilities, particularly in crew protection and vehicle versatility. The DMO will use the prototype during the evaluation phase in support of the options that will be provided to Government at second pass.

For this program Supacat Pty Ltd. has partnered with a team of 14 Australian companies. Supacat Team Australia partners include: Aerostaff, Andrew Engineering, Baker and Provan, Broens Industries, Cablex, Eggler Consulting Engineers, Hallmark Logistics & Engineering, Hofmann Engineering, Marand Precision Engineering, PS Management Consultants, QinetiQ, Tectonica Australia, Unique Solution Partners and VEEM. The team is also working with Elbit Systems of Australia – a subsidiary of the Israeli C4ISR and battle management systems and equipment provider for the Australian military.

In March 2012 Supacat Pty Ltd, the local subsidiary of the British high mobility vehicle specialist acquired the business assets and staff of engineering design services provider, Melbourne, AustraliaUnique Solution Partners Pty Ltd. ”Supacat’s REDFIN 1B solution offers capability improvements in the key areas of firepower, protection, capacity, operability and safety, based upon direct feedback from the worldwide operational use of existing HMT fleets. There are also a number of additional options offered that the ADF may wish to choose,” Mr Mick Halloran Managing Director, Supacat Pty Ltd said.

The new vehicle, while retaining a high level of commonality with the Australian Army’s existing `Nary` HMT fleet, delivered by Supacat in 2009, provides improved capabilities, particularly, in the areas of crew protection and vehicle versatility. Supacat’s HMT series combines high levels of mobility, protection, payload and firepower. Designed for use by Special Forces, the HMT Extenda is is the most capable vehicle in its class. Its unique in being convertible to either a 4×4 or 6×6 configuration, to meet different operational requirements by inserting or removing a self-contained third axle unit. The vehicle can be supplied with optional mine blast and ballistic protection kits and with a variety of mission hampers, weapons, communications, ISTAR and force protection equipment to suit a wide range of operational roles.

Nick Ames, Managing Director of Supacat Ltd, said, “The REDFIN 1B award is pivotal to Supacat’s expansion and confirms the superiority of our HMT series as the Special Operations `vehicle of choice`. With our development of an in-country design and engineering capability, it positions Supacat to access future opportunities in the expanding Australian defence market as well as in diversified industry sectors in the Asia Pacific region”.


Supacat HMT 6×6 SOV was selected for testing for the REDFIN 1B (JP2097 Ph 1B) project. Photo: Supacat

buglerbilly
17-01-13, 11:03 AM
New light weight vehicle recovery mats unveiled

16 January 2013 - 12:58 by the Shephard News Team



Faun Trackway has introduced a new light weight vehicle recovery mat (LVRM) system, enhancing its portfolio of ground mobility systems. The new lightweight women matting is designed to provide a recovery solution for vehicles of up to 10 tonnes that have become bogged down.

The company has developed the new matting system using a composition of durable textile strips and reinforced epoxy transverse rods, to provide even wheel load distribution to military and civilian vehicles with pneumatic tyres.

The LVRM system weighs 9lb, and is suitable for use in very soft muddy or snowy conditions as well as loose, granular sand. According to the company, it can be quickly rolled out laid by hand to minimise the time a force is out of action. The non-slip material is resistant to both chemical and biological degradation and can be easily cleaned and repackaged for future use. Offering 15 sq ft of ground covering as standard, there is also the option of ordering bespoke sizes to suit forces’ specific needs.

Michael Holdcraft, vice president of business development at Faun Trackway, said: ‘There’s been much interest from expeditionary forces with small vehicle fleets for a robust, lightweight recovery solution, which is what we’ve delivered with the LVRM. The new system neatly complements our existing product catalogue, delivering multi-terrain capabilities at a much lower weight. We’re confident it will prove popular with a range of military organisations.’

buglerbilly
17-01-13, 11:22 AM
The EXTENDA pics keep on vanishing, here they are on a secure source...............

buglerbilly
18-01-13, 11:54 AM
LM JLTV Undergoes Successful Design Review



Lockheed Martin’s [NYSE: LMT] family of Joint Light Tactical Vehicles successfully completed a top-to-bottom government design review in late December, well ahead of the first Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) JLTVs that will begin rolling off the assembly line this spring.

The Design Understanding Review, which was held December 18 through 20, assessed all elements of Lockheed Martin’s JLTV design and confirmed its overall maturity and requirements compliance.

“We are focused on ensuring that our servicemen and women get the very best equipment for the mission,” said Scott Greene, vice president of Ground Vehicles for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. “Our JLTV is affordable both to buy and to operate. It provides proven performance with room to upgrade capabilities as required and is ready for production.”

In refining its EMD design, the Lockheed Martin team optimized a JLTV model already proven in government testing. The production-enhanced JLTV maintains the proven force protection, transportability and reliability of the earlier Technology Demonstration model, while significantly reducing weight and cost. Lockheed Martin’s JLTV design reflects improvements from more than 160,000 combined testing miles.

The JLTV family of vehicles is designed to replace and supplement the existing fleet of Army and Marine Corps Humvees. Compared to existing vehicles, JLTV will provide greatly improved crew protection, lower logistical support costs, superior fuel efficiency and state-of-the-art connectivity with other platforms and systems. Government tests show the Lockheed Martin design equals the high blast-protection standards of much larger mine-resistant vehicles serving in combat today.

In August 2012, Lockheed Martin received a $65 million contract from the Army and Marine Corps to continue developing its JLTV design through the EMD phase. Assembly of the first EMD JLTVs is under way at BAE Systems’ military-vehicle manufacturing plant in Sealy, Texas.

Source : Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE: LMT)

Published on ASDNews: Jan 17, 2013

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-47179/LM_JLTV_Undergoes_Successful_Design_Review.htm#ixz z2IKLUSbt4

buglerbilly
22-01-13, 09:38 PM
Italian Combat Vehicle in New Fight with Russian Tigr

(Source: RIA Novosti; published January 21, 2013)

MOSCOW --- A controversial contract for the delivery of Italian light multirole vehicles (LMV) to Russia appears to have survived the recent reshuffle of the Russian Defense Ministry's leadership that saw the dismissal of Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov and his arms procurement chief Alexander Sukhorukov.

But future deliveries of the Lynx may depend on new trials to be held within months as newly-appointed Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu and his team want to eliminate all controversy around the contract.

Serdyukov and Sukhorukov actively lobbied for the Iveco LMV M65 Lynx, which was picked over the locally produced GAZ-2330 Tigr armored vehicle in a rare departure from the military's principle of "buying domestic."

Tigr is a high-mobility multirole military vehicle manufactured by Russia’s Military-Industrial Corporation (MIC), a GAZ Group division, at the Arzamas machine-manufacturing plant.

The decision to buy Lynx has been widely publicized in Russia, after the Italian vehicle proved its superb armor protection during NATO operations in Iraq and Afghanistan but Tigr, which the maker claims is at least 70 percent cheaper, showed superior off-road performance at the Russian comparative trials in 2010 and is considered by Russian experts to be better suited to the needs of the Russian army.

Russian critics have also argued the initial agreement on the purchase of 60 vehicles, signed in 2011, did not stipulate post-assembly servicing, the supply of spare parts and training of Russian personnel by Italian experts.

Russia is planning to resolve these issues through additional negotiations in the near future, according to Deputy Defense Minister Yury Borisov, who replaced Sukhorukov in the wake of the reshuffle in November 2012.

Russia has a solid contract for the delivery of 358 Iveco LMVs, dubbed Rys in Russian, and the ministry has no intention of scrapping this contract, Borisov said in December last year.

The first 57 vehicles were assembled last year with 10 percent local content at a plant in Voronezh. The remaining vehicles will be assembled in 2013 at a new KAMAZ plant in Tatarstan, which has the capacity to assemble up to 500 Iveco LMVs per year with 50-80 percent local content, according to KAMAZ officials.

Meanwhile, the fate of a possible huge follow-on order for LMVs in Russia has not yet been sealed.

As part of the 2011-2020 state arms procurement program, the Defense Ministry plans to buy 1,775 LMVs by 2015 for $1 billion, and they may not all be Iveco models.

In December, Shoigu ordered new comparative tests of the Rys and the improved Tigr-M, which features a new Russian-made YaMZ-534 diesel engine, improved armor, and protection against nuclear, biological and chemical threats.

The trials, to be held in the first quarter of 2013, will focus on testing the vehicles' armor, MIC spokesman Sergei Suvorov confirmed in an interview with RIA Novosti on Monday.

“Despite the claims of superb protection [by NATO standards], the Iveco vehicle’s armor has never been tested in Russia,” Suvorov said.

He also claimed Tigr-M provides adequate armor protection which covers a larger area of the vehicle interior than the Italian vehicle.

The Iveco and Tigr vehicles employ a different design philosophy in the way they use armor to protect their crews. The Russian vehicle is equipped with a solid armored shell, while the Italian model uses armor panels attached to the vehicle's frame.

The interior of the vehicles also differ significantly. The Iveco interior has several partitions, with the driver and commander separated from the passengers. In contrast, the Tigr is not internally partitioned, and any passenger can take the wheel without exiting the vehicle - an obvious safety feature in battle.

The Italian vehicle is also smaller and can seat just five people, including the driver, whereas the Tigr seats nine.

Italy, a NATO member, has produced Lynx LMVs for a number of European countries, including Austria, Belgium, Britain, Norway and Spain, at a unit cost of about $300,000.

Suvorov refused to comment on the future of the Iveco contract in Russia, saying a decision will be made by Russia’s top military leadership regardless of the outcome of the new tests.

“Our concern is to provide a reliable and efficient combat vehicle for the Russian military, which we did,” he said. “The rest is up to the military commanders.”

-ends-

buglerbilly
02-02-13, 09:35 AM
HDT Storm™
hdtglobal
Published on 21 Jan 2013
Introducing HDT Global Search and Rescue Tactical Vehicles (SRTV). Visit www.hdtglobal.com to learn more about the HDT Storm.

HDT Announces Storm SRTV Awarded GAARV Contract

February 1st, 2013



In case you missed our coverage last month of the Air Force selection of the HDT Storm Search and Rescue Tactical Vehicles (SRTV) as the Guardian Angel Air-Deployable Rescue Vehicle (GAARV), we present HDT Global’s press release. The GAARV is an airdroppable, all terrain vehicle designed to transport Guardian Angel Weapon System members which consists of the Combat Rescue Officer (CRO), Pararescue (PJ), and SERE careerfields and their patients/survivors in rescue and recovery scenarios.

Jan. 21, 2013 – HDT Global (HDT), a leading provider of highly-engineered mobile military and emergency response solutions, announced today that the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC) has awarded the company’s Expeditionary Systems Group the Guardian Angel Air-Deployable Rescue Vehicle (GAARV) contract to produce the HDT Storm Search and Rescue Tactical Vehicles (SRTV).

The HDT Storm is an ultra-lightweight, air-deployable tactical vehicle that offers Guardian Angel rescue teams the necessary equipment to search for and recover personnel and equipment in austere geographic locations. The unique vehicle platform provides unparalleled speed, payload, range and durability.

“We are thrilled to support the Guardian Angel organization through GAARV. The HDT Storm expands our product offerings consistent with our mission at HDT Global to provide innovative solutions for the U.S. Military and Allied Forces,” said Jason Chamberlain, President and CEO, HDT Global.

“The HDT Storm gives the Guardian Angel Teams the capability to perform their mission, particularly when facing terrain impassable using other vehicles,” added Robin Stefanovich, Business Development for Vehicles and Robotics, HDT Expeditionary Systems Group. “Although extremely lightweight, this vehicle has the necessary power and performance to deliver personnel and equipment to their desired destination, away from an area of high threat to a defendable location.”

Developed through expertise founded in off-road racing and years of real-life customer-centric engineering, the HDT Storm is a fielded solution ready for full-rate production. The Storm SRTV ensures mission range, provides multi-role configurations and can be transported internally by M/HC-139P/N/J, C-130/C-130J, KC-130J and C-17 fixed-wing aircraft, as well as the CH-47 and CH-53 helicopters. To further enhance mission capability, the vehicle can drive on and drive off these aircraft without shoring and can be deployed through low velocity aerial delivery or Joint Precision Airdrop System (JPADS) methods.

For more information about the HDT Storm SRTV and HDT Global, visit www.hdtglobal.com.

buglerbilly
07-02-13, 01:17 PM
Amsafe Bridport Wins MoD Contract for Innovative Tarian RPG Armour

(Source: AmSafe Bridport Limited; issued Feb. 7, 2013)



AmSafe Bridport Limited has won a contract for the UK MoD’s requirement for Improved Rocket Propelled Grenade protection for its military vehicles. AmSafe’s Tarian® Rocket Propelled Grenade (RPG) Armour System has been selected for the requirement. The Contract Award follows an international competition for the MoD’s requirement where Tarian was one of three solutions down-selected for a programme of rigorous testing and trials, including live firing and vehicle field trials.

The contract includes the supply of several hundred Tarian RPG Armour System kits for a number of vehicle types that are currently in service in Afghanistan. The contract is valued at £10.6m ($17m) and will be completed by the end of 2013.

Tarian is a revolutionary, lightweight and flexible RPG Armour System which protects military vehicles against rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) attacks. Compared with traditional bar armour RPG protection, Tarian provides improved protection performance and, being significantly lighter, enables vehicles to operate more efficiently.

Tarian has been deployed and proven on vehicles in Afghanistan since May 2009, and as QuickShield bar armour repair kits, fitted to vehicles to replace damaged bar armour, since April 2011.

Tarian technology has been developed in response to a requirement from the military for a lightweight, higher performance and more robust alternative to traditional, heavy, metal bar armour RPG protection systems. The core element of the Tarian RPG defeat mechanism is an extremely strong textile net manufactured from high-tenacity fibres. Tarian nets are attached to vehicles using innovative flexible mounts that enable the system to withstand harsh vehicle operating conditions without sustaining damage.

Neal McKeever, Sales & Marketing Director at AmSafe Bridport Ltd, said:

“AmSafe Bridport is delighted to have won this significant contract for the UK MoD. This contract win demonstrates that Tarian is the RPG protection technology of choice to meet armed forces requirements for effective RPG protection that is light weight, operationally effective and affordable.”

BACKGROUND NOTES:

a. Tarian has been developed as a lightweight modular system designed to replace the traditional bar or slat armour at a weight savings of up to 98 per cent. Those vehicles that cannot accommodate the added weight of traditional RPG armour, such as the Foxhound, can now be outfitted and protected with Tarian.

b. The Tarian technology was originally introduced into active military service in May 2009 and has been rigorously tested – in the UK by the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory – an MOD agency – and in the US by its Department of Defense counterpart – DARPA – to include over 800 live firing shots. This testing has verified both a high level of performance and a multi-hit capability inherent in the Tarian technology.

-ends-

buglerbilly
16-02-13, 02:38 AM
Oshkosh Defense Unveils L-ATV Utility Variant for JLTV Program

(Source: Oshkosh Defense; issued Feb. 14, 2013)



OSHKOSH, Wis. --- Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, has unveiled its Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) utility variant for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program.

The L-ATV utility variant fulfills the JLTV requirement for a two-seat cargo vehicle, while the L-ATV base variant meets the requirement for a 4-seat multipurpose vehicle. Both Oshkosh L-ATV variants leverage a common crew protection system, advanced automotive systems, and the patented Oshkosh TAK-4i™ intelligent independent suspension system to deliver unprecedented levels of protection and off-road performance in a light vehicle.

The Oshkosh L-ATV utility variant is designed to provide mobility for loads such as containers, pallets and break bulk cargo in a wide range of operating environments and threat levels. In addition to hauling cargo, the L-ATV utility variant can be outfitted as a shelter carrier to carry standard shelters for communications systems, on-board electronics and other functions. The vehicle can transport two passengers and has a payload capacity of more than 5,100 pounds. The vehicle’s performance was demonstrated at the 2013 NATC Technology Rodeo, which took place Feb. 6 at the Nevada Automotive Test Center (NATC) near Carson City, Nev.

“The landscapes and threats of tomorrow’s battlefields are unpredictable, and state-of-the-art equipment will be absolutely necessary to protecting lives and completing missions,” said John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Joint and Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “The Oshkosh L-ATV utility variant is the most technologically advanced, most mature JLTV solution for Warfighters to complete transport missions on those battlefields.”

Oshkosh engineered the L-ATV with a high level of commonality to streamline fleet sustainment, yet each variant is tailored to optimize performance for its unique role.

Oshkosh successfully completed its JLTV design understanding review with the government and is on schedule to deliver 22 JLTV prototypes this summer under the Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) contract. The company began production of its JLTV offering shortly after receiving the contract and is using LEAN processes, a rigorous quality-assurance system and an efficient supply chain to deliver high-quality and affordable L-ATVs that meet or exceed JLTV requirements.

Oshkosh has extensive experience delivering a high level of operational discipline and quality control across a platform with multiple variants. The company has met its delivery schedules and set new standards of quality for the U.S. Army’s Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV), which consists of 17 variants and 23 configurations, while delivering significant cost savings to the Department of Defense over the life of the contract. Oshkosh also has delivered more than 8,700 MRAP All-Terrain Vehicles (M-ATV) on-time and on-budget. The M-ATV is the only vehicle performing the JLTV’s mission profile in-theater and has a field readiness rate of 95 percent.

Oshkosh is displaying the L-ATV base vehicle at Marine West, Feb. 13-14 at Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.

Oshkosh Defense is a leading provider of tactical wheeled vehicles and life cycle sustainment services. For more than 90 years, Oshkosh has been mobilizing military and security forces around the globe by offering a full portfolio of heavy, medium, light and highly protected military vehicles to support our customers’ missions.



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buglerbilly
18-02-13, 10:47 AM
Renault Announces Deals at Abu Dhabi Arms Fair

Feb. 17, 2013 - 01:18PM

By AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

ABU DHABI — Renault Trucks Defense on Sunday announced orders for armored vehicles from Middle East and African states, at the start of the IDEX military fair in the United Arab Emirates.

RTD, an affiliate of Sweden’s Volvo, said in a statement that “a Middle Eastern country” placed an order for 46 Shepra armored vehicle, but it did not disclose the value of the order.

The 9.6-ton vehicle carries a crew of six and can travel at a speed of 120 kilometers (77 miles) per hour.

The manufacturer also said it began delivering 10 Sherpa armored personnel carriers and 22 Higard carriers ordered by Qatar in October, equipped with non-lethal weapons for use by riot police.

RTD said it has built 14 off-road ALTV ambulances for an undisclosed African country.

More than 1,000 exhibitors from 57 nations, including top military manufacturers, are taking part in the International Defence Exhibition and Conference, held every two years in the UAE capital.

buglerbilly
18-02-13, 01:07 PM
Mortar-capable MRAP destined for Afghanistan

18 February 2013 - 6:00 by Tim Fish in Abu Dhabi



A new mortar variant of the Commando MRAP family of vehicles built by Textron Marine & Land Systems has been shown at the IDEX exhibition for the first time.

Speaking to Shephard, company vice president of strategy and director of operations, Afghanistan, Brian Feser, said that there was a requirement from the Afghan National Army (ANA) for a mortar-capable MRAP vehicle to provide additional fire support to their troops.

Textron is contracted to deliver 627 Mobile Strike Force Vehicles (MSFVs) to Afghanistan by the end of 2014 and 344 have been delivered or are in transit to date. The mortar variant will comprise 50 of the total number.

The new mortar variant vehicle has a base platform that can house any mortar system that can fire rounds up to 120mm through open hatches in the roof and it can hold 82 rounds. The mortar mount can fire at an azimuth of up to a 360-degrees and a firing elevation of 45 to 85 degrees. Feser said that a 90mm direct fire variant is also in development for the ANA.

Textron is delivering the MSFVs to Afghanistan at a rate of 25-30 per month and the vehicles will provide motorised transport and support to seven ANA battalions. The company is also providing operator support and sustainment services to train the users and mentor them to ensure they can use the vehicle effectively.

The mortar vehicle is part of Textron’s Commando Select vehicle range that also includes an ambulance and a turreted variant. With a gross vehicle weight of 17,237kg and fitting with a Cummins 6CTA8.3 280 hp engine it can reach a top speed of 100kph and provides protection against direct and indirect weapons, mines and IEDs.

buglerbilly
18-02-13, 01:09 PM
Thales and Renault team for vehicle digitisation

17 February 2013 - 14:42 by Tim Fish in Abu Dhabi

Under an agreement announced at the IDEX exhibition in Abu Dhabi, Thales and Renault Defense Trucks will cooperate on the development of digitised vehicle systems.

The intention is to provide real-time communications between vehicles to improve situational awareness and the cooperation of units when engaging on the battlefield.

Fighting vehicles and armoured security vehicles will be considered for the systems and the agreement outlined three operational areas that would benefit from the introduction of digital systems: army surveillance and reconnaissance units, security and special forces; battlegroups consisting of different types of combat and support vehicles; and security and law enforcement units, particularly in urban environments.

The agreement expands on an earlier arrangement between the two companies initiated last year that saw them cooperate on developing digital systems for the VAB Mk3 armoured personnel carrier.

Digital systems will be based on the Renault Battlenet Inside system that integrates all systems on an armoured vehicle that utilises commercial-off-the-shelf technology and the Thales VSYS-Net that allows crews to cooperate with each other and with other vehicles.

The companies said that the partnership will propose the best technical solutions and value for money for future programmes and ‘ensuring the development headroom’ needed to address new requirements as they emerge.

buglerbilly
18-02-13, 01:23 PM
New Dimension In Battlefield Mobility – Germany’s New AMPV Leads The Way

(Source: Rheinmetall Defence; issued February 17, 2013)



Outstanding levels of tactical, operational and strategic mobility, compelling combat effectiveness and maximum survivability are key requirements imposed on modern military vehicles today – whether they are designed primarily for combat, command and control, mission-specific roles or transport. In contemporary conflicts, where the threat is often asymmetric yet deadly, protecting troops deployed in harm’s way from hostile fire, IED attacks, CBRN agents and even extreme climate conditions has become a top priority for commanders worldwide: around the clock and in every branch of every service.

This is reflected in the current procurement plans of the armed forces of many nations, including the Bundeswehr’s GFF/GTF project to develop protected C4I and mission-specific vehicles as well as protected transport capacity. Under this programme, Rheinmetall and Krauss-Maffei Wegmann (KMW) of Germany have joined forces to develop a highly protected family of armoured multipurpose vehicles (AMPV) in the 10-ton weight class. Their design and layout take full account of operational experience accumulated by the German armed forces in Afghanistan and elsewhere.

Slightly over five metres long, two metres wide and two metres high, the AMPV has successfully passed an intense testing and trial phase by the German armed forces and is now fully qualified for series production.

With an empty weight of roughly 7.8 tons the AMPV can carry a payload of over two tons. The highly protected vehicle cell consists of a self-supporting steel hull with composite armour and spall liner. The reinforced flooring and cellular design offer excellent protection against mines and IEDs; while add-on armour modules supply scaleable extra ballistic protection.

High mobility likewise contributes to a vehicle’s overall battlefield survivability, and the AMPV design reflects this. The vehicle’s robust chassis, featuring independent wheel suspension, is engineered to withstand maximum punishment. An automatic transmission, permanent all-wheel drive, automatic differential locking management and combat wheels with a central tyre inflation system combine to assure superb mobility even in the toughest terrain.

A patrol version of the AMPV (with an unprotected load space) will be available, as well as mission module carriers with a safety cell extending all the way back to the rear of the vehicle. For enhanced lethality, a remote control weapon station (up to .50 cal.) can be mounted on any AMPV vehicle.



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buglerbilly
20-02-13, 01:42 PM
Textron Introduces 2 New Vehicles to its Commando Family of Vehicles

(Source: Textron Inc.; issued Feb. 18, 2013)



Textron Marine & Land Systems, an operating unit of Textron Systems, today introduced the addition of two vehicles to its Commando family of vehicles at the International Defence Exhibition and Conference (IDEX 2013). The new Commando Select Mortar Vehicle and Commando Utility Baserunner are being shown in Booth 03-B30 during IDEX 2013.

Designed to meet growing requirements of international combat units for a more operationally flexible and adaptable under-armor indirect fire capability, the new Commando Select Mortar Vehicle is capable of firing up to 120mm mortars from a common mount, and stowing up to 82 rounds of high explosive, illumination and smoke rounds. The vehicle is expandable to other fire control systems. The Mortar Vehicle mount also can fire at an azimuth of up to a 360-degrees and a firing elevation of 45 to 85 degrees.

Three other Commando Select variants are currently being produced and fielded for the Afghanistan National Army. Like all vehicles in this line, the Mortar Vehicle exceeds MRAP levels of crew protection and takes advantage of the proven mobility and survivability of TM&LS' Commando family of armored vehicles. Commando Select vehicles are easy to operate and maintain, with readily available parts, training and service support.



TM&LS’ new Baserunner 4x4 selectable gas/electric hybrid Commando Utility vehicle is built to facilitate missions in forward and rear echelon operational environments. These vehicles perform demanding tasks with ease, allowing users to efficiently and safely complete tasks. In gas mode the Baserunner powers through rough terrain and adverse conditions while electric mode provides quiet vehicle operation.



The Commando Utility vehicle line also includes the Survivable Combat Tactical Vehicle (SCTV) System, an MRAP-style fully armored monocoque v-hull crew capsule designed to replace the crew compartment of the HMMWV in a one-for-one exchange. The SCTV is offered by Granite Tactical Vehicles Inc. and Textron Marine & Land Systems.

"These vehicles offer current and potential customers the new capabilities they seek," said Tom Walmsley, TM&LS senior vice president and general manager. "A number of international militaries have expressed a need for a Mortar vehicle that combines indirect fire capabilities with outstanding mobility and protection, while others have expressed a desire for a robust and flexible utility vehicle to support military base operations. We’re pleased to bring both to market while expanding the range of our Commando vehicle lines."

Rigorously tested and proven in the toughest environments, the Commando family of vehicles offers a range of protection up to and exceeding MRAP level, unmatched on-road/off-road mobility and ample firepower. TM&LS produces four lines of Commando four-wheeled vehicles – Commando Utility, Commando Advanced, Commando Select and Commando Elite.

As an end-to-end armored vehicle provider, TM&LS also offers its customers Commando fielding, training, maintenance and logistics support throughout each vehicle's life cycle.

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buglerbilly
20-02-13, 08:56 PM
JLTV, GCV programs face uncertain futures

by Mike Hoffman on February 19, 2013



The Army’s plans to overhaul its vehicle fleet by replacing the Humvee and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle could see significant delays should the Pentagon absorb the devastating budget cuts associated with sequestration and the continuing resolution.

Army brass had hoped to replace the Humvee with the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV), and the Bradley with Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) with trucks and armored vehicles starting to roll off factory lines toward the end of this decade. However, Army acquisition officials have already announced a delay to the GCV and defense analysts fear a similar fate could face the JLTV program.

Soldiers and defense industry officials will discuss the future of two of the Army’s top modernization priorities at this week’s Association of the U.S. Army Winter Symposium at Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The uncertainty that surrounds the Army’s budget future has left both defense companies and the Army waiting to see how much funding they will have to support the modernization programs.

In January, the Army announced it will extend the Technology Development phase of the GCV program by six months and reduce the number of contracts issued for the engineering and manufacturing development phase from three to one.

The Army faces steep cuts to its budget should Congress and the White House fail to levy a deficit reduction agreement by March 1 and avoid the sequestration cuts that will subtract $500 billion from planned defense spending over the next ten years.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno told Congress that his service will have to remove $18 billion from its operations and maintenance budget between March and October should sequestration occur and Congress pass another extension of the continuing resolution.

No Army programs would be spared should these cuts come to pass to include modernization accounts. Defense analysts worry Army leaders will look to delay or cancel weapons and vehicle programs to fund other coffers to maintain readiness.

No such delays have been announced for the JTLV program – a program that inched close to the chopping block as per vehicle price estimates reached up to $500,000 a few years ago. The Army and Marine Corps have since reviewed the program and reduced the number of requirements to salvage the program, but there are those still those with doubts at how many JLTVs the Army will be able to afford to buy.

Lockheed Martin, AM General and Oshkosh each received EMD contracts for the JLTV program in August 2012. The three defense companies will have until 2014 to build their prototypes for Army testing and prove they can produce the trucks the Army hopes to replace the Humvee.

Those Humvees will age faster than they have already from 12 years at war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Odierno warned that sequestration budget cuts could force the Army to skip trips to the depot for resets from extended deployments.

Odierno told the Senate that the Army’s readiness levels will undoubtedly suffer should sequestration occur. Those readiness levels will drop partly because the Army’s fleet of vehicles will miss needed maintenance and upgrades due to potential budget cuts.

“We will have to reduce work in the depots, which will delay the reset of our equipment coming out of Iraq and Afghanistan. We will have to delay maintenance on our current fleets,” Odierno said.

Missing that maintenance could have both short term and long term effects for the vehicle fleets, the Army four-star said.

“The sad part about this is once you start these delays, it will take longer and longer and longer to catch up,” Odierno said. “So this will not be just a FY13 readiness issue, it will be a readiness issue that goes into FY14 and FY15.”

The Bradley Fighting Vehicle hasn’t seen nearly the same amount of use in Iraq and Afghanistan as the Humvee. However, the development program to replace it has faced severe questions on its affordability as per vehicle cost estimates have creeped up to the $10 million range.Congress has also raised flags over its weight. The GCV would likely weigh about 84 tons, meaning the armored troop carrier would weigh more than an Abrams tank.

Defense analysts have predicted that the Army will be forced to either upgrade the Bradley or find a similar vehicle already in production because of the costs associated with developing the armored vehicle.

Read more: http://defensetech.org/2013/02/19/jltv-gcv-programs-face-uncertain-futures/#ixzz2LTVf31Ip
Defense.org

buglerbilly
22-02-13, 10:44 PM
JLTV competitors confident despite delay potential

By Michael Hoffman Friday, February 22nd, 2013 12:29 pm



FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. – The defense companies in competition to build the military’s Humvee replacement did not seem worried about a potential delay in the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program brought on by the massive budget cuts facing the Pentagon.

Army officials said a delay in the JLTV competition is a possibility should Congress and the White House fail to come to an agreement and avoid the sequestration budget cuts set to hit the government March 1 that would cost the Pentagon $500 billion in planned defense spending over the next ten years.

The Army has already delayed the Ground Combat Vehicle program by six months while also subtracting two of the three contracts they planned to issue in the engineering and manufacturing development phase of the program because of budget cuts.

A similar fate could meet the JLTV program although the Army has already issued the three contracts for the EMD phase to AM General, Oshkosh and Lockheed Martin. All three defense companies attended the Association of the U.S. Army’s Winter Symposium here and officials from all three didn’t seem too worried about a delay.

Each company said they are progressing well in the production of the JLTV prototypes that the Army will test. The Army has asked for those 22 prototypes to be delivered in August ahead of their rigorous testing regimen.

“I don’t think a delay in the [in the overall program] would affect our ability” to continue the progress we’ve seen in the EMD phase, said Chris Vanslager, the vice president of program management and business development for AM General.

Lockheed Martin remains optimistic, although any potential delay really depends on the length of the delay and the timing of it, said Rick Vallario, director of business development for Lockheed Martin’s Tactical Missiles/Combat Maneuver Systems branch.

Executives for the three companies said they will continue to march on in the program until the Army tells them otherwise. Until then, the companies have no control over the decisions made to the Army’s budget.

“We are on schedule with our requirements and we’ll keep our nose to the grindstone,” said Mike Ivy, vice president and general manager for Oshkosh Defense.

Because Army issued the JLTV EMD contracts to the companies before sequestration hit, the funding is currently protected. Future investment, however, could obviously take a hit and change expectations for how much the Army and Marine Corps can spend on it should those budget cuts come to pass.

The JLTV program was nearly canceled when per vehicle costs reached $500,000. It was saved when the defense industry and Army leaders got together, eliminated unnecessary requirements, and dropped the per vehicle cost to $250,000.

buglerbilly
11-03-13, 09:13 PM
Textron Marine & Land Systems to Build 135 Additional Mobile Strike Force Vehicles for the Afghan National Army

(Source: Textron Inc.; issued March 7, 2013)



Textron Marine & Land Systems announced today that it has been awarded a $113.4 million firm-fixed-price contract from the U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Mich., to produce an additional 135 Mobile Strike Force Vehicles (MSFV) for the Afghan National Army (ANA). The vehicles are being contracted through the U.S. Army Foreign Military Sales (FMS) process.

Work will be performed at Textron Marine & Land Systems' facilities in the New Orleans area, with vehicle deliveries scheduled through February 2014. Three armored vehicle variants are being produced: MSFV with enclosed turret; MSFV with Objective Gunner's Protection Kit; and an MSFV ambulance.

TM&LS was awarded a contract for Mobile Strike Force Vehicle full-rate production in May 2011. Since then, the company has been fulfilling contract orders for a total of 499 vehicles. More than 300 of these vehicles have been delivered, and are either in operations with ANA kandaks (battalions) or being fielded as part of a comprehensive in-country vehicle logistics support and operator training program.

"Several kandaks are fully trained and beginning to stand up Afghanistan's quick reaction force capability," explained Tom Walmsley, TM&LS senior vice president and general manager. "These vehicles deliver a combination of lethality, survivability, mobility and sustainability crucial to the Army's ability to effectively respond to security threats and maintain the peace."

General Sher Mohammad Karimi, chief of general staff of the ANA, speaking February 6 at the International Armoured Vehicles Conference in Farnborough, UK, said high-end armored capabilities are "critical to the survival of the state to develop capabilities to fight insurgents."

General Karimi also commented that the MSFV has been "significantly upgraded from the original design to make it more survivable in the IED environment."

Part of the TM&LS Commando Select line of armored vehicles, the MSFV is derived from the combat-proven M1117 Armored Security Vehicle (ASV). All MSFVs are configured with Enhanced Survivability (ES) capability, which increases blast protection to mine-resistant, ambush-protected (MRAP) levels. The ES-equipped vehicles continue to possess the ASV's original, all-important V-shaped hull design, in addition to innovative protection design features that enable them to meet MRAP blast protection standards.

Rigorously tested and proven in the toughest environments, the Commando™ family of vehicles offers a range of protection levels, unmatched on-road/off-road mobility and superior firepower. TM&LS produces four lines of Commando four-wheeled vehicles - Commando Utility, Commando Advanced, Commando Select and Commando Elite.

As an end-to-end armored vehicle provider, TM&LS also offers its customers fielding, training, maintenance and logistics support throughout each Commando vehicle's life cycle.

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buglerbilly
13-03-13, 01:25 PM
A New Vehicle For Afghanistan

Posted March 12, 2013 by Think Defence

Came out of the blue this one..

From the RAF;



Air Vice Marshal Shaun Reynolds, Air Officer Commanding 2 Group looks at a Praetorian armoured vehicle undergoing trials with the RAF Regiment. The Praetorian is similar to a Mastiff armoured troop carrier but has a sophisticated telescopic mast mounted camera system for targeting and surveillance as well as an improved Remote Weapons Fire Control System. The Praetorian will enhance the RAF Regiment’s Force Protection capability in Afghanistan.

Looks similar to the Talisman command Mastiff, which as we know, has a similar RWS and ROTAS Electro Optical sensor mast but doesn’t have a ridiculously macho name:)







Can it get Sky +

Joking aside, good news I think

Images from the RAF’s Facebook feed

buglerbilly
18-03-13, 02:45 PM
LMV: Lessons from the Field as Drivers for Innovation

(Source: Iveco Defence Vehicles; issued March 18, 2013)



The Light Multirole Vehicle (LMV) was launched in 2006 and, from that point onwards it has been the subject of continuous development and innovation. Iveco Defence Vehicles’ appreciated from the outset that a vehicle such as LMV would have to evolve with changing requirements. The company therefore implemented a programme of product development which focused on delivering incremental improvements, usually from lessons learned in the field, whilst maintaining the excellence of the basic design.

The company’s success in achieving this has been recently recognised at the International Armoured Vehicle conference (Farnborough, UK 5-7 February) organised by IQPC in Farnborough where IVECO DV won the award for the best platform.

The recent announcement of the Norwegian Army to procure a further batch of vehicles further endorses the effectiveness of the approach adopted.

Maintaining a vehicle design weight below 8 tonnes GVW presents a continuous challenge to Iveco’s engineers, seeking to meet the demands of the user for ever more capacity, protection and protection. Iveco DV’s challenge is to maintain LMV as the technical leader in this market segment.

The first and most noticeable feature is a newly design of crew cell, still not publically launched, which is now available to customers. Internal volume and ergonomy are significantly enhanced, whilst protection is improved both through the use of novel materials, such as nanotechnology, and by design innovations which optimise performance against mines and kinetic threats.

The crew cell design has been driven in particular by the need to accommodate a fully equipped soldier, including body armour and personal equipment. Safety is enhanced by the provision of additional escape routes for the crew in case of accident. Sub-system integration is greatly eased by the adoption of a fully digitised electronic architecture, an improved power supply and by the increase in the usable volume. The result is a much simpler integration task for such mission systems as remote controlled weapon stations, BMS, intercom, and ECM.

Providing maximum agility requires a combination of appropriate weight and size, and outstanding mobility. Beside a newly launched automatic gearbox which gives an smoother transition between gears when off-road, integration of an automatic drive management system represents the best ensures that the vehicle performs optimally at all times. For the driver, this translates into a much simplified driving experience, allowing him greater opportunity to plan his route ahead, boosting both mission performance and safety.

Further mobility enhancements are available in the shape of a dedicated set of suspension kit and tyres to better match different configuration and terrains.

An additional benefit of this work was an increase of payload of some 40% to about 1.6 tonnes depending on the vehicle configuration.

Last but not least, the maintenance load has been reduced by improving the type and location of some of the subsystems and by tailoring the service regime. The fully digitised electronic system allows the introduction of on demand maintenance based on prognostics instead of scheduled preventive maintenance.

Flexibility and family approach

The ability of the LMV design to accommodate a variety of mission specific configurations has enabled a vehicle family approach to be implemented, allowing LMV to fulfil a wide variety of roles. At present, the vehicle is available in a number of different variants, with a range of different protection levels or none at all. These include the Medevac, NBC unit, Pick-up, RSTA and SOF.

This illustrates how Iveco’s modular design has been a winning choice, enabling a full family of vehicles to be rolled out, sharing much commonality and consequently reducing the logistic footprint. Nonetheless, each variant has been designed to meet the specific requirements of its given role.

Looking to the future, Iveco Defence Vehicles sees the multirole family concept as having applications across a wide range of operational scenarios. Unlike some of the more unwieldy vehicles currently deployed, where mobility has been sacrificed to protection, the LMV retains high levels of both protection and mobility, giving it the flexibility which will ensure its utility for many years to come.

LMV sales

With total sales of 4,000 units to ten different countries, the LMV is to date Europe’s vehicle of choice in its category: customers include Italy (2,000), United Kingdom (401 units), Spain (270 units), Norway (170 units), Belgium (440 units), Croatia (10 units), Austria (150 units) Czech Republic (170 units), Slovak Republic (50 units) and Russia (358 units).

On-going negotiations countries could lead to further sales outside Europe in the near future.

Iveco Defence Vehicles is dedicated to delivering innovative automotive and protection solutions to meet the needs of military customers worldwide. The company manufactures specialist military logistic, protected and armoured vehicles in its facility in Bolzano in Northern Italy, as well as marketing Iveco’s full commercial range, adapted as necessary to meet the demands of the military user.

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buglerbilly
20-03-13, 10:01 PM
Textron Awarded Contract to Produce Turrets and Provide Support for Colombia's APCs

(Source: Textron, Inc.; issued March 19, 2013)

Textron Marine & Land Systems (TM&LS) announced today a $5.5 million contract award from the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM) to provide 12 armored turrets, technical support services, vehicle repairs and spare parts for the Colombian Army's (COLAR) Armored Personnel Carriers (APC).

The COLAR has 39 Commando Advanced APCs in operation with its Armored Cavalry units and, under a separate U.S. Foreign Military Sales case, has requested to purchase additional APCs.

Since fielding its APCs in May 2010, the COLAR has employed them extensively while combating internal revolutionary forces in Colombia. These vehicles have provided the mobility, protection and firepower needed to meet all COLAR tactical armored vehicle requirements.

TM&LS' APC is an extended version of the M1117 Armored Security Vehicle (ASV), combat proven over 10 years and used by the U.S. Army and other militaries in locations including Afghanistan and Iraq. The APC's additional two feet in length and six inches in internal height allow greater troop carrying capacity in areas of operations.

These vehicles are part of the Commando Advanced line of armored vehicles, which offer excellent on-road and off-road mobility enabling them to operate in urban, jungle, desert and mountainous terrain. Crew protection is reinforced with a V-shaped hull bottom and 360-degree protection from direct fire.

"This contract is an extension of our positive working relationship with the Colombian Ministry of Defence and Army leadership, and an example of our capability as a full-spectrum armored vehicle provider," said Textron Marine & Land Systems Senior Vice President and General Manager Tom Walmsley.

"Colombia's APCs are performing exceptionally well in a variety of operational roles, while offering outstanding protection to COLAR soldiers. Building on this success, we're working with Colombia to increase the number of APCs in COLAR units while sustaining its entire vehicle fleet with a coordinated program of maintenance, training and field service support," Walmsley added.

Rigorously tested and proven in the toughest environments, the Commando family of vehicles offers a range of protection options, unmatched on-road/off-road mobility and ample firepower. TM&LS produces four lines of Commando four-wheeled vehicles - Commando Utility, Commando Advanced, Commando Select and Commando Elite.

As an end-to-end armored vehicle provider, TM&LS also offers its customers Commando fielding, training, maintenance and logistics support throughout each vehicle's life cycle.

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buglerbilly
22-03-13, 03:41 PM
Turkish procurement office warns armored vehicle maker

İZMİR- Anatolia News Agency

Turkey has set a one-month deadline for BMC to deliver 175 armored vehicles promised to be completed due to a year and a half ago and said it may consider to buy vehicles from other companies


BMC has agreed to sell 468 Kirpis, armored vehicles, to Turkish defense ministry, but due to its financial problems the production is still175 Kirpis behind. DHA photo

The Turkish Defense Industry Undersecretariat has given BMC, the maker of Turkey’s Kirpi brand armored carriers, a one-month deadline to deliver 175 Kirpis and 105 trucks that the company has failed to deliver thus far due to its financial problems, a high official at the undersecretariat has said.

“It should solve this problem within a month, but if they cannot we need to procure this [order] for the Turkish Armed Forces from somewhere else,” said Levent Şenel, the head of the Defense Industry Undersecretariat’s land vehicles department.

The National Defense Ministry had signed a deal in 2009 with BMC to produce 468 Kirpis and trucks in a range of sizes, to be delivered by the end of 2012.

BMC is currently 175 armored carriers and 105 2.5-ton-capacity trucks behind the agreed schedule. Along with the military, police forces are also waiting for 468 Kirpi with past-due delivery dates.

The company has been in a tight squeeze since last May, when the company first failed to pay salaries on time, and production at BMC factories have halted several times in the intervening period. As a last resort, unpaid workers have protested against the company by marching to Ankara and Istanbul from İzmir, where BMC production is located.

“We have been following this issue, though the public may not always be aware of it, and we have been warning the company regularly,” Şenel said.

“This is the first time we have encountered something like this,” he said. “There is a satisfactory vehicle that has passed all the tests and a buyer ready to pay, but the producer cannot deliver the order.”
Şenel, who still praises the quality of BMC’s products, said the problem underlying the delay must be the poor financial management of the company.

The official said Turkey had been patient for a year and a half, the total amount of time spent waiting for the delivery, but that the delay had costs for the state due to losses incurred as time passed. In addition to the financial burden, BMC would also be held responsible if any soldier were to be killed in a mine attack in the meantime, he said, adding that these factors were causing the state to run out of patience.

Other choices

Şenel said Turkey is not dependent on BMC for developing these vehicles and that if the problems persisted for much longer, it could easily consider these options.

In his remarks, he mentioned another manufacturer, Otokar, as possible option, as this company produces the same type of vehicles.

“During the tender process, we chose the Kirpi on the basis of its advantages but Otokar went on to create its own prototype. After testing the first one, it also produced another one in a different size. If we want to buy a ready-made one, there is a proper vehicle available.”

He said in addition to Otokar, FNNS was another company that could also develop this kind of vehicle.
Despite the many alternatives available from various companies, it is still hoped and expected that BMC will recover and fulfill its obligations.

Şenel hinted that BMC had been working toward a rapid recovery through a partnership.

March/21/2013

buglerbilly
01-04-13, 09:29 AM
SRATS which stands for "Specialized Reconnaissance Assault and Transport System" undergoin testing somewhere we all hope to be leaving soon-ish.............I'm a bit surprised to not see this vehicle "obviously" go further in the way of orders............



Peek-a-boo version........



A bunch parked up.......

buglerbilly
02-04-13, 06:23 PM
Navy Designs Mechanized Rear-Door Assist for Mine Resistant Vehicles

(Source: US Navy; issued March 29, 2013)

PANAMA CITY, Fla. --- The U.S. Marine Corps' Mine Resistant Ambush Protection (MRAP) Buffalo vehicles were designed to protect Marines from Improvised Explosive Devices, and the Navy is improving MRAPs this March by upgrading them with a new Rear-Door Assist (RDA) mechanism.

Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) Buffalo Systems Deputy Project Engineer Steven (Tate) Carow said the Buffalo MRAP trucks currently do not have a power system to assist opening its rear door.

"Currently, the vehicle's rear door requires a manual effort to open, and it weighs approximately 500 pounds. It is designed so one person can open it on flat ground. However, should there be an emergency situation like a rollover, if the vehicle has to park on uneven terrain, or even if the heat of the environment affects the door frame's shape, the door can bind and become difficult to open," said Carow.

The Buffalo program office provided specific requirements for the RDA system to meet. With a critical requirement to improve crew survivability, some specific requirements addressed included time-to-open, reliability and environmental protection.

NSWC PCD engineers designed the RDA solution to meet these requirements, while utilizing modified commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware to reduce cost and production schedule.

The RDA system can be activated from two locations inside the vehicle and one location outside the vehicle. Multiple internal locations are provided to ensure the crew can open the door in the event of a roll-over. The external switch can be activated by first responders in the event the crew is incapacitated.

Carow said that the COTS cylinders for the RDA required only a minimal modification.

Another benefit to the team's modified COTS solution Carow pointed out is the system is self powered.

"The system has its own battery, which is charged from the truck's alternator, so even if the truck's batteries become disabled, the system has enough stored energy to open the door many times," said Carow said.

Carow explained that should the RDA battery fail for some reason, there is a backup to the normal battery-powered activation.

"If all else fails, we have a manual way to crank out the pump's hydraulic cylinder. A Marine can pull out a handle, which fits into a slot in the integrated hydraulic cylinder, and he or she can then simply use this to jack the door open," Carow said.

The Marine Corps Systems Command Assistant Program Manager for the Cat III Buffalo MRAP, Albert Shaw, said the collaboration with NSWC PCD was a win-win situation because the partnership is producing effective solutions that in many cases can be shared by several Department of Defense (DoD) entities.

"This partnering for solutions is exemplary of the DoD acting as good stewards of taxpayer's dollars," said Shaw. "It's American ingenuity at its best."

-ends-

buglerbilly
02-04-13, 10:50 PM
SOCOM may pick truck winner in May

By Brendan McGarry Thursday, March 28th, 2013 9:09 pm



U.S. Special Operations Command in coming weeks may select a company to supply it with a new four-by-four truck.

The contract for the Ground Mobility Vehicle program is valued at as much as $670 million over seven years. The deal calls for delivering 220 trucks a year, or possibly 1,540 in total. The funding would also cover spare parts, training and an electronics communications suite.

The vehicle must carry as many as seven passengers, weigh less than 7,000 pounds unloaded and be transportable in a CH-47 Chinook helicopter. The truck must also be able to fire its weapon in less than a minute upon driving off the twin-rotor aircraft.

The command, based at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, has already narrowed down the field of competitors to three companies: tank-maker General Dynamics Corp., based in Falls Church, Virginia; Humvee-maker AM General LLC, based in Sound Bend, Indiana; and truck-maker Navistar International Corp., based in Lisle, Illinois.

A final decision is expected in early May, according to an industry source with knowledge of the competition.

The winner will also probably benefit from international sales of the vehicle, or a similar version of it, especially in the Middle East. Countries such as Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait have expressed interest in upgrading their fleets of armored trucks.

The command now uses a version of the iconic Humvee, which entered U.S. Army service in 1985 and whose vulnerability to roadside blasts was exposed during the U.S.-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The Army wants to replace about a third of its Humvee fleet with a new light-duty truck called the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV. The service last summer awarded contracts to three companies — AM General, Oshkosh Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. — to build prototypes.

U.S. military vehicle programs face an uncertain future since the March 1 start of automatic budget cuts known as sequestration and last year’s strategic shift by the Pentagon away from the ground wars of the past decade and toward threats in the Asia-Pacific region.

buglerbilly
05-04-13, 03:12 PM
Italy Considers Jeep for Recon Vehicle

Apr. 5, 2013 - 07:46AM

By TOM KINGTON



ROME — The Italian connection with Jeep, the storied U.S. vehicle manufacturer, has just gotten stronger.

Following the takeover of the firm by Italy’s Fiat in 2011, the Italian military has purchased six Jeeps in the militarized J8 format for road testing to see whether they could be a long-term replacement for the Italian Army’s Land Rovers.

“We are looking at a new reconnaissance vehicle and expect all six to be delivered by year end,” an Italian defense source said.

Italy’s procurement office signed the contract in December for the J8, which is based on Jeep’s Wrangler model. A variant has already been bought by Israel.

The vehicle was the only candidate offered after Italy issued a tender in July for six vehicles, including two soft-top versions, two special operations forces versions, one hard top and one pickup. The total cost specified in the tender was 631,000 euros ($808,000) plus sales tax, including technical assistance during testing.

If the vehicles pass muster, they will be certified for military use and will be considered if a decision is made to buy new, light vehicles, the source said.

Other sources said it was premature to expect the retirement of Italian Army Land Rover Defenders anytime soon.

“They have some years left in them, and defense spending cuts mean this is not a priority,” one source said.

But the deal marks a strengthening of Italy’s role in Jeep’s future as a military vehicle, following its success in the 20th century.

Owned by Chrysler, Jeep effectively became Italian-controlled in 2011 when Italy’s Fiat took a controlling stake in Chrysler. Fiat CEO Sergio Marchionne was widely credited with pulling the U.S. manufacturer back from the brink and boosting sales to pay back U.S. government loans.

Marchionne also planned to blend U.S. and Italian car designs and technologies, including building a new Maserati SUV in Detroit based on the body of a Jeep.

The Italian procurement office signed its contract for the six Jeeps with Iveco, the Fiat unit that builds trucks but also specializes in military vehicles including the LMV, likened to an uparmored Humvee, of which 4,000 have now been sold to 10 nations. Iveco also builds the Centauro wheeled tank and the Freccia wheeled armored vehicle in partnership with Finmeccanica unit Oto Melara.

“Iveco is giving assistance on the Jeep deal, and it could prove to be an example of synergy between Iveco and Jeep since Iveco is an expert in the military business,” a source close to the company said.

“But there are no plans to build the Jeep in Italy, and this contract with the Italians is just a pilot project to test a product,” he said.

Iveco has meanwhile shelved a plan to build a Land Rover-type vehicle called the Massif. The J8 is a ruggedized, militarized version of the Jeep Wrangler offering an upgraded chassis, brakes, suspension, axles and engine cooling, and a 1,164-kilogram payload that can be augmented.

Launched at the DSEI defense show in London in 2007, the J8 has been produced in Egypt and also went into production in Israel by Automotive Industries Ltd. for supply to the Israel Defense Force, in a variant named Storm 3.

“Because of the evolution of Fiat and the Chrysler group, it makes sense to go into the Italian market with Iveco,” a company source said.

The source said J8s had been sold in Latin America and the U.S., while the U.N. has used them in Haiti. Switzerland is also close to buying the vehicle, he said.


Massif Ute

buglerbilly
06-04-13, 03:54 AM
Plasan Introduces the Spider-SC1 Surveillance Vehicle

(Source: Plasan; issued April 4, 2013)



KIBBUTZ SASA, Israel --- Plasan Security Systems, a global leader in the field of customized integrated solutions for tactical mobile platforms, is introducing its Spider-SC1 Surveillance Vehicle – a high-survivability modular suite, providing a comprehensive solution for Homeland Security needs, including border protection - at LAAD Defense & Security 2013 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on April 9-12 – Hall 3 Booth #S-28.

Spider-SC1 is a manned, 4x4, armored, high-maneuverability, all-terrain vehicle, with integrated state-of-the-art technologies - including a surveillance system for long-range day-and-night tracking, video analytics, a tactical observation balloon, and a cutting-edge two-way communications system. It is a unique, high-survivability, superior-performance solution that allows the effective handling of today’s Homeland Security needs, including protecting borders; preventing the smuggling of drugs, weapons, and persons; and dealing with terror threats in peripheral areas. This one-of-a-kind vehicle allows surveillance, and the securing of especially large geographical areas, in a fully autonomous manner, independent of additional systems.

Plasan is also proud to announce that it is currently expanding its offerings to include a 360° tailored solution for the protection of critical infrastructures, developed to effectively deal with a broad range of terror threats, natural disasters, and safety hazards. This all-inclusive solution combines advanced physical, electronic, and logical security means and measures, to prevent incidents from occurring or mitigate their consequences - including loss of life, disruption of operations, economic losses, and environmental harm. It was designed to improve resilience, allow uninterrupted operation, and reduce liability.

Plasan places its extensive know-how - gathered during numerous years of experience in providing fully tailored, cost-effective protective solutions - at the service of managers and operators of critical infrastructures. The expertise of the company’s highly skilled R&D team - in ballistics, in the analysis of a broad range of threats, in advanced materials, and in the simulation of disaster scenarios - as well as its hands-on military experience, allows it to conceptualize, develop, and engineer solutions ideally suited to deal with today’s diverse threats.

Assaf Baruch, Head of Plasan's Security Division in Brazil, stated: "Plasan is proud to introduce its pioneering Spider-SC1 Surveillance Vehicle at LAAD 2013. We are confident that this unique solution, along with our innovative command and control system, advanced mapping tools and simulation models, and our 360° solution for the protection of critical infrastructures, will ideally meet the needs of the Brazilian market. We are currently developing a mobile frontline command & control project for Homeland Security applications at the request of the Brazilian government, and with our new products and services, look forward to expanding our activities in this market."

Plasan is a global expert and world leader in the development of customized survivability solutions for tactical wheeled vehicles, aircraft, naval platforms, civilian armored vehicles, and personal protection. Plasan also provides a wide range of Homeland Security solutions - including mobile security solutions, observation systems, border security, and critical infrastructure protection.

-ends-

buglerbilly
06-04-13, 03:58 AM
Ricardo Receives Order for A Further 76 Foxhound Vehicles

(Source: Ricardo; issued April 5, 2013)

Ricardo has announced today that it has received an order from prime contractor General Dynamics Land Systems-Force Protection Europe (GDLS-FPE), for the assembly of 76 additional vehicles, bringing the total Foxhound fleet size ordered to date by the UK Ministry of Defence to 376. Arguably the world’s most agile and best-protected vehicle in its weight class, all Foxhounds vehicles are assembled by Ricardo at the purpose-designed production line commissioned in 2011.

“The Foxhound is exactly the right vehicle for British forces, providing what commanders on the ground in Afghanistan are describing as ‘an enormous leap forward’ in capability,” commented Ricardo CEO Dave Shemmans. “This highly impressive vehicle that has the potential to save many lives, has resulted from our very successful subcontract with prime contractor General Dynamics. Ricardo is proud to have assembled all of the Foxhounds ordered for British forces by the MoD.”

“Production of the Foxhound is already well underway at our special vehicle production facility where we have commissioned a dedicated production line for this purpose,” added Ricardo director of manufacturing operations Mark Barge. “Together with our work for premium vehicle customers such as Bugatti, McLaren and the motorsports industry up to and including Formula 1 teams, Ricardo has an enviable track record of manufacturing exceptional products.”

-ends-

buglerbilly
09-04-13, 01:56 PM
Renault Trucks Defense at Sofins Special Forces Show

(Source: Renault Trucks Defense; issued April 9, 2013)

Improvements of SAS Patrol Vehicles



VERSAILLES --- Further to the Special Operations Command and the French Procurement joint collaboration, Panhard will soon deliver kits to enhance the operational capabilities of VPS (vehicle patrols SAS).

These kits include:
-- Milan support - they can carry a missile launcher and several missiles, but also fire from the vehicle
-- Ballistic shields to improve protection of the 12.7 mm gunner
-- Camouflage screens Lacroix (Galix 13) to allow the vehicle to evade the opponent's views.

As a reminder, 51 VPS have been ordered by the DGA and delivered to the SOC troops in 2008.

New Version of the ALTV Torpedo ACMAT



On the occasion of the SOFINS show, Renault Trucks Defense presents a version of the ALTV Torpedo ACMAT. It will be exhibited during the dynamic show.

This new version receives a higher ground clearance (from 0.3 to 0.35m) and a wider approach angle (from 25° to 40°) in order to improve the land mobility.

In parallel to these new performances, the ALTV keeps its essential characteristics that made its international success in 2012. More than 60 ALTV (Torpedo models) were indeed sold last year. The ALTV is, thanks to its robustness and its large payload (1.4t), adapted to the needs of the Special Forces.

With a 190hp, the vehicle can reach speeds of 170km/h while its 1,600 km autonomy allows it to operate in isolated areas without logistic support. It can carry 3 ( 4 in option) men.

The ALTV is capable of operating on slopes up to 80%, side-slopes up to 100% and cross a ford of 0.5m. Finally, it is also able to support mine and ballistic protection kits, and is fitted for a manned operated machinegun on the roof (7.62/12.7/LG40mm/M134).

“Battlenet Inside” at the Heart of Renault Trucks Defense Vehicles

To meet the requirements of armed forces for modularity, growth potential and cost control, Renault Trucks Defense launched at Eurosatory 2012 an innovative vetronic solution called “Battlenet Inside”. All systems are now presented embedded on the Sherpa Scout at Sofins 2013.

The range of operations that modern military vehicles have to conduct is giving rise to increasing complexity: a wide variety of missions, multiple threats, interoperability with other armed forces, tactical situations that are often highly complex, and so on. Renault Trucks Defense intends to meet these new operational requirements by optimising the integration of more and more items of equipment into its combat vehicles, Sherpa Scout included. It is ideally suited for tactical missions such as scouting, patrol, convoy escort, command and liaison and is able to transport up to 4 or 5 soldiers. Connected on the vetronic network Battlefield, the Scout becomes a complete mission system whose operational effectiveness can be optimized and adapted for each type of operation.



The different elements on this Sherpa Scout are:

-- a light turret WASP that is remotely-controlled from inside the vehicle. It can be fitted with a MAG 58 7,62mm machine gun coupled to a day/infrared sight and observation scope for day or night observation (Panhard and Sagem Defense Systems Sécurité),
-- a portable, light and easy to use UAV called “SPYARROW” (Thales),
-- a reverse camera (Motec),
-- a long-distance secured VH/VHF communication system “HF3000” (Thales),
-- a night vision goggle with video display, ultra-compact and lightweight goggle (Thales),
-- a distant vehicle management called “e-soutien” to maximize materials support in operational condition (RTD).

All systems presented on this Sherpa Scout are connected on our vetronic network Battlenet Inside:
-- Video streams shared on vehicle displays
-- Head-up display of Commander’s monitor on Minie D Night Vision Goggles
-- Vehicle integrated ergonomic HMI for systems
-- Ability to receive drones video
-- Distant vehicle management with “e-soutien” application

Battlenet Inside is an innovative electronic architecture designed by Renault Trucks Defense. It is based on open, standardized and proven COTS solutions coming from IP technologies.

As an integrator, Renault Trucks Defence guarantees interfacing with mission kits, the interoperability of these kits, their ergonomics, and the new collaborative functionalities, while respecting the know-how of the suppliers concerned.

Renault Trucks Defense has decided to propose an open architecture capable of ensuring the interoperability of these items of equipment. At the same time, as this equipment is constantly changing, there is a need to be able to upgrade the complete system, without modifying its basic architecture, by selecting long-standing, open standards. Renault Trucks Defence ensures the modularity and growth potential of the systems integrated on its vehicles while significantly reducing life cycle costs.

Networking the mobility platform with these items of equipment allows new collaborative functions to be provided while enhancing the overall effectiveness of the mission system in operations, training and maintenance.

This “Battlenet Inside” is based on an Ethernet network and on all existing protocols for carrying images, video or voice. Video streams shared on vehicle displays, drones video reception as well as the “e-soutien” application, make the vehicle a mechanical, electrical, electronic and MMI host structure onto which mission kits can be integrated as modules:

-- Drone Spy Arrow
-- Remote Control Weapon Station WASP
-- Night Vision Goggle with Video Display
-- Reverse camera
-- E-Soutien
-- HF/VHF Communications

Renault Trucks Defense, a reference manufacturer for the terrestrial armed forces, designs and develops a full range of armoured vehicles, with the SHERPA. Legacy supplier to the French Army, with more than 4,000 VAB armoured personnel carriers in service, Renault Trucks Defense can claim more than 65 customer countries across the world. Armoured vehicles represent more than 60% of its activity, but it also has a truck offering geared to a very full range of military uses. Renault Trucks Defense participates in programmes with Nexter, such as the CAESAR artillery system and the VBCI infantry fighting armoured vehicle. It holds several brand names across the world, including ACMAT and Panhard.

-ends-

buglerbilly
10-04-13, 11:19 AM
KIA MOTORS has representation at LAAD 2013...........some of these look like time-warp copies of early 50's American vehicles.............weird! :pifreak



SSANGYONG NEW ACTYON SPORTS


KM420


AND another 50's look-alike...............KM450

buglerbilly
15-04-13, 01:42 PM
New Generation Casspir Raises the Standards for Mine-Protected Vehicles

(Source: Denel; issued April 11, 2013)



“The basic, reliable features of the CASSPIR remain the same,” says Ashley Williams, the General Manager of Denel Mechem the company which designs and manufactures the durable vehicle. “It has always been the world leader in its class – providing unequalled protection against landmines, roadside bombs and automatic rifle fire.

“Now we have upgraded the hull protection by using a higher quality of steel, increased its power, improved the accessibility for passengers and mounted it on a more versatile and reliable vehicle platform,” says Mr Williams.

The CASSPIR is the vehicle of choice for demining or military operations and has been used from Afghanistan to Mozambique, by the United Nations, the SA National Defence Force, private security companies and police services around the globe.

Denel Mechem is a world leader in the mine-action services and the battle-clearance industry. More than three decades after the first CASSPIR came off the production line in 1979 the New Generation 2000 will provide its end-users with new options and increased protection.

There are two versions of the CASSPIR NG 2000 – one mounted on a Mercedes Benz drive train and the 2000B using a Powerstar engine as platform. Both versions will feature an upgraded steel hull meeting the highest industry standards of protection.

Jack Geldenhuys, Mechem’s Manager for Vehicle Systems says the new vehicle will also feature side doors for the driver and crew and an improved back-door design for troops or passengers to enter and exit during operations.

Mr Geldenhuys says a key feature of the CASSPIR is its modular design which gives it an unrivalled level of versatility. At the Denel Mechem production facilities in Lyttelton the vehicle can be modified and adapted to meet the requirements of the client.

Thus the CASSPIR can feature in its conventional role as mine-resistant troop carrier but can also be adapted to become a field ambulance, a command-and-control vehicle, a recovery vehicle or a light transport vehicle. All variants are fitted with run-flat tyres and are available in 6X6 or 4X4 format and with a choice of manual or automatic transmission.

It has a cruising speed of 100 kph on roads and up to 40 kph on most off-road conditions with a reach of up to 800km on a standard fuel tank. It is designed to withstand the blast of 14kg of explosives under each wheel – which is more than can be delivered by two landmines.

Mr Geldenhuys says the decision to standardise the engine and drive train makes the CASSPIR a more cost-effective solution for the international agencies and defence forces that depend on its outstanding reputation for reliability. This means substantial savings on maintenance costs, spare parts and logistics.

-ends-

buglerbilly
18-04-13, 02:45 PM
Army Researchers Improve Vehicle Design with Blast Tests

(Source: US Army Research Laboratory; issued April 16, 2013)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. --- With the growing threat of improvised explosive devices over the past decade, Army researchers have been hard at work testing and evaluating ways to keep Soldiers safe from bomb blasts.

The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command analyzes under-body blasts, known as UBB.

Researchers at the Army Research Laboratory Survivability and Lethality Analysis Directorate have led to many improvements in vehicle design.

"Through live-fire tests, we have been able to provide a comprehensive characterization of the blast environment and occupant injuries during a UBB," said Sarah Coard, Army researcher. "Only by understanding the mechanism of injury can we apply engineering changes [to vehicles] to decrease the likelihood of those injuries. The blast environment is unique."

The Army's concern is always the same: how can a vehicle be modified to reduce the likelihood and severity of injuries to Soldiers?

"The test and evaluation community is working to a standard that 10 years ago would have been unimaginable," said Scott Welling, a member of SLAD's Engineering Analysis Branch. "The number of data channels that are used today in a test event is greater than five times the amount used prior to these conflicts."

Army experts are leveraging an ever-growing wealth of test data.

The Army's approach to live-fire testing, leverages mechanical engineering experts in the Engineering Analysis Branch and the crew-injury-physiology experts in the Warfighter Survivability Branch. Welling and Coard are partners as RDECOM's representatives on the integrated product team for live-fire testing. This ensures a comprehensive analysis of the survivability of both the crew and their vehicle.

"Another use for the data may be surprising," Coard said. "Improving the test instrumentation itself and refining and enhancing the test scenarios. One such instrument is the anthropomorphic test device, a crash-test dummy originally developed by the automotive industry. For UBB testing, it has become obvious that the ATD must be modified if it is to provide the most accurate data. So ARL is now leading an experimentation program to enhance the ATD for use in future tests."

Not only is instrumentation improving, but test designs have also become more sophisticated. In the past, a vehicle would often be tested with one crash-test dummy in it. Now, it is required that there be a crash-test dummy in every occupant location in a vehicle.

Officials said another significant change is the adoption of new and current injury criteria in order to make assessments more accurate and to achieve greater resolution in inferring what injuries would result and how. A further way that test design has evolved is by the introduction of new methodologies to analyze the motion of seats and floors.

The current war-time environment has caused testing specifications to grow and timelines to shrink. The Army has been responding to urgent materiel releases.

The Army is looking at the structural response of the vehicle and the survivability of its occupants.

For every vehicle or piece of equipment tested, researchers analyze the blast's effect on communications, mobility, firepower and mission success.

Because analysis demands so much more than merely capturing data, a holistic vantage point is vital, officials said. The testing enables researchers to provide this context to evaluators, program managers and vehicle designers.

-ends-

buglerbilly
19-04-13, 10:11 AM
Navistar Defense delivers first Afghan armoured cabs

19 April 2013 - 8:34 by the Shephard News Team



Navistar Defense has delivered the first batch of armoured cab units designated for service with the Afghan National Security Forces. The company is delivering the armoured cabs as part of a $23 million urgent delivery order received from the US Army in February.

Under the February contract Navistar Defense is retrofitting 205 armoured cabs onto Navistar Medium Tactical Vehicles (MTVs), which are based on the International WorkStar platform. The work involves replacing the current commercial cab with the specially designed armoured cab— providing savings by re-using the original components of the MTV.

The armoured solution will protect the Afghan National Army (ANA) and Afghan National Police (ANP) from ballistic and blast threats in the theatre of operations. The order also includes enhancing additional vehicle elements for improved survivability to provide Afghan National Security Forces with the capability to conduct route clearance missions with mine roller applications.

Representatives from Navistar Defense and the US Army’s Program Executive Office for Combat Service Support marked the completion of the first wave of deliveries during a ribbon cutting ceremony at the Navistar Defense manufacturing facility in West Point.

Bob Walsh, vice president and general manager, Navistar Defense, said: ‘Today we are celebrating the rapid manufacturing and delivery of armoured cabs that will assist in the transition of our security mission and facilitate the withdrawal of US forces while protecting the Afghan National Security Forces.’

Colonel William Boruff, US Army project manager for Transportation Systems, added: ‘This improvement is tremendously important to our Afghan allies. This solution provides a robust route clearance capability for Afghan personnel, improving their safety each and every day.’

The Navistar MTV is already in service in Afghanistan in a variety of key missions including general troop transport, water tankers, fuel trucks, recovery vehicles and cargo trucks. Deliveries of the vehicles will continue through July.

buglerbilly
19-04-13, 10:12 AM
Oshkosh FMTV deliveries reach new milestone

19 April 2013 - 8:38 by the Shephard News Team



Oshkosh Defense has reached a new milestone in its Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) truck programme, having recently delivered the 15,000th vehicle to the US Army and National Guard.

Since being awarded the FMTV contract in 2010 by the US Army, Oshkosh has delivered more than 21,000 FMTV trucks and trailers, including the FMTV Wrecker with its tested retrieval system. The FMTV is used for tactical and combat operations, relief efforts, and unit resupply missions.

The Oshkosh FMTV is a series of 17 models and 23 configurations ranging from 2.5-ton to 10-ton payloads. The vehicles feature crew-protecting armour and advanced technologies to provide the capability, versatility, mobility and protection to move troops and supplies, recover vehicles and weapon systems, or haul equipment wherever the mission requires. Commonality of parts of over 80 percent across chassis variants optimises logistics efficiency and reduces operational costs. The Long-Term Armour Strategy-compliant cab and other advanced technologies give military personnel the enhanced protection they need to confidently complete their missions.

John Bryant, senior vice president of defense programs for Oshkosh Defense, said: ‘The FMTV programme is exemplary of the quality and value that Oshkosh provides to our military customers across all of our operations. Our team has worked in harmony with the army’s goals and schedule from the onset to produce and deliver a vehicle with Oshkosh quality and performance, which provides soldiers with greater confidence as they perform their missions.’

The five-year FMTV requirements contract for the production of trucks and trailers, as well as support services and training, runs through fiscal year 2014.

buglerbilly
25-04-13, 12:20 AM
U.S. SOCOM Kicks Off Two New Vehicle Programs

Apr. 24, 2013 - 04:09PM

By PAUL McLEARY



WASHINGTON — Next month, U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) is scheduled to award a contract to one company for at least 1,300 ground mobility vehicles (GMVs) to replace its current fleet of aging GMVs.

SOCOM commander Adm. William McRaven confirmed the planned award while warning about his command’s spending on research and development during a hearing of the House Armed Services’ intelligence, emerging threats and capabilities subcommittee on April 17.

The GMV program is the planned replacement for the heavier Humvee variant being used by SOCOM, and according to budget documents released in April, they would start being fielded next year.

SOCOM’s fiscal 2014 budget request submitted April 10 calls for $24.7 million to purchase 101 vehicles in the coming year at $245,000 per vehicle. The three companies competing for the work, which is expected to produce about 200 vehicles a year for seven years, are General Dynamics, current GMV-maker AM General and Navistar International.

Requirements documents released last year call for a vehicle that weighs less than 7,000 pounds, has the ability to carry up to seven passengers and can be transportable in an M/CH-47 Chinook helicopter.

On April 5, SOCOM also released a request for proposal for what it is calling an internally transportable vehicle (ITV), which will be designed to fit in the back of a V-22 Osprey. While the specifications are classified, a draft solicitation released in June revealed that any submission must include two “critical flight mission payloads,” one at 1,000 pounds and another at 2,000 pounds, with a field-installable weapon station mount capable of fitting the M2 .50-caliber machine gun, the M240, the M249 squad automatic weapon, the MK-19 and the MK-47 Grenade Launcher.

SOCOM also requires the ITV to fit two passengers in addition to a driver, feature a removable gunner’s seat, be able to carry three to six casualty litters and have a crush-resistant roll cage.

SOCOM wants designs capable of traveling 350 to 450 miles “at 45 mph on level paved roads using organic fuel tank(s), without refuel, and exclusive of onboard fuel storage cans,” while reaching top speeds of 65 to 75 mph.

Given the advanced electronic jamming and communication technologies that modern spec ops forces employ in austere environments, SOCOM requires that any submission be able to produce continuous electrical power — even with the engine off — to operate a manpack radio for four to 12 hours.

Even with these initiatives and several other big-ticket developmental items outlined in the 2014 budget, such as the $20 million requested to kick off a Precision Strike Package Large Caliber Gun program, which would build an upgraded version of the Precision Strike Package on AC-130J gunships, McRaven told lawmakers that his command’s research-and-development budget “is a little out of balance.” After 12 years of focus on readiness as a combat force, “our research ... has waned a little bit.”

McRaven said even though SOCOM takes up only 1.7 percent of the total Defense Department budget, “my expectation is that we will take some cuts” in coming years.

buglerbilly
26-04-13, 03:55 PM
Denmark Orders Heavy Tactical Recovery Vehicles from RMMV

(Source: Rheinmetall AG; issued April 26, 2013)



Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles (RMMV) is supplying the Danish armed forces with 14 heavyweight protected recovery vehicles.

Weighing some 36 tons, the Heavy Tactical Recovery Vehicle (HTRV) is based on the tried-and-tested RMMV SX45 8x8 chassis, combining extreme stability, safety and crew comfort with outstanding manoeuvrability, whether on the road or in the toughest terrain.

Thanks to its integrated Miller recovery module, the RMMV HTVR is able to recover heavy disabled vehicles weighing up to 40 tons or containers weighing up to 17 tons – quickly and safely, even under the most extreme conditions. The RMMV HTRV thus ideally complements the array of equipment fielded by modern armies: many of the tactical and logistical vehicles with protective modules used in deployed operations today have become heavier, making a high-performance recovery capacity imperative.

Level 3/3 ballistic and anti-mine protection keep the crew safe from small arms fire and IED blasts.

The recovery module of the RMMV HTRV is made by the US company Miller Industries Towing Equipment Inc. of Ooltewah, Tennessee. Miller is the global leader in recovery vehicles. The RMMV HTRV is equipped with a heavy rotator recovery and lifting crane with an output of 75 mt, together with two independently controllable Rotzler HZ090 winches and a Rotzler TR200 main recovery winch with 30-ton tractive force. It also features various mission-specific items of equipment. Integration of the Miller recovery module will take place at MAN Trucks Bus in Denmark, thus constituting a 100% offset transaction.

The Danish armed forces will be the first on the European mainland to introduce the RMMV HTRV. Denmark already has a number of tactical and logistical vehicles from the company’s HX and SX families in its inventory.

Delivery begins in the first quarter of 2014, and is scheduled to conclude in the second quarter of 2015.

-ends-

buglerbilly
30-04-13, 11:09 AM
Artis declares Iron Curtain APS ready for deployment

30 April 2013 - 9:05 by the Shephard News Team



Artis has announced that its Iron Curtain active protection system (APS) has successfully defeated all threats during recent US government testing. The APS was integrated with a combat vehicle by BAE Systems as a system demonstrator for the tests.

Iron Curtain protects military vehicles and other assets by intercepting threats such as rocket-propelled grenades (RPG) inches from the vehicle and rendering them inert, even if the threat was fired from extremely close range. Iron Curtain uses two independent sensors, radar (developed by Mustang Technology Group) and optical, high-speed computing, and tightly controlled countermunitions to minimise the false alarm rate and provide extraordinary system effectiveness and reliability.

Keith Brendley, CEO, Artis, commented: ‘After this latest round, where the system hit and killed 100 percent of the shots in a very demanding test series, the only rational conclusion is that the system simply works. We proved not only that Iron Curtain defeats threats and saves lives, but the risk from collateral damage is minimal, especially when compared with the alternative.’

Although there is currently no active programme within the US military to acquire an APS for ground vehicles, the threat to personnel from RPGs and similar remains. These latest tests have reinforced Artis’ position that the system is ready for deployment.

‘In addition to these compelling test results, Iron Curtain has an approved safety architecture as unanimously recommended by the Joint Services Weapons Safety Review Board. These accomplishments along with our cost studies show that this system is affordable and ready to integrate today,’ Brendley said.

Mark Signorelli, vice president and general manager of weapon systems, BAE Systems, added: ‘We evaluated many active protection systems. Iron Curtain was selected because of its test history, maturity, robust capability against many types of threats, and safety to personnel outside the vehicle. Clearly, the outstanding result from these tests vindicates our decision. The BAE protection systems team picked the best APS in the market, and then did an excellent job in integrating it with our platform.’

buglerbilly
01-05-13, 10:41 PM
David Cameron: we will look at armoured vehicles after Afghanistan deaths

David Cameron will look carefully at the use of Mastiff armoured cars in Afghanistan after three British soldiers were killed in one of the protected vehicles.


Mastif armoured vehicles belonging to the British Army Photo: JULIAN SIMMONDS

By Rowena Mason, and Melanie Hall

11:34AM BST 01 May 2013

NOTHING is impervious IF the bomb is big enough................

The Prime Minister promised to re-assess the safety of the vehicles, which he once described as the "best-known protections" against bombs.

Speaking on the BBC's World at One, he said the armoured patrol cars have a "pretty good record of withstanding blasts from IEDs [improvised explosive devices]".

However, there are fears the Taliban have found a way of overcoming the Britain’s best-protected armoured vehicle.

"We’ll want to look at that carefully," he said. "We have done an enormous amount to improve the quality and quantity of protective vehicles that they use, that our soldiers use out in Afghanistan and this particular as I understand it had a pretty good record of withstanding blasts from IEDs, so I’m sure we’ll want to look at that carefully and put in place everything we can to make sure that our brave men and women have the best protective equipment they have."

Earlier, Mr Cameron said Britain has "paid a very high price for the work we're doing in Afghanistan".

"It is important work because it's vital that country doesn't again become a haven for terrorists, terrorists that can threaten us here in the UK," he told ITV's Daybreak. "But today our thoughts should be with the families and friends of those that have suffered."

The three soldiers were killed while travelling in a Mastiff armoured patrol vehicle, after it was struck by an improvised explosive device in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand province.

It is the first time British soldiers have been killed while travelling in a Mastiff armoured vehicle, the Ministry of Defence said today.

The £1 million Mastiff is widely used by the British Army in Afghanistan, with around 180 in service. It is favoured by troops because it is regarded as being highly resistant to mines and roadside bombs.

Lord Dannatt, the former Army chief of staff, said: "The Taliban have found a way of countering the protective qualities and characteristics of the Mastiff.

"It would seem that this was an extremely large bomb that was so powerful that actually it was able to cause fatalities within the vehicle itself," he told BBC Radio 4.

"I've not seen a technical report but my understanding in talking to the Ministry of Defence is that in all probability it was a very large device in terms of the amount of explosive and it may well have physically lifted up the vehicle and possibly even turned it over."

He added: "One has to accept tragically that, as in any cycle of conflict, there's invention and counter-invention.”

Nick Clegg, the Deputy Prime Minister, has called for a review into the protection offered by the Mastiff.

Mr Clegg said: "It shows that, even with some of the best equipment in the world, and we have provided a lot of significant protection for our forces, you are dealing with a very ruthless enemy in the Taliban.

"They have at their disposal explosive devices which can even do damage to our soldiers in those protected vehicles," he told LBC Radio.

The Ministry of Defence would not say whether the device had broken through the Mastiff's armour or simply turned it over.

A spokesman said: “It is wrong to suppose the men died because the bomb penetrated the vehicle. They could have died because it rolled over.

“If a man is sticking out of the top, half in, half out the vehicle and it rolls, chances are that man will be seriously injured or die. If you have an explosion that’s big enough to lift a vehicle and roll it, you always have the possibility that it will lift and [soldiers will be] killed.”

He added: “You can never armour a vehicle enough to withstand every kind of blast you can have. There is no way you can protect everyone, all of the time. To armour a vehicle from any blast would take 200 tonnes of armour.”

Mastiffs have been in service since 2007. The heavily armoured, six-wheel drive patrol vehicle was ordered for urgent use in Afghanistan and Iraq in August 2006 because of high numbers of casualties amongst soldiers travelling in the Cold War-era Warrior armoured vehicle and the soft-sided Snatch Land Rover.

It is based on the US Cougar vehicle, built by Force Protection, and carries a roof-mounted machine gun, Bowman radios and electronic counter-measures. It has a top speed of 90kph and can carry eight passengers.

The soldiers were from the Royal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, based in Penicuik, Midlothian. They deployed to Afghanistan in March and were on a routine patrol.

It is the highest single loss of British lives in the country since the deaths of six soldiers travelling in a Warrior armoured vehicle in March last year.

buglerbilly
15-05-13, 02:20 PM
New Trucks for Defence Force

(Source: New Zealand Ministry of Defence; issued May 15, 2013)


Hon Dr Jonathan Coleman talks to Major Ange Sutton. Photos: NZDF.

Defence Minister Dr Jonathan Coleman today announced the purchase of 200 new trucks for the New Zealand Defence Force.

In a $135 million project, the government is purchasing Rheinmetall-MAN military vehicles to replace the old NZDF Unimog and heavier Mercedes trucks.

“The new NZDF medium and heavy trucks will carry more people and equipment, and will be fitted with armour and weapons to protect the crew, allowing them to function effectively in modern military environments,” said Dr Coleman.

“The same military vehicles are being purchased by the United Kingdom and we have bought them at a great price by purchasing off the same production line as the Brits, achieving an economy of scale.”

“The total cost for the trucks from the production line is $113 million. The remaining balance of the project costs includes armour protection kits; weapons mounts; personnel modules and a range of specialised military equipment,” he said. “It also covers spares, logistic support arrangements, and extensive training packages.”

“The arrival of all the new trucks by the end of 2014 will mean the NZDF can begin working up to a future operational capability which will be a huge step forward in technology and protection from the current fleet.”

“The government’s defence policy is all about investment in the front line and these new trucks are a great example of that,” said Dr Coleman.

“These new trucks are part of an ongoing programme of equipment upgrades, including modernisation of the ANZAC frigates, replacement helicopters for the Navy, and getting our upgraded Orions and Hercules fully into service.”

Key Facts

• The trucks will be used across the whole NZDF.
• Three sizes of truck will be purchased: 6 tonne 4x4, 9 tonne 6x6 and 15 tonne 8x8.
• The 6 tonne trucks have 240Kw engines, while the 6x6 and 8x8 variants have 324Kw engines. All engines are Euro 4 emissions compliant, which is the highest level that still allows efficient operations even if the fuel is of lower quality (such as might be found on operations).
• All trucks are fitted with high capacity electrical systems to future proof them for developments in communications and other electronic systems. They are all fitted with air conditioning to maximise crew efficiency in a wide range of temperatures..
• Variants to be purchased include trucks fitted with winches and cranes to allow completely independent operations, dump trucks, trucks fitted with specialised pallet and container handling equipment, and tractor/semi-trailer combinations to carry heavy vehicles and equipment.
• Specific components, including semi-trailers and dumper bodies, will be made in New Zealand.
• Although the trucks meet military requirements, over 80% of their components are used by civilian MAN vehicles. This commonality will allow for readily available maintenance support to the vehicles.
• Five training vehicles are arriving soon and will allow drivers and mechanics to train and qualify on the vehicles prior to the main fleet arriving.



-ends-

buglerbilly
16-05-13, 01:13 PM
AND our MAN trucks are where?

Wolftrap
16-05-13, 04:23 PM
AND our MAN trucks are where?

Is that a rhetorical question?

buglerbilly
16-05-13, 08:24 PM
Jawohl! Also a hint of sarcasm...............

buglerbilly
17-05-13, 10:57 AM
Via Soldier Systems blog.............

SOFIC – Dillon Defender

May 16th, 2013



Dillon Aero, makers of the M134 mini gun displayed their take on the classic LR Defender. Based on a 110 chassis, the Dillon Defender is a concept vehicle. They currently have 6 in various states of refurbishment.



Yes, those are ammo boxes in the rear bumper.



www.dillonaero.com

buglerbilly
22-05-13, 11:01 AM
Boeing unveils Phantom Badger

22 May 2013 - 0:02 by Tony Skinner in St Louis



Interesting vehicle, ferked name! :doh

Boeing has unveiled a new ground tactical vehicle designed to be internally transported in a V-22 Osprey tiltrotor to meet a US special forces’ requirement for a highly mobile, V-22 Internally Transportable Vehicle (ITV).

Unveiled to reporters for the first time at Phantom Works near St Louis on 21 May, the new ‘Phantom Badger’ vehicle has been developed using the expertise of MSI Defense Solutions, which employed vehicle technologies originally developed for NASCAR racing.

Designed by the Special Pursuits Cell at Boeing Phantom Works, the Phantom Badger is Boeing’s proposal for a US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) request for proposal for a V-22 ITV, with a selection expected to be made by the end of the year.

Phantom Works programme manager for combat support vehicles, John Chicoli, said the vehicle addressed a gap for a vehicle that was able to be internally transported in a V-22 but which provided greater levels of protection and comfort than a smaller ATV.

‘There is a gap out there. This is a real tactical vehicle and doesn’t look like an ATV at all,’ Chicoli noted. ‘This features a high use of COTS and we have done a lot of work with special operation warfighters to look at what they require from a tactical vehicle.’

Boeing recently submitted its proposal for the SOCOM V-22 ITV requirement, which initially seeks two vehicles each with the ability to purchase eight additional units for testing.

The Phantom Badger has undergone testing at Fort Bragg and the Nevada Automotive Testing Center, with Chicoli claiming it features Humvee levels of mobility.

However, due to the nature of the requirement, and given that a number of companies are expected to respond to this latest RfP, Boeing was unwilling to disclose specific vehicle specifications such as speed, range, fuel capacity or weight.

The vehicle features four wheel steering, enhanced shocks and suspension developed by MSI, and mission-specific modules fitted behind the front two seats. These can be changed within 30 minutes, allowing special forces operators to quickly re-role the vehicle.

The vehicle can be loaded mission-ready onto a V-22 with 6 inches of space on each side.

While the prototype vehicle features a carbon fibre hood, Boeing has since decided this has been ‘over-engineered’ and has moved instead to fibre glass. Boeing claims Phantom Badger is relatively comfortable for a vehicle of this kind, allowing troops to stay fresh during the ride.

Wolftrap
23-05-13, 07:17 PM
Boeing unveils Phantom BadgerInteresting vehicle, ferked name! :doh

Yep! And ... a vehicle by ?Boeing? For some reason the Phantom Badger somewhat reminds me of an Oshkosh M-ATV that was washed a little too hot.

buglerbilly
24-05-13, 11:55 AM
Ricardo project proves vehicle fuel economy

24 May 2013 - 8:08 by the Shephard News Team



A Fuel-Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator (FED) engineered by Ricardo has proven to dramatically lower fuel consumption in military vehicles following two years of on-the-ground testing.

The FED project was developed as a ‘clean sheet’ with a Ricardo-led team that included personnel from the US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) working alongside top industry suppliers. The programme aims to lower US oil dependence by developing innovative fuel economy technologies.

The demonstrator was designed with a supercharged Cummins I4 engine, low-rolling resistance Goodyear tyres, and an Alcoa Defense developed aluminium structure.

The FED has been undergoing testing at the US Army’s Aberdeen Proving Grounds over the past 19 months.

An analysis has now shown that compared to the US military’s regularly outfitted M1151 HMMWV, the FED experienced a 72 percent improvement in fuel economy. The FED’s performance was assessed using a number of realistic duty cycles including highway, off-road and idle conditions.

As well as improved fuel economy, driving tests prove significantly improved acceleration over the current vehicle, even when loaded to nearly seven tons.

Wesley Scharmen, Ricardo chief engineer on the project, said: ‘We implemented a relatively conservative approach using near or in-market technology to reach our fuel economy objectives, and we have proven they are achievable. This kept costs down and increased the production feasibility of the end product.’

Carl Johnson, TARDEC’s team lead for FED, added: ‘The team took a total-vehicle approach to improving fuel economy. And they did it using proven technology. When government and industry teams work together the results can be substantial. A 72 percent increase in fuel economy provides us with a significant competitive advantage in the field.’

With fuel being the second most delivered commodity to ground troops, right behind water, the FED has important implications for reducing fuel consumption in the field, along with improving military vehicle technology.

Tom Apostolos, president of Ricardo’s US subsidiary, Ricardo Inc, said: ‘The FED offers an extremely valuable template for future defence vehicle development. It sets the stage for cost-effective, high-performing, fuel-efficient vehicles that enable US forces to fulfil their combat roles in the smartest way possible.’

buglerbilly
24-05-13, 11:26 PM
More on this...........

Ricardo-led Technology Demonstrator Delivers 72 Percent Improved Fuel Economy

(Source: Ricardo; issued May 23, 2013)

Analysis of defense vehicle project proves techniques for reducing fuel consumption – after two years of on-the-ground testing the Ricardo-engineered Fuel-Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator (FED) has proven to be as good as the simulation models projected.

The analysis released today proves that when compared to the US military’s regularly outfitted M1151 HMMWV, the FED experienced a 72 percent improvement in fuel economy. The FED’s performance was assessed using a number of realistic duty cycles including highway, off-road and idle conditions.

“We implemented a relatively conservative approach using near or in-market technology to reach our fuel economy objectives, and we have proven they are achievable,” said Wesley Scharmen, Ricardo chief engineer on the project. “This kept costs down and increased the production feasibility of the end product.”

The FED uses a supercharged Cummins I4 engine, low-rolling resistance Goodyear tyres, an Alcoa Defense developed aluminium structure and other driveline improvements from Ricardo. The project was developed as a ‘clean sheet’ with a Ricardo-led team that included personnel from the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) working alongside top industry suppliers.

The FED was built at Ricardo’s Detroit facility in 2011 and later displayed at the Pentagon. For the last 19 months, it has been undergoing testing at the U.S. Army’s Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland and other locations. Not only does the FED deliver outstanding fuel economy numbers, but the vehicle boasts better performance, as well. Driving tests prove significantly improved acceleration over the current vehicle, even when loaded to nearly seven tons.

“The team took a total-vehicle approach to improving fuel economy,” said Carl Johnson, TARDEC’s team lead for FED. “And they did it using proven technology. When government and industry teams work together the results can be substantial. A 72 percent increase in fuel economy provides us with a significant competitive advantage in the field.”

That’s because fuel is the second most delivered commodity to ground troops, right behind water. Reducing fuel consumption, along with improving military vehicle technology and lowering the nation’s oil dependence is the FED program’s goal.

In addition to boosting fuel economy and performance, the FED helped validate Ricardo’s simulation capabilities.

“Ricardo’s forecasting technology projected precisely what we experienced in our real-world capability studies,” said Johnson. “The data was right on the money. Moreover, the Ricardo–led team has helped us to develop a FED capable of becoming a credible military vehicle.”

“The FED offers an extremely valuable template for future defence vehicle development,” said Tom Apostolos, president of Ricardo’s US subsidiary, Ricardo Inc. “It sets the stage for cost-effective, high-performing, fuel-efficient vehicles that enable U.S. forces to fulfill their combat roles in the smartest way possible.”

-ends

Wolftrap
25-05-13, 11:22 AM
I'd like to know the criteria on how they got to that 72%. Either way, Ricardo is doing quiet well in terms of reputation don't they! After all ... it was quiet an astounding evolution that former Force Protection showed from their first 4x4 vehicles ...



... to this one here ...

buglerbilly
29-05-13, 03:06 PM
Hawkei Vehicles Delivered On Schedule

(Source: Thales Australia; issued May 29, 2013)



Thales Australia has delivered a further two Hawkei vehicles to the Defence Materiel Organisation on schedule.

The handover of the two Reconnaissance variants under Stage 2 of the Manufactured and Supported in Australia option of Land 121 Phase 4 means that all six vehicles are now with the Department of Defence for testing. All vehicle delivery milestones have been met on schedule.

The six vehicles comprise two Command variants, two Utility variants and two Reconnaissance variants, plus a trailer.

The majority of the evaluation process is being undertaken by the Commonwealth at Monegeetta in Victoria, and includes survivability testing, communications system integration testing, electro-magnetic interference/compatibility testing, reliability growth trials and user assessments.

Vehicles already delivered have so far completed almost half of the planned 100,000km of testing scheduled for the evaluation period. Subject to successful testing of the vehicles, final approval of the project is expected circa 2015, as detailed in the 2012 Defence Capability Plan.

Thales Australia CEO Chris Jenkins said: “We are very pleased to deliver these final two vehicles to Defence on schedule. They are backed by the expertise of our protected mobility engineering teams, and we are working closely with Defence to support the testing and evaluation process.”

“We have invested $30 million in Hawkei, and Australian industry has also put significant effort into the development of these vehicles. I’d like to thank all the companies in the supply chain who have helped us meet this important milestone.”

The Hawkei is manufactured at Thales’s Bendigo facility in Victoria. Employing 200 people, Bendigo is also home of the Bushmaster vehicle that has proven very successful on Australian Defence Force operations overseas.

LAND 121 Phase 4 is a Department of Defence project that seeks to provide up to 1,300 protected light vehicles.

Thales is a global technology leader for the Defence & Security and the Aerospace & Transport markets. In 2012, the company generated revenues of €14.2 billion (equivalent of AUD 17.6 billion) with 67,000 employees in 56 countries.

Thales Australia is a trusted partner of the Australian Defence Force and is also present in commercial sectors ranging from air traffic management to security systems and services. Employing around 3,300 people in over 35 sites across the country, Thales Australia recorded revenues of AUD 1 billion in 2012.

-ends-

buglerbilly
29-05-13, 03:21 PM
MRAPs: Too Much Now, Too Late Then

By Mark ThompsonMay 29, 20130


The first wave of MRAPs arrived in Iraq in 2007.

I'd have thought this an excellent opportunity to gift a bunch to Allies that may take them as well as the "new" war-zone in Africa, where some MRAP's may be well suited to some Savannah areas in particular........

Earlier this month, the Marines said they wouldn’t be needing all the Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected vehicles the corps bought for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. In fact, they only want to hold on to 1,200 of the 4,000 heavily-armored behemoths they have. “It is a rather unique vehicle and it does have some limitations on it,” Marine Lieut. General Richard Mills said May 14.

Now comes the Army, which says it wants to hang on to only 8,000 of the 21,000 MRAPs it procured for the two conflicts. It plans to keep 4,000 in operational Army units, with a second 4,000 held in reserve “in case we need them for other contingencies,” General Ray Odierno, the Army chief of staff, said last Wednesday.

At a cost of up to $1 million each, that works out to some $15 billion in excess armor.

It’s easy to deride the investment in hindsight, as Battleland’s Alex Rogers reported last fall. But that wasn’t the case back in 2007 when then-defense secretary Robert Gates ordered them built lickety-split – with many flown direct from factory to battlefield – to protect U.S. troops from the growing threat posed by improvised explosive devices in both wars.

“We think it’s the best use of what’s left of our MRAP fleet,” Odierno told a Senate panel. “We can’t afford to sustain 21,000 MRAPs because it would be in addition to all the other equipment that we have to sustain.” He added that he wanted “to thank Congress for everything they did to get” MRAPs to the war zones “so quickly.”

Just not quickly enough for the Odierno family. In 2004, son Tony, an Army lieutenant, was riding along Baghdad’s dangerous Airport Road when a rocket-propelled grenade shredded his door on a less-heavily armored Humvee. The lack of protection cost him his left arm – and his driver his life.

Read more: http://nation.time.com/2013/05/29/mraps-too-much-now-too-late-then/#ixzz2UgvTTYHW

Wolftrap
29-05-13, 04:30 PM
Agreed - though the article doesn't quote what exactly they do with the surplus vehicles. So that option might still be around. On the other hand, if the US offers some 1.000 to 2.000 MRAP's internationally for a dime, that would obliterate any new vehicle sales US defence companies are after abroad. In times of sequestation, even a slight risk of this happening might make some lobbyist be alert.

buglerbilly
30-05-13, 02:18 PM
Oshkosh Defense Presents Array of Vehicle and Sustainment Solutions for Canadian DND Modernization Programmes

(Source: Oshkosh Defense; dated May 28, 2013)



OTTAWA, Ontario --- As the backbone of the Canadian Army’s logistics fleet reaches the end of its service life, vehicle modernization programmes such as the Medium Support Vehicle System (MSVS) Standard Military Pattern (SMP) will help restore the capabilities and protection that troops need to fulfil their missions.

At CANSEC 2013 in Ottawa, Ontario, Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, will present a full range of advanced vehicle platforms and life-cycle sustainment solutions for Canadian Forces.

“Oshkosh Defense is committed to supporting the Canadian Department of National Defence and ensuring that troops have the survivable and technologically advanced vehicles they so urgently need,” said Serge Buchakjian, senior vice president and general manager of International Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “The Canadian government is actively pursuing its strategy to modernize its tactical vehicle fleet, and we intend to provide a compelling solution including advanced vehicles, complete life-cycle support services and measurable economic benefits by leveraging a nationwide network of partners and suppliers.”

The Oshkosh MSVS SMP solution is designed to improve the protection and performance capabilities of the Canadian Forces’ medium-payload fleet, both today and for decades to come. The Oshkosh MSVS SMP vehicle was specifically designed to meet the Canadian program requirements with advanced features, including a high-performance drive train, as well as advanced suspension, braking and armour protection systems. The MSVS SMP from Oshkosh has accumulated more than one billion real-word operational kilometres in a full range of missions around the globe.



Oshkosh will display the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) A4 at CANSEC along with the Oshkosh Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) and the Oshkosh Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) 5-ton wrecker.

As the DND fields its new MSVS fleet, training will be critical to operational readiness and safety. At CANSEC, Oshkosh Defense also will demonstrate its latest module of the Oshkosh Virtual Trainer for the HEMTT load handling system (LHS). Oshkosh currently provides a multi-faceted training curriculum including classroom, hands-on and virtual training for military vehicle operators and service professionals. Oshkosh virtual training provides a 20 percent or more cost savings compared to a traditional classroom-only approach. Additionally, students are able to demonstrate skill proficiency in the virtual environment before performing tasks on the actual vehicle, where more risks are involved.

-ends-

buglerbilly
30-05-13, 02:22 PM
Oshkosh Debuts Future of Light Tactical Vehicles at CANSEC 2013

(Source: Oshkosh Defense; issued May 29, 2013)



OTTAWA, Ontario --- Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, is showcasing the Oshkosh Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) – the future of light tactical vehicles – for the first time in Canada at the CANSEC 2013 defence exhibition in Ottawa, Ontario. The L-ATV aims to replace aging Light Utility Vehicle, Wheeled (LUVW) and special operations vehicle fleets and give troops greater off-road mobility, protection, speed and transportability capabilities.

“Military threats, tactics and environments are changing at unprecedented speeds,” said John Urias, Oshkosh Corporation executive vice president and president of Oshkosh Defense. “Our L-ATV platform leverages the latest automotive technologies and vast military experience to give troops next-generation levels of mobility, protection and operational flexibility for missions both at home and abroad. We believe this vehicle represents the future of light tactical vehicles and are excited to share this cutting edge solution in Canada.”

The Oshkosh L-ATV offers an advanced crew protection system proven to optimize crew survivability. The platform can accept multiple armour configurations, which allows the vehicle to adapt easily to changing operational requirements. The L-ATV also applies the Oshkosh TAK-4i™ intelligent independent-suspension system to provide significantly faster speeds when operating off-road, which can be critical to troops' safety.

The U.S. Army and Marine Corps selected the Oshkosh L-ATV in August 2012 as one of three vehicles to be evaluated in the Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programme, which focuses on replacing the HMMWV fleet. As part of the JLTV programme, Oshkosh will deliver 22 L-ATVs in August 2013 for U.S. Government testing and evaluation.

Also at CANSEC, the company will be displaying the Oshkosh Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) A4 Light Equipment Transporter and the Oshkosh Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) 5-ton wrecker, as well as demonstrating a new module of the Oshkosh Virtual Trainer for the HEMTT Load Handling System (LHS).

Oshkosh Defense leadership will be available at CANSEC to discuss the company’s commitment to Canada, as well its full range of vehicle, technology and service offerings, at indoor booth #1001 in The Ernst & Young Centre (formerly the CE Centre) and outdoor booth #2029 today through May 30.

Oshkosh Defense is a leading provider of tactical wheeled vehicles and life cycle sustainment services. For more than 90 years, Oshkosh has been mobilizing military and security forces around the globe by offering a full portfolio of heavy, medium, light and highly protected military vehicles to support our customers’ missions.

-ends-

buglerbilly
03-06-13, 11:42 AM
USMC Selects Oshkosh for Next-Gen Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting Vehicle

Oshkosh P-19R leverages companyaEUR(tm)s extensive military and firefighting vehicle experience



The U.S. Marine Corps has selected Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE:OSK), to deliver its new fleet of P-19 Replacement Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) vehicles. The Oshkosh P-19R will be the Marines’ first-response vehicle in aircraft fire emergencies at military bases and expeditionary airfields. This next-generation vehicle will provide more advanced on-road and off-road firefighting capabilities to Marines and replace their current fleet of Oshkosh P-19 ARFF vehicles as the vehicles reach the end of their service lives.

“Oshkosh has been supporting the P-19 ARFF fleet for more than 30 years, and we are honored that the U.S. Marine Corps has selected Oshkosh to provide a new generation of emergency response capabilities,” said John Urias, Oshkosh Corporation executive vice president and president of Oshkosh Defense. “Oshkosh leveraged product and engineering expertise from both our Defense and Airport Products teams to respond to the P-19R solicitation. The Oshkosh P-19R delivers a modern, expeditionary platform with advanced firefighting capabilities for the highly volatile situations Marines might face.”

The Oshkosh P-19R is based on the proven Oshkosh Logistics Vehicle System Replacement (LVSR) platform – which is currently supporting the Marine Corps’ off-road, heavy-payload missions across the globe – and the technologically advanced Striker® firefighting systems from Oshkosh Airport Products. The Oshkosh P-19R uses the Oshkosh TAK-4® independent suspension system to deliver exceptional mobility for off-runway response situations, and the Command Zone™ integrated diagnostics and automation system to increase the crew’s situational awareness and help them carry out firefighting missions.

The Oshkosh Airport Products Group is the industry-leading ARFF vehicle producer, with vehicles in operation at more than 70 countries around the world. Oshkosh began manufacturing the MB-5 ARFF vehicle for the U.S. Navy in the 1960s as well as the military’s P-19 in the 1980s. Today, the Oshkosh Striker ARFF vehicle is used by the U.S. military and at airports around the world. Oshkosh developed its Striker ARFF models with input and feedback from firefighters to provide the wide range of safety, reliability and performance capabilities they need.

Oshkosh Defense’s Integrated Product Support capabilities already are in place to deliver organic life-cycle sustainment support, including training, part supply and in-theater support. Additionally, the Oshkosh P-19R features commonality with other fielded Oshkosh vehicles to reduce sustainment costs, minimize provisioning and inventory requirements, and increase training efficiencies.

The P-19R ARFF vehicles, support and sustainment contract was awarded to Oshkosh Defense by the U.S. Marine Corps Systems Command. The total estimated contract value is $192 million. Work will be performed by Oshkosh beginning in June 2013 and is expected to be completed by May 2018.

Source : Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE: OSK)

Published on ASDNews: Jun 3, 2013

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-49356/USMC_Selects_Oshkosh_for_Next-Gen_Aircraft_Rescue_Fire_Fighting_Vehicle.htm#ixzz 2V9GyzBHQ

buglerbilly
08-06-13, 01:15 AM
The latest Zibar variant that arrived straight from the workshop is the Z-COM an all terrain vehicle designed for special operations. Powered by a Rotax BRP engine, accelerating the Z-COM to an offroad speed of 130 km/h, and range of over 400 km. The vehicle has a curb weight of only 750 kg, meaning it Z-COM can currently carry six fully equipped soldiers plus payload at a total weight of 800 kg. According to Ido Cohen, the vehicle designer and builder, Z-COM will soon be able to increase the payload capacity by more than 50 percent, bringing the vehicle to a two-ton GVW category. What makes this vehicle unique are its small dimensions and flexible deployment. Z-COM is designed with foldable flatbed and forward load surface, and collapsing roll cage, squeezing the fit snugly inside the V-22!. Three can be packed into the cargo bay of a CH-53 helicopter. The vehicle is currently competing for a new US Special Operations Command requirement for V-22 internally transported vehicles (ITV).

buglerbilly
11-06-13, 02:23 PM
AM General's BRV-O JLTV Rolls Down Production Line and Into Key Government Testing

(Source: AM General; issued June 10, 2013)



SOUTH BEND, Ind. --- AM General's Light Tactical Vehicle Assembly Line (LTVAL) is full of activity as the company's Blast Resistant Vehicle - Off road (BRV-O) steadily moves through the production line and on to Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) government testing.

The company's experienced workforce, many of whom work on this active line, has produced approximately 300,000 of the company's iconic High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) for all branches of the U.S. military, as well as the armed services of more than 50 other countries.

The new BRV-O represents more than a decade of AM General investment in research, development and testing for this next-generation vehicle for the U.S. Army and Marine Corps. In August 2012, the company's independent proposal for JLTV was selected for a $64.5 million Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase contract.

As one of three competitors, AM General is building 22 BRV-Os for delivery in August and subsequent government testing in the EMD phase. These will include a 4-seat variant Combat Tactical Vehicle that supports three different mission package configurations and a 2-seat variant Combat Support Vehicle that supports a utility mission package configuration for different mission roles across the full spectrum of military operations.

"We are setting the pace on integrating components, meeting timelines and other requirements and working closely with our military customer representatives daily," said AM General Vice President of Business Development and Program Management Chris Vanslager. "Light tactical vehicles are in our DNA, and it shows in the focus, excitement and pride all along the assembly line. Low risk, high quality and affordability is what our customer demands and we at AM General have more than five decades of experience and a more than 1.5 million light tactical vehicle heritage to back it up."

He noted that AM General's highly skilled workers know light military trucks from decades of experience. They actively contribute to production engineering, continuous product improvements, and what is among the highest build-quality indices in the industry. A measure of the high quality level of the product engineering and manufacturing was recently displayed when the weight of the first eight BRV-O vehicles validated the design weight.

AM General's Military Assembly Plant is dedicated to light tactical vehicles and is capable of producing different vehicles, models, configurations and paint schemes at the same time. It often has done so in manufacturing HMMWVs for U.S. and foreign military customers while earning a record of delivering reliable and versatile vehicles on time and on budget.

As the BRV-O JLTVs leave the LTVAL at the Military Assembly Plant, they will receive additional "mission packages" some provided by AM General and others as Government Furnished Equipment (GFE), to convert each base vehicle into a specific mission package configuration such as the Heavy Guns Carrier. Then each vehicle undergoes AM General break-in and shake-down testing before delivery to the military.

Over its long history, AM General has produced more than 1.5 million light tactical vehicles in defense of this country's freedom – far more than any other American company. BRV-O features a crew capsule of modular armor design currently undergoing government blast testing. The BRV-O design can be readily adapted to future changes in U.S. military missions, enemy threats and new protection technologies as they emerge. BRV-O also features AM General's lightweight, fuel efficient and high performance engine and transmission powertrain; a self-leveling suspension system; a C4ISR backbone with open-standard networked architecture and clustered super-computing power; and other advanced components.

AM General designs, engineers, manufactures, supplies and supports specialized vehicles for military and commercial customers worldwide. AM General has more than five decades of experience meeting the changing needs of the defense and automotive industries, supported by its employees at major facilities in Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio, and a strong supplier base that stretches across 43 states.

-ends-

buglerbilly
17-06-13, 11:47 AM
Oshkosh Demos JLTV Prototypes for US DoD and Congressional Leadership

Oshkosh vehicles exhibit next-generation performance on military severe off-road track designed to represent battlefield terrain



Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE:OSK), successfully demonstrated its Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) prototypes at an event hosted by the U.S. JLTV Joint Program Office in Quantico, VA. During the demonstration, the Oshkosh JLTV prototypes completed the military’s severe off-road track (SORT) without fail, allowing military and congressional leaders to observe and experience a new generation of light vehicle mobility and protection.

“Experience has taught us that the very nature of warfare has changed – and the JLTV program is addressing the fact that our troops need a light, protected vehicle that can perform on any number of future battlefields with unpredictable conditions and threats,” said John Bryant, senior vice president of Defense Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “The military SORT simulated difficult conditions and allowed Oshkosh to demonstrate our vehicle’s exceptional power and agility while maneuvering steep inclines, hairpin turns and rugged terrain.”

As a participant in the JLTV Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase, Oshkosh has completed manufacturing of its 22 JLTV prototypes – which were built on an active manufacturing line by a highly-skilled Oshkosh workforce using Lean processes and a proven quality management system. The Oshkosh JLTV prototypes, which will be delivered to the government in August, include both the 4-door multi-purpose variant and the 2-door utility variant.

“The entire Oshkosh team – from engineering to supply chain to manufacturing – is absolutely committed to the JLTV program. It was amazing to see the first JLTV prototype make its way down a warm assembly line, start right up and drive off the line – as if we’ve been making them for years,” said Bryant. “Our truck’s performance at the JLTV demonstration reflects a deep commitment to our troops and a true understanding of the critical role this vehicle will play in protecting them.”

Source : Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE: OSK)

Published on ASDNews: Jun 17, 2013

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-49582/Oshkosh_Demos_JLTV_Prototypes_for_US_DoD_and_Congr essional_Leadership.htm#ixzz2WT9kTcqj

buglerbilly
18-06-13, 11:37 AM
JLTV 'Closes Capability Gap,' Army Says



While the Humvee has served the Army well for some 25 years, there's a "capability gap" in what it can do for warfighters on a 21st-century battlefield, said the Soldier responsible for overseeing its replacement.

That replacement is the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV, said Col. John Cavedo, manager, Joint Program Office, or JPO, for JLTV, during an off-road demonstration at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area here, June 14, 2013.

Cavedo said the JLTV "closes the capability gap" left by the Humvee.

Marine Lt. Col. Mike Burks, deputy, JPO, JLTV explained the gap.

"We've been trying to break the laws of physics by overloading the Humvee with survivability measures," Burks said. "The Humvee is overloaded even before a Soldier or Marine gets inside."

The other vehicle used to transport Soldiers and Marines around the battlefield, the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected, or MRAP, vehicle, has the necessary armor to defeat improvised explosive devices and has saved many lives. But Burks said the MRAP lacks mobility.

One of the MRAP variants weighs as much as three JLTVs, Burkes said. The weight of that MRAP means it can't be transported by the Army CH-47 Chinook or the Marine CH-53E Super Stallion, the heavy-lift helicopters of the services.

Burkes also said that an additional concern for the Marine Corps, in regard to the MRAP, is that it can't be moved from ship-to-shore like other light wheeled vehicles.

The Army, the lead for the JLTV portfolio, plans to purchase some 49,000 JLTVs, with 5,500 for the Marine Corps. The average production cost will not exceed $250,000 per vehicle, said Cavedo.

Various JLTVs may also be specialized with kits for performing different missions, including fording, combat buffering or command. That specialization may change the cost of a particular vehicle.

Despite sequestration and budget shortfalls, the JLTV program is still on track for fiscal year 2015, Cavedo said. At that time, the JLTV contract will be awarded and the 20-plus year production cycle will begin.

The plan calls for a phase-in of JLTVs, with Humvees and MRAPs still being used, commensurate with mission requirements, said David Branham, PEO Land Systems Marine Corps.

FIERCE COMPETITION

Last year, three manufacturers were selected and are now competing for the JLTV contract. Competition is "fierce and the stakes are high because the winner takes all," said Cavedo, who noted that an important part of his job is to ensure a "level playing field" during the competition.

The three competitors include Oshkosh Defense, which builds MRAPS and other Army vehicles; Lockheed Martin, which produces High Mobility Artillery Rocket System vehicle; and AM General, who builds the Humvee.

Improvised explosive device, or IED, blast and shot testing have already been conducted at Aberdeen Test Center, Md. While not at liberty to say the levels of the blasts, Cavedo said the JLTV's survivability is comparable to the MRAP.

The next milestone comes in mid-August 2013, when each competitor will turn over 22 JLTV prototypes for testing. Those 66 vehicles will undergo 14 months of rigorous testing in a variety of battlefield scenarios conducted by Soldiers and Marines, said Cavedo.

Testing areas include Yuma Proving Grounds, Ariz.; Redstone Test Center, Ala.; and Fort Huachuca, Ariz. Additionally, both the Marine Corps and the Army will conduct helicopter trials of the vehicles at various locations, and there will be ship-to-shore testing conducted at Little Creek, Va.

Reliability, availability and maintainability, called RAM testing, will determine the winner, Cavedo said. Additionally, input from Soldiers and Marines "will absolutely be taken very seriously."

RAM testing includes the "iron triangle of performance," Cavedo said. That includes evaluations of performance, protection and payload. The vehicles will also be evaluated for transportability, mobility, expeditionary capability, network-readiness and affordability.

In early fiscal year 2015, following user testing, the requirements document will be revalidated to ensure the original requirements are still pertinent. After that, a winner will be chosen, Cavedo said.

During the demonstration runs at Quantico, Va., all three of the JLTVs in the competition ran smoothly at high speed over the roller coaster-like hills which followed alongside power transmission lines. The vehicles didn't protest turns at high speed, and bumps and ruts barely registered. Inside the vehicles there was plenty of room for network gear, blue-force tracker, GPS, and other networking and communications equipment. Seating was comfortable as well.

"All three vendors absolutely meet the key requirements, all could close that critical and substantial capability gap in our light tactical wheel portfolio," Cavedo concluded. "In the end, the government will pick very best of best. We're in a fortunate situation."

Source : US Army

Published on ASDNews: Jun 18, 2013

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-49673/JLTV__Closes_Capability_Gap,__Army_Says.htm#ixzz2W Yxc6WAn

buglerbilly
20-06-13, 10:15 PM
Are Active Protection Systems About To Have Their Day?

Jun. 20, 2013 - 01:59PM

By PAUL McLEARY

WASHINGTON — Over the past several years, American MRAPs, M-ATVs and Strykers in Afghanistan and Iraq have fattened up, growing wider and heavier with metal grates and large netting systems bolted onto already burdened chassis, all to fend off rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) attacks.

While the threat from buried roadside bombs has been the No. 1 killer of US and coalition troops in this past decade’s two wars, RPGs and explosively formed penetrators have also done their share of damage.

In future conflicts, American defense planners expect to face not only these threats, but weapons such as anti-tank missiles and kinetic energy rounds from more advanced enemies. To meet those threats without bolting thousands of pounds of equipment onto their vehicles, the US Army has made installing a “hard kill” active protection system (APS) on its Ground Combat Vehicle a key requirement.

BAE Systems and General Dynamics are the two companies left standing in the GCV competition. On May 29, General Dynamics announced that it had concluded a successful critical design review on its APS effort, and is planning to mount it on a Light Armored Vehicle III demonstrator this year.

After doing a study on APS technologies for the Army several years ago, Sonya Sepahban, GD Land Systems’ senior vice president for engineering, development and technology, said, “we went out and selected one” to begin testing.

While she would not disclose any specifics on the APS — a source close to the competition suggests that it is a Raytheon product — Sepahban did say that GD is tapping “one of the more mature systems that is out there” and is integrating it onto the LAV.

“We’re pretty much done with the integration,” she said, adding that “We believe the next step is to get one of these systems through a safety board.”

The company chose the LAV for its first integration exercise because of the vehicle’s complexity and the limited space available on it. “If you can do it on a LAV, you ought to be able to do it on larger and heavier systems” like the GCV, she said.

But it won’t be easy.

A November Congressional Budget Office report about technical challenges for the GCV concluded that “the basic physics and engineering of active protective defense is a challenge. That challenge is multiplied by the possibility that the enemy may adopt tactics or defense suppression measures to neutralize the effectiveness of the active protective system.”

On April 29, the manufacturer of the APS that BAE Systems is putting on its GCV issued a statement saying that its Iron Curtain system defeated every round shot at it in a US government test.

A person close to the test program told Defense News that the shots were part of a “major test event for the GCV.”

While Keith Brendley, the president of Herndon, Va.’s Artis LLC, declined to say how many shots were fired, he did tell Defense News that there were “enough to establish reasonable statistical confidence.”

The Iron Curtain is mounted on top of the vehicle, and using C-band radar, detects the incoming round, tracking it until a sensor selects which countermeasure to fire once the target gets in close. From a rack installed along the top of the vehicle, the countermeasure fires straight down, detonating the rocket or missile.

In 2012, Artis also demonstrated the capability for the Pentagon’s Joint Program Office for Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected Vehicles.

buglerbilly
24-06-13, 02:30 PM
General Dynamics European Land Systems Awarded New Contract for 100 Eagle V 4x4 Vehicles for Germany

(Source: General Dynamics; issued June 21, 2013)



KAISERSLAUTERN, Germany --– General Dynamics European Land Systems was awarded a contract by the German Procurement Agency, Bundesamt für Ausrüstung, Informationstechnik und Nutzung der Bundeswehr (BAAINBw), for the delivery of 100 Eagle V Protected Command Vehicles for the “GFF Klasse 2” Program. This contract includes an option for the purchase of 76 additional vehicles.

The Eagle V is a further development of the Eagle IV fleet, already in service. The Eagle V features a larger payload capacity and increased crew protection at the same level of mobility. The total cost of ownership of these vehicles will be reduced through the Eagle Family of Vehicles concept, with its high degree of commonality, maintenance-friendly design and proven support solutions.

The vehicles will be jointly manufactured in Kreuzlingen (Switzerland) and Kaiserslautern (Germany). Deliveries will start in 2013 and continue throughout 2015, if the option is exercised.

After thorough testing by the Bundeswehr at their proving grounds, the Eagle V fulfilled all requirements, demonstrating its high agility, tactical mobility, survivability and its suitability for the entire mission spectrum for this class of vehicles.

The Protected Command Vehicles can be used for various missions by applying modular add-on kits. In addition to the high level of crew protection, the substantial payload capability is designed to fulfil future requirements.

Due to its ergonomic design and usability the Eagle V is easy to handle and has low training costs.

Lifecycle costs of the vehicle fleet are further minimized by a high degree of logistic commonality of approximately 80% among the Eagle V (4x4 and 6x6), the Eagle IV and the Duro IIIP tactical truck.

The Eagle V sets the standard for protected wheeled vehicles in the weight class of up to 10 t. The Eagle V has a length of 5.40 m, a height of 2.38 m, a width of 2.2 m, and it accommodates up to 5 persons. It reaches a top speed of 110 km/h on the road and manages gradients of up to 60%.

The 245 HP Cummins turbocharged diesel engine, in connection with an Allison 5-speed automatic transmission, the remarkable De Dion axle system with the patented roll stabilizer, the tire pressure control system and the permanent all-wheel drive give the Eagle V superior on-road and off-road mobility. Thanks to the modular protection system, the Eagle V offers a very high level of protection against ballistic threats, mines, and IEDs. Furthermore, the vehicle is equipped with an NBC overpressure system.

General Dynamics European Land Systems (GDELS), headquartered in Madrid, Spain, is a business unit of General Dynamics and conducts its business through four European operating sites located in Spain, Germany, Austria and Switzerland. With more than 3,000 highly skilled technical employees, General Dynamics European Land Systems’ companies design, manufacture and deliver land combat systems, including wheeled, tracked, and amphibious vehicles, bridge systems, armaments and munitions, to global customers.

-ends-

buglerbilly
24-06-13, 02:39 PM
1,000th Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon Delivered To Defence

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued June 24, 2013)



Seen none around Perth yet............

Minister for Defence Materiel Dr Mike Kelly AM MP today announced the delivery of the 1000th Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon under Project LAND 121 Phase 3A.

The new G-Wagons, along with Australian-made trailers, are being rolled out to Army and Royal Australian Air Force units as part of LAND 121 ‘Project Overlander’, a $7.5 billion program delivering more than 7500 protected and unprotected vehicles to the Australian Defence Force (ADF) over the next decade.

“The new G-Wagons will help prepare ADF personnel for operations and provide the flexibility to undertake a wide range of tasks in difficult off-road conditions, while ensuring that Australian soldiers are better prepared and equipped,” Dr Kelly said.

The new variants are used as tactical training vehicles and for a wide range of support tasks.

“G-Wagon variants include utility, ambulance, surveillance and reconnaissance, mobile command post variants, and even a canine variant to transport military working dogs and their handlers,” Dr Kelly said.

Dr Kelly congratulated Mercedes-Benz on the delivery of the first 1000 G-Wagons, adding that the G-Wagon represents a big step forward for the ADF’s tactical training capability.

“Today’s handover of the 1000th G-Wagon represents an important milestone at the Mercedes-Benz facility in Mulgrave, Victoria,” Dr Kelly said.

“At the Mulgrave facility, modules and tray bodies provided by G.H. Varley in Newcastle are integrated with the vehicles and pre-delivery work is undertaken.”

A total of 2146 G-Wagons are being rolled out to ADF units between July 2012 and June 2016.

-ends-

buglerbilly
24-06-13, 10:00 PM
KMW announces delivery of 1,000th Dingo vehicle

24 June 2013 - 15:00 by the Shephard News Team



The German Federal Ministry of Defense has taken delivery of new Dingo general protection transport vehicles from manufacturer Krauss-Maffei Wegmann (KMW) at a ceremony in Munich on 20 June.

This delivery marks the 1,000th Dingo vehicle to be delivered by KMW since the vehicle entered service with German forces in 2000.

The Dingo family of vehicles has since demonstrated its performance on extremely difficult terrains and under extreme climatic conditions during operations in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Macedonia, Kosovo, Lebanon, Chad and Afghanistan.

The Dingo 2 has built on the success of the original version, with first-class protection and mobility characteristics and a variable equipment concept, which allows specific equipping for current as well as future mission profiles. Equipment options and the protection cell can be adapted to suit the needs of the customer. The patrol vehicle cell is offered in various designs for up to 8 occupants, while the large volume cell features doors to the sides and rear and can accommodate a variety of equipment such as a command post, NBC reconnaissance or ambulance.

In total 16 Dingo variants have been delivered, and the current series Dingo 2 is operating successfully in six nations.

buglerbilly
25-06-13, 12:32 PM
6x6 EAGLE V...........not seen very often..........

buglerbilly
25-06-13, 10:57 PM
Clean shot of the 4x4......

buglerbilly
26-06-13, 12:32 PM
Check Your Six

40,000 Check-6 systems delivered to U.S. Army



“Check your six” is a term commonly used by troops in theater, reminding their teams to keep an eye on what’s behind them. Our Check-6 vehicle taillight camera helps fighting forces do just that, allowing them to see behind their vehicles while remaining protected under vehicle armor.

Today, seven years after it was invented, we’re proud to celebrate the delivery of the 40,000th Check-6 system to the U.S. Army. This unique, patented invention – a thermal imaging camera sensor embedded within the military style taillight housing of ground vehicles – has been providing combat crews in Iraq and Afghanistan with day, night, and all-weather rear vision capability on a variety of military combat and tactical vehicles. These include heavy-armored tracked and wheeled vehicles such as the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle, MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (MATV), M1 Abrams main battle tank, Stryker Family of Vehicles, and Medium Mine Protected Vehicle (MMPV).

“Being able to see outside the vehicle’s armor provides a vital increase in situational awareness and safety for the soldiers inside it,” said Gary Morris, business development manager at BAE Systems. “Our Check-6 cameras improve safety and mission effectiveness, and above all, they can help save lives.”

These rear vision systems use thermal or color cameras embedded into Department of Defense style taillights, offering performance with easy installation and the ability to replace taillight housings common to more than 200,000 military vehicles. The Check-6 systems are manufactured in Austin, Texas, at our center for engineering and manufacturing of Integrated Vision System products for the military.

Source : BAE Systems PLC (LSE: BAES.L)

Published on ASDNews: Jun 25, 2013

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-49912/Check_Your_Six.htm#ixzz2XJxjeAmo

buglerbilly
27-06-13, 11:10 AM
LM's Final JLTV Development Vehicle Rolls off Assembly Line



The final Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) produced for the program’s Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase has rolled off the assembly line, joining a fleet of previously completed vehicles that will be delivered for government testing and evaluation this summer.

The Lockheed Martin team produced a total of 22 JLTV test vehicles, which were manufactured at BAE Systems’ Sealy, Texas, manufacturing facility, a world leader in the production of military and severe-duty wheeled vehicles. Delivery to the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for long-term testing and evaluation is scheduled for August 22.




JLTV SORT

LockheedMartinVideos
Published on 20 Jun 2013

The JLTV proves off-road success at the Severe Off-Road Track at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., on May 31, 2013.

“Lockheed Martin is committed to providing our soldiers and Marines with a vehicle of unequalled capability and dependability, and one that is affordable both to buy and to operate,” said Scott Greene, vice president of ground vehicles for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. “We are excited to get these vehicles into the hands of the customer. Early break-in testing is under way, and we are confident that our JLTV design will serve our servicemen and women well.”

<p> Following successes in the program’s Technology Development phase, the U.S. Army and Marine Corps awarded Lockheed Martin a $65 million contract in August 2012 to continue developing JLTV through the EMD phase. Initial tests demonstrated that the Lockheed Martin design provided blast protection equivalent to much larger mine-resistant vehicles in service today.</p> <p> The Lockheed Martin Joint Light Tactical Vehicle balances the “iron triangle” of protection, performance and payload while maintaining affordability. Compared to general-purpose vehicles currently in service, the Lockheed Martin JLTV will provide greatly improved crew protection and mobility, lower logistical support costs, superior fuel efficiency and state-of-the-art connectivity with other platforms and systems. The team’s current JLTV design maintains the proven force protection, transportability and reliability of the earlier Technology Development model, while significantly reducing weight and cost.</p> <p> For more than three decades, Lockheed Martin has applied its systems-integration expertise to a wide range of successful ground vehicles for U.S. and allied forces worldwide. The company’s products include the combat-proven Multiple Launch Rocket System M270-series and HIMARS mobile launchers, Havoc 8x8, Common Vehicle, Light Armored Vehicle-Command and Control, Warrior Capability Sustainment Programme, Joint Light Tactical Vehicle and pioneering unmanned platforms such as the Squad Mission Support System.</p> <p> Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control is a 2012 recipient of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award for performance excellence. The Malcolm Baldrige Award represents the highest honor that can be awarded to American companies for their achievements in leadership, strategic planning, customer relations, measurement, analysis, workforce excellence, operations and results.</p>

Following successes in the program’s Technology Development phase, the U.S. Army and Marine Corps awarded Lockheed Martin a $65 million contract in August 2012 to continue developing JLTV through the EMD phase. Initial tests demonstrated that the Lockheed Martin design provided blast protection equivalent to much larger mine-resistant vehicles in service today.

The Lockheed Martin Joint Light Tactical Vehicle balances the “iron triangle” of protection, performance and payload while maintaining affordability. Compared to general-purpose vehicles currently in service, the Lockheed Martin JLTV will provide greatly improved crew protection and mobility, lower logistical support costs, superior fuel efficiency and state-of-the-art connectivity with other platforms and systems. The team’s current JLTV design maintains the proven force protection, transportability and reliability of the earlier Technology Development model, while significantly reducing weight and cost.

For more than three decades, Lockheed Martin has applied its systems-integration expertise to a wide range of successful ground vehicles for U.S. and allied forces worldwide. The company’s products include the combat-proven Multiple Launch Rocket System M270-series and HIMARS mobile launchers, Havoc 8x8, Common Vehicle, Light Armored Vehicle-Command and Control, Warrior Capability Sustainment Programme, Joint Light Tactical Vehicle and pioneering unmanned platforms such as the Squad Mission Support System.

Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control is a 2012 recipient of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award for performance excellence. The Malcolm Baldrige Award represents the highest honor that can be awarded to American companies for their achievements in leadership, strategic planning, customer relations, measurement, analysis, workforce excellence, operations and results.

Source : Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE: LMT)

Published on ASDNews: Jun 27, 2013

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-49948/LM_s_Final_JLTV_Development_Vehicle_Rolls_off_Asse mbly_Line.htm#ixzz2XPSvlQ2e

buglerbilly
27-06-13, 10:43 PM
The Armored Group unveils BATT S AP vehicle

27 June 2013 - 14:32 by the Shephard News Team



The Armored Group (TAG) has launched a new version of its Ballistic Armored Tactical Transport (BATT) vehicle, the ‘S’ armoured personnel (AP) vehicle series. The BATT S AP has been developed with advanced safety features and tactical capabilities for the deployment and extraction of personnel, and medic services.

The BATT S AP is specifically designed for law enforcement agencies that need armoured personnel vehicles capable of protecting against NIJ IV and .50 caliber ball round threats, but have limited budgets available to outfit their tactical teams.

The vehicle offers maximum protection on a patrol-sized Ford F-550 chassis, and allows for the movement of 12-14 fully geared officers. With the Ford OEM hood, TAG has incorporated engine bay armour protection behind the fenders, behind the headlights and under the hood – a process which lowers both production costs and weight constraints.

Robert Pazderka, president and founder of TAG, said: ‘Because of its protection level, deployment and operational capabilities, size and cost, the BATT S AP has quickly become a crucial tool and economical solution for many law enforcement agencies across the country. We were aware of the financial limitations that many agencies have these days and it appears the BATT S AP provides a great solution. In order to offer them additional financial assistance we provide free grant writing for our units that are eligible for grants through the GSA 1122 programme.’

buglerbilly
28-06-13, 11:55 PM
Lawmakers Protect Funding to Refurbish Humvees

By Brendan McGarry Friday, June 28th, 2013 11:09 am



A U.S. House of Representatives panel has preserved funding to refurbish Humvees despite an Army request to shift some of the money to pay for more urgent needs.

The House Armed Services Committee, headed by Rep. Howard “Buck” McKeon, R-Calif., denied the service’s request to transfer $171 million from a program to refurbish, or re-capitalize, the iconic four-wheel drive High Mobility Multi-purposed Wheeled Vehicle, or HMMWV, known as Humvee and made by AM General LLC, based in South Bend, Ind.

“These funds are necessary … to sustain reset as units return home from Afghanistan and other deployments,” McKeon and Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., the highest-ranking Democrat on the panel, wrote to Pentagon Comptroller Robert Hale in a letter dated June 21 and obtained by Military​.com. “Rapid reset is vital to overall unit readiness, and … these vehicles could be used to address current shortfalls in the Army National Guard.”

The Humvee program had the highest transfer amount denied by the committee in its latest review of the Defense Department’s overall request to shift $9.6 billion to pay for higher-than-expected war costs and other expenses.

The Army originally planned on spending $271 million in fiscal 2013, which ends Sept. 30, to upgrade 2,128 of the light trucks, for an average cost of $127,350 per vehicle, according to budget documents.

The work is performed at the Army’s Red River Army Depot in Texarkana, Texas, where workers rebuild the trucks and install upgraded components such as frame rails, air conditioning and on-board vehicle power systems.

In other big-ticket programs, the panel also denied proposals to transfer $140 million from the Air Force’s Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures, $128 million from the Army’s battlefield communications network Warfighter Information Network-Tactical and $33 million from the Air Force’s C-130 cargo plane.

The panel deferred decisions on a number of other high-dollar transfers, including $563 million from blast-resistant trucks known as Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles, or MRAPs, $101 million from medium-duty trucks called Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles, or FMTVs, and $97 million from the self-propelled howitzer known as M109 Paladin Integrated Management.

In smaller-ticket items — but ones that drew the harshest criticism from lawmakers — the committee denied requests to transfer a total of almost $32 million from the Air Force’s research and development account for advanced technology development, specifically, advanced materials for weapons systems, aerospace propulsion, and power technology and manufacturing technology program.

“The Department would be foolish to think that it could so blatantly disregard both congressional priorities and prerogatives in determining funding levels for programs supporting national defense,” the letter states. “The committee expects that future reprogramming requests should not attempt a similar tactic of brazenly disregarding the role of Congress in determining sufficient levels of funding for programs.”

buglerbilly
01-07-13, 08:56 PM
Your JLTV Options, Live and in Color

Jun 28, 2013By Paul McLeary



After years of competition, the Army and Marine Corps are finally getting ready to choose a winner from among three competitors to produce about 55,000 Joint Light Tactical Vehicles — 50,000 for the Army and another 5,500 for the Corps, at an estimated $250,000 a pop.

Teams led by AM General, Lockheed Martin, and Oshkosh Defense are fighting it out to be top dog once the government picks a winner in 2015, and on June 14, the services had the three teams come out to Quantico to show off their designs. The companies shot lots of photos during the muddy beauty pageant, and we’ve selected a couple of shots to pass on…

Oshkosh Defense brought along their L-ATV:





Humvee maker AM General brought their Blast Resistant Vehicle – Off road (BRV-O)





And Lockheed Martin rolled out their contribution to the competition, it is the only one left of the original teams who have been competing for the contract since 2005

buglerbilly
02-07-13, 10:32 PM
New logistics trucks for the French Army

02 July 2013 - 14:38 by Tim Fish in London



The first new 8x8 logistics truck procured under the Porteur Polyvalent Terrestre (PPT) programme has been delivered to the French Army.

Italian manufacturer Iveco Defence Vehicles and French partner Soframe, handed the first of an expected 200 vehicles over to the French Army during a ceremony at the French Land Armed Forces (STAT) Headquarters on 24 June.

The PPT contract was signed between the French DGA and the Iveco-Soframe consortium in December 2010 for 200 Lot 1 and Lot 2 vehicles. Lot 1 vehicles consist of a multipurpose logistics vehicle with a loading system (PPLOG); flexible front carrier (PPAV) with the option of a multifunction hydraulic handling arm; engineering vehicle (PPBG); and a recovery vehicle (PPLD).

A spokesperson from Iveco told Shephard that the first instalment comprises 150 PPLOG and 50 PPLD vehicles.

Total vehicle acquisition plans under the PPT programme include 2,400 vehicles that will also include trailers (PPLOG/R), containers and droppable logistics. These vehicles will provide a logistics supply capability to operators on the frontline; transport or evacuate staff; maintain and remove vehicles; and transport materials.

They will replace the army’s existing Renault 6x6 VTL logistics transport vehicles and TRM 10000 heavy utility trucks. The new vehicles will offer additional crew protection with the application of armour plating against the threat of IEDs. Further protective measures include a 7.62mm weapon support stations for the addition of a MAG58 gun with ballistic protection.

The trucks will also have improved communications and a command support function. The PPLOG, PPAV, PPBG and PPLD can be fitted with the PR4G radio, SITEL information system, GPS, Defence Advanced GPS Receiver or Precision Lightweight GPS Receiver. The PTT trucks will be transportable on a BPC amphibious assault ship and by the A400M transport aircraft.

According to the DGA, the 8x8 trucks are 9.27m long and 2.55m wide and have a gross vehicle weight of 32t with a carrying capacity of 36t in the PPLOG vehicle. They have a six cylinder engine with 450 HP and can a top speed of 80km/h.

In a statement, Iveco said: ‘Logistics vehicles will be supplied with a hook-lift body for load-handling operations, whereas recovery vehicles will be supplied with a lifting boom and a crane for recovering military vehicles.’

The PPLOG vehicles can fit three people in the cabin and uses a self-loading hook system for the installation and removal of equipment. This can be removed to make space for ISO 20ft containers if required. It can carry a payload of 16t in its protected variant and 18t when unprotected. When used in the PPLOG/R variant with a trailer the payload can be increased by a further 16t.

The PPAV variant can carry ISO containers measuring 10, 15 or 20ft with a protected payload capacity of 14t. Furthermore it can also be fitted with rack, tarps and seats for transporting up to 24 people. There is also the option of a hydraulic arm for loading/unloading pallets.

The PPBG is fitted with a bucket for the transportation of construction materials and light engineering equipment. The PPLD can fit four people in the cabin and can tow other vehicles using an 18t winch that can lift 12t of equipment. It can also be fitted with a crane.

Iveco builds the truck chassis and Soframe is responsible for the integration of the equipment on the vehicle including handling arms, cranes, logistics trays, trailers, depending on the variant.

‘The body, chassis equipment, demountable rack offloading and pick up system (DROPS), logistic trailers and special ADR EX II containers will be manufactured and assembled in France by Soframe, part of the Alsatian Lohr Group,’ Iveco stated.

buglerbilly
03-07-13, 01:17 PM
Textron Marine & Land Systems Awarded Contract to Provide Innovative Approaches for Protecting HMMWV Vehicles

(Source: Textron Marine & Land Systems; issued July 2, 2013)



NEW ORLEANS, LA --- Textron Marine & Land Systems (TM&LS) announced today that it has been awarded a $3.29 million firm-fixed price contract from the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command for work on the Modernized Expanded Capacity Vehicle Survivability (MECV-S) system. TM&LS is teaming with Granite Tactical Vehicles to deliver innovative crew protection and vehicle survivability enhancements for the Army's HMMWV vehicles. The program's follow-on potential is for work on up to 5,750 vehicles.

The Army is seeking technical solutions to address current and future threats to its HMMWV tactical vehicle fleet through the use of scalable armor technologies. The TM&LS/Granite team will install its MECV-S protection system, a production-ready Technology Readiness Level 8 system, on two government-furnished HMMWVs and deliver them this summer to Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. for Improvised Explosive Device testing. Computer Aided Design models also will be submitted for analysis.

"Our TM&LS/Granite MECV-S solution would replace the current HMMWV crew compartment in a one-for-one exchange. It offers vehicle occupants an armored monocoque V-hull protective capsule and restores the vehicle's tactical mobility with proven components," explains TM&LS Senior Vice President and General Manager Tom Walmsley.

The lightweight, highly-survivable TM&LS/Granite vehicle protection system possesses a lower center of gravity than an up-armored HMMWV and is resistant to small arms fire, blasts and the secondary effects of blasts such as fire, crushing, rollover and collision. It is compatible with all versions of HMMWVs currently in service and provides MRAP-style protection by incorporating angles and a V-shaped blast deflection under-body plate.

A system that is easily supported and maintained, the Textron/Granite solution also retains all of the original HMMWV cab's characteristics by utilizing existing controls, linkages and drive system.

Granite Tactical Vehicles, located in Mt. Airy, NC, is a designer and manufacturer of tactical vehicles for military applications, law enforcement agencies and private contractors. Granite has manufacturing capabilities comprised of an 180,000 square-foot industrial facility on a 20-acre site, and a nearby two-mile rough terrain test and proving ground, which includes a measured RMS course to study and verify vehicle performance.

Textron Marine & Land Systems designs, produces and supports advanced wheeled combat vehicles and cutting-edge maritime craft used by U.S. and international armed forces, as well as civilian entities around the globe. Its COMMANDO family of armored vehicles offers a full range of vehicle options delivering enhanced survivability, mobility, lethality and sustainability. Textron Marine & Land Systems' innovative turret technology and related subsystems also deliver outstanding performance and reliability.



-ends-

buglerbilly
13-07-13, 02:23 AM
New All-Terrain Vehicles for the Swiss Army

(Source: Swiss Dept. of Defence, Public Protection and Sport; web-posted July 11, 2013)

(Unofficial English translation by defense-aerospace.com)

After twenty years of using off-road vehicles made by Puch, the Swiss Army is expected to replace them with the Mercedes G-class. The acquisition will be submitted to Parliament under a specific weapons program.

The Mercedes-Benz range of vehicles was chosen because it is the most advantageous economically. Other reasons for the choice are that they are particularly robust and use proven technology, the reduction to essential components and ease of use for the troops.

As part of the evaluation by armasuisse – the Department’s competence center for acquisitions and technology - the Mercedes G won against three competitors. The chosen model chosen is already in use in many armies.

The new Swiss army all-terrain vehicles will be equipped with a 6-cylinder, 184 hp diesel engine and used for all types of transport of people and goods.

Parliament will take a decision in the context of a weapons program.

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buglerbilly
15-07-13, 03:07 PM
Iveco Defence Vehicles Announces Delivery of the First Units of the “New Generation Vehicles” Programme to the Swiss Army

(Source: Iveco Defence Vehicles; issued July 15, 2013)



Iveco Defence Vehicles announced that, on May 28th 2013, the 14 variants of the “New Generation Vehicles” programme were symbolically handed over from armasuisse to the Swiss Armed Forces Logistics Organisation (LBA).

The hand-over ceremony was held at the Arms square of the Swiss Army in Thun and was attended by military representatives and industrial partners.

Undertaken as part of the ‘Armament Programme 2010’, this contract was awarded in 2010 and comprises the supply of 910 Iveco heavy trucks over four years. The contract also includes engineering services and project management supported by Iveco DV’s commercial premises in Germany.

The order comprises 14 variants of the “New Generation Vehicles” programme, including 4x2, 4x4, 6x2, 6x6, 8x6 and 8x8 vehicles from the Stralis and Trakker heavy truck ranges.

All vehicles are fully EEV emission compliant, featuring economical and ecologically friendly FPT Industrial Cursor engines, fitted with automated EuroTronic transmissions and Automatic Drivetrain Management (ADM). The innovative use of this technology enables the fleet to be one of the most environmentally friendly in Europe.

All 14 variants were demonstrated at the ceremony, through a combination of technical presentations, a static display and dynamic tests.

350 vehicles have already been delivered to Swiss bodybuilders and to the customer in accordance with the contracted delivery plan.

Mr. Peter Greuter (LBA) highlighted that the high level of technology offered by the vehicles and the extended use of civil COTS components were fundamental to ensure the safety and usability necessary for the fleet, and were key in the choice made by the Swiss Army.

Iveco Defence Vehicles is dedicated to delivering innovative automotive and protection solutions to meet the needs of military customers worldwide. The company manufactures specialist military logistic, protected and armoured vehicles in its facility in Bolzano in Northern Italy, as well as marketing Iveco’s full commercial range, adapted as necessary to meet the demands of the military user. In consequence, Iveco Defence Vehicles has a full range of vehicles to meet a broad spectrum of defence applications. The company has developed a vast international network giving life to a technical and commercial expertise at a world-wide level.



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buglerbilly
16-07-13, 01:22 AM
Africa On the Cusp of Vehicle Spending Spree

Jul. 15, 2013 - 08:53AM

By OSCAR NKALA


Armor Interest: DCD Protected Mobility, the South-African builder of the Husky mine detection vehicle, is among a list of firms now marketing its vehicles to African nations. (US Army)

BULAWAYO, ZIMBABWE — African countries are expected to spend up to US $20 billion on armored vehicles over the next decade, according to industry analysts and business executives, as governments battle a growing number of heavily armed transnational terrorist groups.

Specifically, nations in the Horn of Africa, Sahel-Magreb and West Africa are expected to invest in force protection equipment, experts say.

The experts made their forecast ahead of the Armoured Vehicles Africa conference in London the first week of July, which came as renowned armored vehicle manufacturers from Italy, Serbia, South Africa, the United Arab Emirates, Germany, Czech Republic, China and Britain scramble to snap up deals in Africa, as evidenced by recent acquisitions and moves by some companies to set up manufacturing plants in Africa.

Kenya, meanwhile, announced a US $700 million defense budget, which includes acquiring more and better-protected armored military vehicles in the 2013-’14 fiscal year; spending will go up to $800 million in the 2015-’16 budget.

Ivor Ichikowitz, chairman of South African-based armored military vehicle manufacturer Paramount Group, said the company sees high potential for market growth and will strive to meet the demand.

He said that while some countries in the Horn, North and West Africa are buying highly mobile, well-protected and heavily armed armored military vehicles for counterterrorism operations, many in sub-Saharan Africa — where the threat of terrorism is much lower — are seeking lightly armed, well-protected, high mobility infantry fighting, transport and logistics vehicles.

Rob King, managing director with South Africa-based DCD Protected Mobility, said because of increasing demand, the company is interested in business prospects in Africa in the next decade.

“We are excited about prospects in Africa. Armored vehicle local content is 40 to 60 percent and more for logistics vehicles,” King said.

DCD won international acclaim in the armored vehicle category when it unveiled the sturdy Husky mine detection vehicle, of which the US Army bought 1,700 for use in Afghanistan.

However, with the US Army pulling out of Afghanistan, DCD has shifted its focus back to Africa. The company recently commissioned a new 100 million rand (US $10 million) plant to manufacture armored cars at Isando outside Johannesburg, and pledged to remain among the leading suppliers to the growing African market.

In addition to the Husky clearance vehicle, DCD produces light and heavily armed variants of the Springbuck and Mountain Lion armored personnel carriers, most of which have been sold to the Nigerian Army and police forces. It also produces mine-resistant, ambush-protected versions of the Springbuck IV, which are widely used by Nigerian security forces.


Springbuck IV

However, the largest armored vehicle market remains in North and northwestern Africa, where countries are battling Islamist insurgencies that rely on heavy bombs and improvised explosives.

This year, Libya has ordered 300 BDRM and BVP-1 armored vehicles from the Czech Republic. The supply agreement includes the refurbishment of a further 300 variants of the heavily armored BDRM vehicles already in service with the Libyan Army.

In April, Libya received a total of 69 armored cars, with 20 Puma armored fighting vehicles coming from Italy and 49 Jordanian-made NIMR armored vehicles from the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan said last week that the country needs more heavily armed, high mobility armored cars for border security, rapid response, force protection, logistics, mine detection and VIP transport operations.

Due to its protracted counterterrorism war, Algeria remains one of the larger armored vehicle markets. In 2011, the country ordered 54 Fuchs armored vehicles worth $248 million from Germany, and it is set to receive a further 1,200 of the same vehicle over the next 10 years.

Sensing the high potential for market growth in North Africa, UAE-based armored vehicle and defense equipment maker Tawazun Holdings last year signed an agreement with the Algerian government to set up a factory to jointly produce NIMR armored vehicles in Algiers.

NIMR Automotive, a subsidiary of Tawazun, intends to produce four-wheel and six-wheel variants of the armored vehicle. The company has received orders for 1,800 vehicles from North African and Middle Eastern countries.


NIMR 6x6 APC


NIMR 6x6 Ute

Meanwhile, international defense consulting firm Frost & Sullivan has predicted a massive growth in African and Middle Eastern defense markets driven by defense modernization programs and the procurement of advanced defense platforms.

The report, titled “The Middle East and Africa Defence Market Assessment,” said the defense market earned revenues of $29.67 billion in 2012 and estimates this will reach $45.49 billion in 2021.

Saudi Arabia and the UAE in particular are looking to develop their military capabilities in the light of civil unrest and international instability.

buglerbilly
22-07-13, 02:36 AM
Turkey To Buy MRAPs, Weapon Carriers

Jul. 21, 2013 - 03:46PM

By BURAK EGE BEKDIL



ANKARA — Turkey will buy scores of armored vehicles and weapon carriers under two contracts worth hundreds of millions of dollars, officials said.

In the first deal, Defense Minister Ismet Yilmaz said on July 3 that Turkey would look for a new supplier for the 175 mine-resistant, ambush-protected (MRAP) vehicles a local company failed to deliver.

“In coordination with the armed forces, we will look into a new model that will substitute for the undelivered Kirpis,” Yilmaz said.

Procurement officials said that in addition to the 175 Kirpis for the Army, the police force could order 20 more. Follow-on orders from the Army and the police are also likely, they said.

This year, the Turkish Armed Forces terminated a contract with Turkish armored vehicles producer BMC for the acquisition of 468 Kirpi vehicles. The Kirpi is the country’s first locally designed and developed MRAP.

Under a 2009 contact with the Turkish government, BMC produced and delivered an initial 293 Kirpi vehicles but failed to comply with the original delivery schedule.

One source at BMC blamed “acute financing difficulties and failure to have access to a helping credit line” for the failure to deliver on time. Immediately after the termination of the contract, the country’s procurement agency, the Undersecretariat for Defense Industries (SSM), fined BMC €8 million (US $10.5 million).

One of the major players in Turkey’s booming armored vehicles market, BMC was seized in May by government authorities due to financial obligations its parent company failed to fulfill, and will be put up for sale.

The Kirpi can accommodate 13 personnel and can move over any terrain at a maximum speed of 105 kilometers per hour.

In 2011, BMC was in talks to sell scores of Kirpis to Iraq and Afghanistan. Industry sources said they see significant demand for the Kirpi in countries exposed to mine and ballistic attack threats.

They also predict substantial foreign demand for the MRAP vehicle, including in some Asian and African countries. BMC was planning to launch a special production line for a right-hand drive version of the Kirpi, which would help in the marketing to some Asian countries, including Bangladesh, Indonesia, Pakistan, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and Thailand.

Separately, SSM announced a two-way competition to acquire 184 tracked and 76 wheeled armored weapon carriers. In late June, the office sent requests for proposal to two local armored vehicle manufacturers, Otokar and FNSS.

Procurement officials estimate this contract to be worth anywhere from $150 million to $200 million.

The Turkish Army transports weapons with its aging M-113 armored carriers, Land Rovers and Willies.

In 2006, SSM announced a contest for the purchase of 1,075 four-wheel-drive weapon carriers, issuing requests for proposals in 2008. Local manufacturers Otokar, FNSS, Hema, Nurol and BMC submitted bids but in 2010 SSM canceled this competition.

buglerbilly
26-07-13, 02:02 PM
Government of Canada Requests Proposals for Purchase of Medium Trucks for the Canadian Armed Forces

(Source: Public Works and Government Services Canada; issued July 25, 2013)

GATINEAU, Quebec --- Public Works and Government Services Canada has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) to acquire a new fleet of medium trucks to replace and modernize the Canadian Armed Forces’ current fleet.

The Government of Canada is launching a new solicitation process for the procurement of standard military pattern vehicles.

Prior to the release of the RFP, Public Works and Government Services Canada, in consultation with the Department of National Defence, began the industry engagement process with a Letter of Interest issued on January 4, 2013, and one-on-one meetings with industry representatives held January 17 to 23, 2013.

Public Works and Government Services Canada, on behalf of the Department of National Defence, is purchasing a fleet of up to 1500 medium-sized trucks and associated logistics to replace and modernize the current medium-sized logistics trucks. The standard military pattern vehicle requirement includes both the acquisition of five variants of the vehicle and associated equipment as well as in-service support for the life of the vehicle.

Vehicle testing and other government evaluations are scheduled to take place during 2014. The awarding of a contract is expected to be announced in fall 2015. The delivery of the first vehicle is expected in summer 2017, and final delivery by summer 2018.

The RFP, released by Public Works and Government Services Canada on behalf of the Department of National Defence, appears on the Canadian public tender service, hosted on Buyandsell.gc.ca—the authoritative source on Government of Canada procurement information. It will close December 17, 2013.

The Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) Policy, which applies to this procurement, will ensure that the winning contractor creates economic benefits in Canada equal to 100 per cent of the contract value, including a minimum of 20 per cent direct IRB for the acquisition and 35 per cent direct IRB for the in-service support contract.

-ends-

buglerbilly
26-07-13, 02:06 PM
Oshkosh Defense Confirms Intent to Bid for Canada's MSVS SMP

(Source: Oshkosh Defense; issued July 25, 2013)

OSHKOSH, Wis. --- Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, reconfirmed its support for Canadian tactical vehicle modernization programmes by announcing its intent to respond to the Medium Support Vehicle System (MSVS) Standard Military Pattern (SMP) request for proposal.

Oshkosh Defense will propose a solution that leverages the company’s mission-proven vehicle platforms, advanced automotive and safety technologies and life-cycle sustainment solutions to offer the overall best value to the Canadian Government.

“We are committed to providing tactical vehicles with the performance and protection that Canadian Forces require to keep their missions moving,” said John Urias, Oshkosh Corporation executive vice president and president of Oshkosh Defense. “By developing a nationwide network of suppliers, Oshkosh Defense is well-positioned to support Canadian vehicle modernization strategy and bring measurable benefits to the Canadian economy.”

“The Oshkosh MSVS SMP solution is designed to improve the protection and performance capabilities of the Canadian Forces’ medium-payload fleet, both today and for decades to come,” said Serge Buchakjian, senior vice president and general manager of International Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “The MSVS SMP technical solution developed by Oshkosh is based on a platform with more than one billion real-world operational kilometres in missions around the globe.”

Designed to meet the Canadian Forces’ requirements for highly reliable, durable logistics vehicles for a broad range of missions, the Oshkosh MSVS SMP combines state-of-the-art drive train, advanced suspension, improved braking and superior armour protection systems.

Oshkosh Defense will serve as the prime contractor for the programme and use its Canadian network of suppliers and assembly capabilities to return value to the Canadian economy. Oshkosh programme management, industrial regional benefits (IRB) management, engineering, contract management, and purchasing support for the MSVS SMP programme will be conducted from the Oshkosh Defense Canada office in Ottawa, Ontario.

Oshkosh Defense is a leading provider of tactical wheeled vehicles and life cycle sustainment services. For more than 90 years, Oshkosh has been mobilizing military and security forces around the globe by offering a full portfolio of heavy, medium, light and highly protected military vehicles to support our customers’ missions.

-ends-

buglerbilly
26-07-13, 02:08 PM
As far as I know, there are four probable bidders, Oshkosh, Rheinmetall MAN, Mercedes and Navistar..........I read somewhere that Sisu might be in, but nothing since............

buglerbilly
31-07-13, 02:17 AM
USMC wants MRAP survivability upgrade

30 July 2013 - 16:59 by Tim Fish in London



The USMC has released a pre-solicitation calling for MRAP Cougar vehicle egress upgrade kits for the family of vehicles.

Information provided on the Federal Business Opportunities website on 29 July stated that the egress kits must ‘increase survivability of vehicle occupants by ensuring personnel can exit after a blast, rollover, and water submersion’.

It said egress kits were required for a front door system; rear door system to include new rear steps; and an exhaust upgrade system. The contracted work will include production of the kits, development of technical manuals, logistics support and configuration management. The kits will be installed by government personnel.

The solicitation said that a draft solicitation will follow on from industry feedback before a final RFP is sent out. An industry day at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland, designed for familiarisation with the Cougar vehicles is also expected although dates have yet to be finalised.

Cougar 4x4 and 6x6 vehicles have a V-shaped hull to protect marines from land mines and IEDs and have been in USMC service since 2004. The vehicles were built by Force Protection, which was bought by General Dynamics Land Systems in 2011 for $360 million.

Measuring 3.2m tall, 2.71m wide and 6.35m long, the 4x4 has a combat weight of 43,000lb and space for six passengers. It has four egress points consisting of a driver door, co-driver door, rear crew double door and top-side hatch. The 6x6 is slightly longer at 7.52m long with space for 10 occupants.

buglerbilly
03-08-13, 06:24 AM
LMT wins order for 79 AV91 protected vehicles

Written by Guy Martin Thursday, 01 August 2013 10:01

No pics yet, due to Customer confidentiality............

South African company Land Mobility Technologies (LMT) has been awarded a contract for the supply of 79 of its new AV91 light protected vehicles, which will be delivered over the next 12 months.

LMT told defenceWeb that the order, valued at R150 million, came from an undisclosed Middle Eastern country. Production will commence from September at LMT’s plant in Waltloo, Pretoria.

Stefan Nell, CEO of LMT, said that his company was successful with the tender because it developed a new vehicle from scratch to suit the client’s requirements, rather than using an existing product that may not have complied with all the customer’s requirements.

The AV91 is a newly developed light patrol vehicle, designed to be both highly mobile on and off road and well protected. It can carry 11 people.

LMT said the order will maintain and create jobs at LMT, and will support a number of LMT’s sub suppliers with work packages.

LMT Holdings is a privately-owned engineering and manufacturing company established in 1999. It builds armoured vehicles, hulls and cabs and also offers product testing, simulations, maintenance and product support.

Some of its products include the Gecko 8x8 tactical vehicle, used by the SANDF, armoured truck cabs, explosive ordnance disposal vehicles, Humvee add-on armour and the AV55 light patrol vehicle. The company is also involved in the South African National Defence Force’s Badger infantry combat vehicle project, providing the flat floor landmine kit used in the vehicle. LMT’s protected cabs are manufactured for Mercedes Benz in Germany and used by at least three NATO countries in Afghanistan and elsewhere.

In September last year Denel announced that it had acquired a majority stake in LMT (51%), with the remainder of the shares belonging to Pamodzi Investment Holdings (29%) and the founding members of LMT (20%). LMT and its design and manufacturing facilities in Waltloo became part of Denel’s specialist landward defence cluster which also includes Denel Land Systems and Denel Mechem.

buglerbilly
08-08-13, 12:11 PM
Canadian TAPV Program Starts Pre-Production Vehicle Testing and Training



Textron Systems Canada Inc., a Textron Inc. (NYSE: TXT) company, today announced that Textron Marine & Land Systems (TM&LS) has completed and shipped four pre-production Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicles (TAPV) to locations in the United States and Canada for a series of testing and training activities.

The Textron TAPV Team, led by Textron Systems Canada, was selected in June 2012 to manufacture 500 Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicles with options for up to 100 more. The TAPV contract, with options, has a value of $603.4 million CAD, with an additional five-year in-service support contract of $105.4 million CAD.

In early July, the first pre-production vehicle (PPV) was sent to Aberdeen Test Center, a U.S. Army test facility in Maryland, for qualification testing; a process scheduled to take five months. The second PPV arrived at Rheinmetall Canada in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec in mid July. Rheinmetall completed Land Communication Information System training with this vehicle, which was followed by electro optical technical training performed by Kongsberg Protech Systems Canada and vehicle technician training by TM&LS.

The third and fourth TAPV PPVs also are at Rheinmetall Canada, where vehicle integration activities are taking place. Over the next several weeks, TM&LS is scheduled to finish work on two additional PPVs. At that point, five of the six PPVs will be sent to Canadian Forces Base Valcartier in Quebec for two weeks of Operator and Gunner Operator Training starting in late August. Immediately following, these pre-production TAPVs will begin Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Durability (RAMD) testing at Valcartier. RAMD testing is expected to continue for eight months.

"Our pre-production vehicle assembly, testing and training is on schedule and moving us toward the start of full-rate production planned for January of 2014," said Neil Rutter, general manager of Textron Systems Canada. "We remain committed to working with our Department of National Defense customer and our partners here in Canada to build and support a fleet of TAPVs that provide Canadian soldiers with unmatched performance and protection for decades."

Ottawa-based Textron Systems Canada, as prime contractor, is providing overall TAPV program and configuration management, acting as design authority for change management, coordinating vehicle integration activities by Canadian subcontractors, and managing the In-Service Support contract. Textron Systems Canada also is implementing a pan-Canadian Industrial and Regional Benefits program designed to bring new expertise and opportunities to Canadian companies.

The Textron TAPV is the most reliable and technologically advanced vehicle of its kind. It draws on the company's more than 45 years of experience in the design and production of armoured vehicles. The Textron TAPV is designed to provide the Canadian Forces with the optimal balance of survivability, mobility and versatility, while delivering outstanding performance in the world's most challenging environments. Extensively tested to confirm ballistic, blast, mobility and reliability levels, the Textron TAPV has been engineered to meet and exceed Canada's requirements.

Source : Textron Inc. (NYSE: TXT)

Published on ASDNews: Aug 8, 2013

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-50564/Canadian_TAPV_Program_Starts_Pre-Production_Vehicle_Testing_and_Training.htm#ixzz2b NI3IEkX

buglerbilly
08-08-13, 02:54 PM
First Oshkosh JLTV EMD prototype delivered

08 August 2013 - 12:52 by the Shephard News Team



Oshkosh Defense has delivered the first Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) prototype for government testing following a successful vehicle inspection by the Defense Contract Management Agency. Oshkosh will deliver 22 JLTV prototypes for the government-testing portion of the engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) phase of the JLTV programme.

The programme aims to replace a portion of the US military’s aged High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) fleet. The leading requirements for the vehicle include mobility, survivability, transportability and life-cycle value.

John Urias, Oshkosh Corporation executive vice president and president of Oshkosh Defense, said: ‘The JLTV will fill a vital capabilities gap in the military’s light vehicle fleet and protect our men and women in uniform for decades to come.

‘The Oshkosh JLTV solution we are now submitting for government testing transforms the concept of what a light vehicle can be – merging key design aspects of high-performance tactical vehicles and highly survivable combat vehicles. The result is a new level of protected mobility in a light platform.’

Prototypes being delivered include a four-door multi-purpose variant and two-door utility variant. Oshkosh Defense will provide training and support for the vehicles as they are accepted and evaluated by the US Government.

Along with Oshkosh, AM General and Lockheed Martin were also selected for EMD contracts in August 2012.

buglerbilly
09-08-13, 04:21 AM
More on this.....

Oshkosh Delivers JLTV Prototype

by Matt Cox on August 8, 2013



Oshkosh Defense delivered its first Joint Light Tactical Vehicle prototype for the next phase of government testing to replace the outdated Humvee.

The Aug. 7 ceremony occurred as the Pentagon prepares to open the engineering and manufacturing development phase of the program. Oshkosh Defense is scheduled to deliver another 21 JLTV prototypes this month.

Oshkosh, Lockheed Martin and AM General were awarded EMD contracts for the JLTV program in August 2012. The three defense companies have until 2014 to build their prototypes for testing. So far, the joint Marine Corps and Army program has avoided cuts brought on by massive defense spending reductions under sequestration.

Oshkosh officials maintain that their JLTV prototype will deliver unprecedented levels of mobility, survivability, transportability and life-cycle value for the JLTV program.

“The JLTV will fill a vital capabilities gap in the military’s light vehicle fleet and protect our men and women in uniform for decades to come,” said John Urias, Oshkosh Corporation executive vice president and president of Oshkosh Defense, in a recent press release. “The Oshkosh JLTV solution we are now submitting for government testing transforms the concept of what a light vehicle can be – merging key design aspects of high-performance tactical vehicles and highly survivable combat vehicles. The result is a new level of protected mobility in a light platform.”

Oshkosh also builds the MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle, a platform that has seen extensive combat in Afghanistan.

Prototypes being delivered include a four-door multi-purpose variant and two-door utility variant. They also feature Oshkosh’s TAK-4i intelligent independent suspension system and a digitally controlled Duramax engine designed to power through steep inclines and deep desert sands, Oshkosh officials maintain.

buglerbilly
13-08-13, 12:49 PM
More on TAPV..........

Canadian Army receives first TAPVs for training

13 August 2013 - 11:29 by Tim Fish in London



The first four pre-production Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicles (TAPVs) for the Canadian Army have been shipped to locations in the US and Canada for testing and training.

Textron Marine & Land Systems (TM&LS) announced on 7 August that the company had delivered the first pre-production vehicle (PPV) to the US Army’s Aberdeen Test Centre in Maryland for qualification testing, which is expected to take five months.

Also in July, a second PPV has been sent to the Rheinmetall Canada facility in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec. According to TM&LS, this vehicle has completed three sets of tests including land communication information systems training by Rheinmetall; electro-optical technical training by Kongsberg Protech Systems; and vehicle technician training by TM&LS.

The third and fourth PPVs are also at the Rheinmetall facility for integration activities.

‘Over the next several weeks, TM&LS is scheduled to finish work on two additional PPVs. At that point, five of the six PPVs will be sent to Canadian Forces Base Valcartier in Quebec for two weeks of operator and gunner operator training starting in late August,’ TM&LS said.

Following this activity, the pre-production TAPVs will undertake reliability, availability, maintainability and durability testing for eight months. The company said that full-rate production is planned to begin in January 2014.

Textron Systems Canada was selected in June 2012 for the TAPV programme to deliver 500 vehicles. The TAPV contract is worth C$603.4million including options for a further 100 vehicles. An additional five-year in-service support contract is worth C$105.4m.

Rheinmetall Canada was awarded a €160m sub-contract to Textron in October last year for production phase work including the critical final assembly and testing of the vehicles and integrated logistics support.

It will also integrate sub-systems including a remote controlled weapon station, vehicle navigation system and driver vision enhancement system. The production phase of the acquisition contract is expected to span July 2014 through to March 2016.

When the vehicles enter service, Rheinmetall will provide in-service support for the TAPV fleet. This will start with Initial Operational Capability when the first 47 vehicles are delivered, planned for 2014 and is expected to end in 2021, five years after the last vehicle is delivered.

buglerbilly
15-08-13, 12:16 AM
Official: Funding for JLTV Testing Could Dry Up Next Summer

Aug. 14, 2013 - 02:18PM

By PAUL McLEARY



DALLAS — Due to funding cuts, program managers for the next-generation light infantry vehicle being designed for the US Army and Marine Corps are preparing to take a calculated gamble with the program’s testing schedule, an Army official said today.

With the cuts mandated by sequestration biting into the planned testing and evaluation budget of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV), joint program manager Col. John Cavedo said that instead of pushing back the start of testing in order to save money, the services are going to proceed as planned until next summer.

If sequestration remains in place and the program doesn’t receive a new infusion of cash by next July, then the services will have to begin curtailing planned testing and evaluation activities, which would push the program’s schedule back.

“We decided to start the program at full pace, and we’re going to fix those things that need fixing” next summer if sequestration remains in place, Cavedo told a small group of reporters. “We lost money due to sequester and we have to figure out how to do testing without that money” he said.

Speaking after an event at a Lockheed Martin facility here that marked the company’s official handoff of 22 JLTVs about to undergo 14 months of testing and evaluation by the services, Cavedo also sought to squash talk that the Marines are growing disillusioned with the program.

He said that despite comments by USMC Commandant Gen. James Amos earlier this year that the Corps was reconsidering participation in the program, “as I know it today, the Army and the Marine Corps are absolutely still committed” to the program.

Since Aug. 1, Lockheed Martin, Oshkosh and AM General have delivered 22 vehicles each to the services for assessment. A production award is then expected in late fiscal 2015 for approximately 50,000 JLTVs for the Army, with their Marine Corps partners purchasing another 5,500 vehicles.

Cavedo confirmed that the per-unit cost for the JLTV remains at about $250,000.

Some of the planned tests later this year and early next include a series of company-sized operational assessments of the JLTV. Platoons of soldiers and Marines will “deploy” to training ranges in the United States for several weeks of real-world drills where they’ll put the vehicles though their paces.

In May, a spokesman for the program told Defense News that sequestration could delay the program by three to four months, pushing the production decision into fiscal 2016.

As it stands now, congressional committees have approved the Army’s $84 million request for the JLTV in fiscal 2014, while the Marines asked for $50 million.

buglerbilly
15-08-13, 12:49 AM
JLTV Stays On Track Until Summer

By Michael Hoffman Wednesday, August 14th, 2013 6:04 pm

The Army officer leading the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program said Wednesday he doesn’t plan to delay testing in the first year of the Engineering and Manufacturing Development phase of the program.

Col. John Cavedo, the JLTV’s joint program manager, explained Wednesday that the testing schedule for the EMD phase will continue as planned before managers re-evaluate the pace next summer, according to multiple reports. It’s a move that stands in the face of the decisions made by many other program managers to push back testing and development cycles in hopes of keeping programs alive as Congress and Pentagon budgeteers search for savings inside the defense budget.

The JLTV program was supposed to develop the vehicle that would eventually replace the Humvee. Those initial goals have since been slimmed down to match budget realities. At one point, it appeared that the Pentagon was instead leaning toward instead upgrading the current Humvees.

The Army and Marine Corps have since pared down the requirements for the program and similarly the price per vehicle to $250,000. However, the Marine Corps has wavered in its commitment after Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos said his service would have to re-evaluate its position in the program because of the sequestration budget cuts.

Oshkosh, Lockheed Martin and AM General are the three companies who are leading teams in the competition and received EMD contracts to deliver prototypes for testing. The three companies have since delivered the 22 JLTV prototypes.

Cavedo made his comments in Texas on Wednesday at a ceremony at Lockheed Martin’s facility where company officials celebrated the delivery of the 22 prototypes well before the deadline. Executives have long said it would not pose a significant challenge to deliver the prototypes on time.

Cavedo pointed out that the JLTV program remains at risk to sequestration. He explained that reductions to the program’s funding cut into the test program. He also said the program will need additional funding next summer or be forced to impose delays.

In January, the Army announced it would extend the Technology Development phase of the Ground Combat Vehicle program — one of the Army’s top modernization priorities — by six months and reduce the number of contracts issued for the engineering and manufacturing development phase from three to one.

Many expected a similar fate for the JLTV program to which company executives for Oskosh, Lockheed Martin and AM General said they didn’t expect a delay to cause serious damage to the program. Instead, the program will remain on schedule for the first year of the EMD phase.

buglerbilly
20-08-13, 03:45 AM
Researchers@Work: Armor Technology
ARLTVNews
Published on 16 Aug 2013

Dr. Chris Hoppel, chief of the Army Research Laboratory's Soldier Protection Sciences Branch with the Weapons and Material Research Directorate, highlights projects underway to understand how the Soldier responds to accelerative loading injuries like what would happen in a mine-blast event. In those events, Soldiers would be subjected to very high accelerations for short periods of time. ARL's research looks to better engineer and design seats and the protective systems to prevent injuries to the spinal cord or the leg which would be debilitating for the Soldier." (Produced by T'Jae Gibson and Larry Shank, ARL Public Affairs Office)

buglerbilly
21-08-13, 06:41 PM
UK’s protected mobility fleet conversion to be completed by mid-2016

21 August 2013 - 14:17 by Tim Fish in London



The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has announced a competition for a £40-60 million contract to convert its protected mobility vehicles to fit into Force 2020 structures by mid-2016.

Announcing the tender on 21 August, the MoD said the contract would ‘provide fleet conversion services for the army's Protected Mobility (PM) fleet of vehicles to achieve the correct variant mix to meet the requirements of the Army 2020 (A2020) Force Development Strategy’.

The vehicles to be converted include all variants of the Mastiff, Ridgback and Wolfhound. A contract decision is due by 31 January 2014 and the work will be completed by 1 August 2016.

The MoD said that current deliverables include: converting the Mastiff Troop Carrying Variant (MAS TCV) to Mastiff Enhanced Communications Variant (MAS ECV); the Ridgback Troop Carrying Variant (RBK TCV) to Ridgback Command Variant (RBK CV); Wolfhound Explosive Ordinance Disposal (WHD EOD) variant to the Wolfhound Military Working Dog (WHD MWD) variant; and Mastiff 1 to Mastiff 2.

Work to be performed by the contractor includes the design, manufacture and fitment of vehicle conversion kits; providing a Fleet Conversion Delivery Plan; designing and developing hardware and software; providing an Integrated Logistics Support (ILS)/Through Life Support (TLS) impact report for the converted fleet; rectifying existing defects requiring repair discovered during conversion; and including modification kits as part of the vehicle conversions.

The contract notification highlighted that the Cougar platform is subject to US ITAR and therefore companies must get clearance from the US State Department by the end of November this year before the issue of an invitation to tender (ITT).

A minimum of three companies and a maximum of five will be invited to tender. Requests to participate must be received by 26 September and ITTs will be issued to selected candidates on 22 November.

Affordability is the highest priority for the MoD. It stated that while the contract ‘may be suitable for economic operators that are small or medium enterprises (SMEs)’, the contract ‘will be awarded on the basis of the most economically advantageous tender’.

buglerbilly
23-08-13, 03:21 AM
Special Ops Command Announces $560M Award for Critical New Vehicle

Aug. 22, 2013 - 06:39PM

By PAUL McLEARY


(General Dynamics)

Also touted under the name of FLYER..........now where have I heard that name before? :D

In one of the dwindling number of domestic new build ground vehicle contracts available to the US defense industry, the US Special Operations Command today awarded General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems a contract worth at least $562 million its Ground Mobility Vehicle 1.1 (GMV) program.

The special ops command has said that it wants to buy 1,297 GMVs to replace the current 1,072 Humvee-based GMVs it has in its inventory. Defense News reported back in May that SOCOM had already planned to spend about $24 million on the program in fiscal 2014 for the first 101 vehicles, at a price tag of at $245,000 per vehicle.

Barring any protests, the loss will come as a bitter pill for current GMV-maker AM General and Navistar International, companies who are looking for more business at a time when the buys of Humvees and MRAPs have ended. Oshkosh Defense was eliminated from the competition in January, after which it filed a protest which was then withdrawn in April.

Requirements documents released last year said that the GMV would have to weigh less than 7,000 pounds, have the ability to carry up to seven passengers and be transportable in an M/CH-47 Chinook helicopter.

In today’s notice about the award, the government said that it plans on spending about $14 million in already allocated fiscal 2012 and 2013 budgets for research, test and evaluation on the GMV.

Final deliveries of all GMVs are expected to be complete by September 2020.

SOCOM has also said that it’s in the market for an even smaller vehicle that could fit in the back of a V-22 Osprey. SOCOM released a request for proposals on April 5 for the program, which calls for a lightly armored vehicle that can roll out of the back of an Osprey and begin firing mounted weapons within 60 seconds.

Funding for that program would kick off in the 2015 budget SOCOM officials announced this spring, and that industry has already started to submit its plans to meet the requirement. The Air Force special operation command will begin doing combat evaluations of prototypes in 2014.

buglerbilly
23-08-13, 04:05 AM
General Dynamics Wins $562 Million SOCOM Truck Deal

By Brendan McGarry Thursday, August 22nd, 2013 6:44 pm



General Dynamics Corp. won a contract potentially valued at $562 million to supply U.S. Special Operations Command with new four-by-four trucks.

The Defense Department on Thursday announced the award for the so-called Ground Mobility Vehicle, or GMV, program. The notice didn’t say how many trucks the command plans to buy, though the number was previously estimated at about 1,300. The funding also covers spare parts, training and an electronic communications suite.

The Falls Church, Va.-based tank-maker beat out companies such as Humvee-maker AM General LLC, based in Sound Bend, Ind., and truck-maker Navistar International Corp., based in Lisle, Ill. for the seven-year deal. Much of the work will be performed in Ladson, S.C., where General Dynamics’ Force Protection unit is located.

“This is an important contract,” Rob Doolittle, a company spokesman, said in a telephone interview. “The SOCOM community is an important customer for us and this expands our relationship with them.”

The vehicle must carry as many as seven passengers, weigh less than 7,000 pounds unloaded and be transportable in a CH-47 Chinook helicopter. The truck must also be able to fire its weapon in less than a minute upon driving off the twin-rotor aircraft.

General Dynamics may also benefit from international sales of the vehicle, or a similar version of it, especially in the Middle East. Countries such as Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait have expressed interest in upgrading their fleets of armored trucks.

SOCOM now uses a version of the iconic Humvee, which entered Army service in 1985 and whose vulnerability to roadside blasts was exposed during the U.S.-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

U.S. military vehicle programs face an uncertain future since the March 1 start of automatic budget cuts known as sequestration and last year’s strategic shift by the Pentagon away from the ground wars of the past decade and toward threats in the Asia-Pacific region.

buglerbilly
23-08-13, 02:30 PM
The Flyer vehicle above loos different to the ones in the previous thread because it has the add-on armour and doors, etc. - see below..............

buglerbilly
23-08-13, 02:44 PM
Colombian Army Acquires 28 Additional Commando Armored Personnel Carriers

(Source: Textron Inc.; issued August 22, 2013)


Earlier version with crew-fed .50cal

NEW ORLEANS, LA --- Textron Marine & Land Systems (TM&LS) announced today a $31.6 million contract award from the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM) to provide 28 Commando Advanced Armored Personnel Carriers (APCs), with 40mm/.50 cal remote turrets, to the Colombian Army (COLAR).

Initial APC deliveries to the U.S. Army, for shipping to Colombia, are expected to begin in November, with all vehicles scheduled to be completed and transferred by April 2014.

The contract also includes repair services on two damaged Armored Personnel Carriers in the COLAR's inventory, which consists of 39 Commando Advanced APCs in operation with its Armored Cavalry units. These repairs will coincide with vehicle support service work on COLAR APCs awarded to TM&LS earlier this year.

Since fielding its APCs in May 2010, the COLAR has employed them extensively while combating internal revolutionary forces in Colombia. These vehicles have provided the mobility, protection and firepower needed to meet all COLAR tactical armored vehicle requirements.

"Our Colombian Army customer values the performance, operator protection and reliability they have experienced with our Commando APCs during more than three years of demanding operations," said Textron Marine & Land Systems Senior Vice President and General Manager Tom Walmsley. "We're pleased to be growing this relationship and providing the Colombian Army with this important asset for its Cavalry units."

The Commando Advanced APC is an extended version of the Armored Security Vehicle, combat proven by the U.S. Army and other militaries in locations including Afghanistan and Iraq for more than 10 years. The APC's additional two feet in length and six inches in internal height allow greater troop carrying capacity. These vehicles offer excellent on-road and off-road mobility, enabling them to operate in urban, jungle, desert and mountainous terrain. Crew protection is reinforced with a V-shaped hull bottom and 360-degree protection from direct fire.

Rigorously tested and proven in the toughest environments, the Commando family of vehicles offers a range of protection options, unmatched on-road/off-road mobility and ample firepower. TM&LS produces four lines of Commando four-wheeled vehicles - Commando Utility, Commando Advanced, Commando Select and Commando Elite.

As an end-to-end armored vehicle provider, TM&LS offers customers a wide range of Commando products and services. Within the Commando family of vehicle lines, TM&LS has recently developed an enhanced recapitalization solution for HMMWVs, a 4x4 mortar vehicle, and command and control integration. Coordinated logistics support ensures proper fielding, training, maintenance and related services throughout each vehicle's life cycle.

Textron Marine & Land Systems designs, produces and supports advanced wheeled combat vehicles and cutting-edge maritime craft used by U.S. and international armed forces, as well as civilian entities around the globe. Its Commando family of armored vehicles offers a full range of vehicle options delivering enhanced survivability, mobility, lethality and sustainability. Textron Marine & Land Systems is an operating unit of Textron Inc.

-ends-

Wolftrap
23-08-13, 04:27 PM
Still only 40mm and .50 and nothing with a heavier punch ...

buglerbilly
23-08-13, 05:24 PM
For the anti-FARC and druggie stuuf they mostly do perhaps not..........mind you a 30mm cannon would go amiss............there is also the version with a 120mm mortar and 82 rounds they haven't orderd yet, this might have more purpose for their needs.

buglerbilly
27-08-13, 02:56 PM
More on this...........

GD’s GMV selected for USSOCOM vehicle

27 August 2013 - 12:59 by Tim Fish in London



General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems (GDOTS) has been awarded a $562 million contract for the purchase of Ground Mobility Vehicles 1.1. for the US Special Forces Command (USSOCOM).

A spokesperson from GDOTS told Shephard that their vehicle, called the Flyer GMV 1.1, is a ‘modified configuration’ of the Flyer Advanced Light Strike Vehicle (ALSV) platform that will be provided to meet USSOCOM’s 4x4 tactical wheeled vehicle requirement.

Announced on 22 August, the DoD stated that the contract will last seven years out to September 2020 and an initial delivery order will be issued with the contract award funded with $9 million of research and development funds and $5 million of procurement funds under fiscal 2012 and 2013.

The company beat competition in the final stage from AM General with its GMV and Navistar International offering of its Special Operations Tactical Vehicle (SOTV).

There were six original contenders for the GMV 1.1 programme, which also included: Northrop Grumman with its Medium Assault Vehicle – Light (MAV-L); HDT Global’s Storm SRTV; the Oshkosh Special Purpose All-Terrain Vehicle (S-ATV).

USSOCOM wants up to 1,300 vehicles, which must be transportable in a Chinook helicopter. The Flyer ASLV can carry a payload of 3,500lb, ballistic protection up to B6, a top speed of 85 mph and a range of about 450 miles.

USSOCOM currently uses a heavy variant of the Humvee, built by AM General, and wants to replace this vehicle at a rate of about 200 per year. SOCOM’s budget for 2014 has $24 million slated for an initial delivery of about 101 vehicles.

This programme is seen as a precursor to the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programme that will see the US Army and USMC procure more than 50,000 vehicles.

buglerbilly
27-08-13, 03:13 PM
The losing contenders..............

NG's MAV-L uncovered and covered.................





HDT Global Storm SRTV...........only view seen.........this is a version chosen for a USAF program..........



Oshkosh Special Purpose All-Terrain Vehicle (S-ATV).........

buglerbilly
28-08-13, 05:18 PM
Army, Marine Corps Take Delivery of JLTVs for User Testing

(Source: US Army; issued August 27, 2013)

WASHINGTON --- All 66 Joint Light Tactical Vehicle prototypes have been delivered to the military so that 14 months of testing can begin at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., and Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz. Full-scale testing is scheduled to begin next week, according to the JLTV joint program office.

Each of the three vendors competing in the current research and development program delivered a total of 22 vehicles and six trailers to the two locations, said Col. John Cavedo, the joint project manager. The vendors are Oshkosh Defense, which builds the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle and others; Lockheed Martin, which produces the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System; and AM General, which builds the Humvee.

While this marks the beginning of full-scale testing, a certain amount of testing in the current phase has already been done, he added, pointing to: more than 400 ballistic and blast tests on armor testing samples; underbody blast testing; and over 1,000 miles in shakedown testing.

But next week Soldiers from the Army Test and Evaluation Command and personnel from the Defense Department's Office of Test and Evaluation will put the vehicles through realistic and rigorous field testing during a 14-month-long government performance testing period, Cavedo said.

Once that is completed in fiscal year 2015, the Army and Marine Corps look forward to awarding a production contract to a single vendor for nearly 55,000 vehicles.

The Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV, fills a big gap in vehicle needs for the Army and the Marine Corps, Cavedo said. In the 20th century, the strategy was to build heavily armored vehicles for front-line service and lighter vehicles such as Humvees for rear-area duty.

But 9/11 changed all that, he said. Battle lines are now blurred, and there is need for a vehicle that can carry a lot of gear and personnel, and capitalize on emerging networks. Such a vehicle must also be heavily armored and have plenty of speed, maneuverability and power.

According to the Army's Equipment Modernization Strategy, "the Army is moving forward with developing the JLTV to fill the capability gaps in the light vehicle fleet by carefully balancing performance, payload and protection. The JLTV provides the same level of protection as the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected All-Terrain Vehicle, or M-ATV, better network integration than the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle and better mobility and transportability than the M-ATV."

The price tag had to be right too, he added. In fiscal year 2011 dollars, each vehicle coming off the assembly line could not exceed $250,000.

"We've insisted on that," he said. "So the program is on schedule and on budget."

Cavedo said he sees the testing progressing on schedule. He also thinks members of Congress see the critical need for the vehicle.

Long-term plans include the first Army units receiving JLTVs by fiscal year 2018 and all 49,000 JLTVs delivered to the Army by sometime in the 2030 decade, he said. The Marines will acquire a total of 5,500.

-ends-

buglerbilly
02-09-13, 02:33 PM
Patria Launches A New Vehicle Concept at DSEI 2013 in London

(Source: Patria; issued Sept. 2, 2013)

No idea what it is? The video for the show doesn't say anything either..............

Patria is a forerunner of the armoured wheeled vehicles and will launch a new vehicle concept at DSEI 2013 in London in September 10th-13th 2013. Patria will showcase its high-end products and know-how in armoured wheeled vehicles. In addition Patria’s innovations in ELINT systems and data links will be featured.

DSEi is one of the biggest and the most international defence and security events in the world. DSEI is held at the ExCel Exhibition Centre in London.

Patria’s stand is located at N6-160.

-ends-

buglerbilly
05-09-13, 12:43 AM
AM General and Navistar Protest SOCOM Vehicle Contract

Sep. 4, 2013 - 04:07PM

By PAUL McLEARY


General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems was awarded a contract in April to build ground mobility vehicles for US Special Operations Command. (General Dynamics)

WASHINGTON — US vehicle manufacturers AM General and Navistar are protesting US Special Operations Command’s decision to award a contract to build ground mobility vehicles to General Dynamics, Defense News has learned.

The command on Aug. 21 awarded a contract worth at least $562 million to GD for the Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV) 1.1 program, a critical lightweight vehicle that will replace the 1,000 Humvee variants in use by special operators.

The company beat out AM General and Navistar, all of whom were battling to build 1,297 GMVs costing about $245,000 per vehicle. The protest was lodged on Tuesday, according to sources.

Requirements documents released last year said that the GMV would have to weigh less than 7,000 pounds, be able to carry up to seven passengers and be transportable in an M/CH-47 Chinook helicopter.

AM General declined to comment. Navistar spokeswoman Lauren McFarland said “we have requested a review of certain issues that have been identified.” SOCOM did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

The protests show just how critical the program is for contractors, now that new-build programs are becoming few and far between. Both AM General and Navistar are looking to drum up business as purchases of Humvees and mine-resistant vehicles have ended.

Oshkosh Defense was eliminated from the competition in January, after which it filed a protest. The protest was withdrawn in April.

Last August, Navistar also protested the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle award going to AM General, Oshkosh and Lockheed Martin, but withdrew the protest three days later.

buglerbilly
05-09-13, 05:48 AM
Wednesday, September 4, 2013 10:02 PM

Polish Company Germaz unveils AMRV Armoured Multi-Role Vehicles G04 and G10 at MSPO 2013.

At MSPO 2013, the Polish Company D.S. Germaz unveils a new range of light 4x4 tactical vehicle, with the AMRV (Armoured Multi-Role Vehicle) G04 and G10. According to the manufacturer, the design and with its armour protection, the AMRV vehicle is in the category of MRAP (Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected).


AMRV G04 4x4 armoured vehicle personnel carrier at MSPO 2013.

The ARMV G04 looks very similar to the German Dingo 2. The AMRV G04 is based on the chassis of the Mercedes-Benz UNIMOG U5000 (4 × 4) light cross-country truck. The engine compartment is at the front, the heavily armoured safety crew compartment is in the centre and the cargo/load area is at the rear.

The AMRV G04 provides a ballistic protection level 2 STANAG 4569A, and can be upgraded with add-on armour to reach the level 3 or 4. AMRV monocoque body - armoured capsule / citadel protecting the crew against gunfire, explosions, and the roll-over of the vehicle. The “diamond” shape of side walls increase capsule protection level against ballistic threats. The bottom of citadel is protected by integrated V- shaped anti-mine deflector.

The driver is seated front left with the vehicle commander to his right and a further two to four personnel in the rear. To the front of the commander and driver is a large bulletproof window which provides the same level of protection as the remainder of the crew module.

In each side of the vehicle is a large forward-opening door with a bulletproof window in its upper part. The occupants are provided with individual seats which have been designed to absorb shock if the vehicle should run over a mine.

At the MSPO 2013, the AMRV G04 was fitted with a remote controlled weapon station armed with a 7.62mm machine gun.


D.S. Germaz AMRV G10 armoured vehicle personnel carrier

The other version of AMRV, the G10, use the same chassis and armour technology as the G04 variant, but the vehicle is able to carry 10 fully equipped soldiers.

The AMRV G10 provides high level of protection against both anti-tank and anti-personnel mines, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), as well as artillery splinters and gun fire.

In the development of the AMRV range, Germaz Company used the state-of-the-art design, materials and technologies and work with the Wroclaw University of Technology and Daimler AG.

The use of a Unimog chassis for the AMRV ensures both outstanding performance and low life-cycle costs and due to its popularity enables user to reduce the requirements for training drivers and mechanics. The low-maintenance and robust components provide considerable economic benefits.

The AMRV vehicles can be equipped with various types of weapons as open-top turrets or remote controlled weapon stations, armed with 7.62 mm or 12.7 mm machine guns or 40 mm automatic grenade launchers.

buglerbilly
06-09-13, 01:31 PM
JLTV Testing Begins, Program On Schedule, Budget

(Source: US Army; issued September 5, 2013)


Despite budget cuts and sequestration, the US Army plans to select the winning JLTV design by 2015, to have the first enter service in 2018 and to eventually buy over 50,000. (USA photo)

WASHINGTON --- Full-pace, full-scope testing of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle prototypes began Sept. 3 and will last for 14 months.

Each of the three vendors -- Oshkosh Defense, Lockheed Martin and AM General -- delivered 22 vehicles and six trailers for testing to three sites -- Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Yuma, Ariz. and Redstone Arsenal, Ala.

Rigorous reliability testing over various terrains and in different weather conditions and protection-related testing is being conducted, said Col. John Cavedo, the Joint Program Office manager, who spoke Sept. 4 during a JLTV webcast.

The program is still on track despite this year's sequestration and the continuation of continuing resolutions, but if budget issues are not resolved by next year, Cavedo said he could not rule out a slip in the schedule.

"We're doing everything we can to keep the program on track," he said, emphasizing the importance of the program to meeting asymmetrical threats like those experienced in Iraq and Afghanistan.

CLOSING CAPABILITIES GAP

Cavedo related an incident years ago at the Fulda Gap on the East-West German border. "My company commander pointed to the northeast and told me 'that's where the enemy will come from' and then turned around and said, 'that's the secure area in the rear where the friendly forces will be.'"

During Cold-War-era exercises, Humvees safely moved about the rear area while tanks and other heavily armored vehicles would maneuver in the battle-space. The Fulda Gap was considered by many to be the best line of approach for Soviet tanks moving west and south.

That notion of frontlines and rear area was no longer applicable after 9/11, he said. Humvees became vulnerable to improvised explosive devices no matter where they were. Up-armor was added for protection but the enemy adapted to that with more lethal explosives.

The added weight of the up-armor taxed the Humvees' performance and further limited its payload, which now included network gear. And, the Humvees were just getting old, with the first ones rolling off the assembly line about three decades ago.

Soldiers and Marines continued to be vulnerable so the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles were developed. These had good payload and protection and helped save many lives over the last six years, but performance was sacrificed and Soldiers could not move with speed and agility around the battlefield, especially in the difficult terrain in parts of Afghanistan, he said.

Furthermore, the heavier versions of the earlier MRAPs could not be moved around the battlefield by helicopter and required strategic lift, which in turn required adequate runways for these big cargo planes to take-off and land.

The sustainment cost for the MRAP program increased over time, he said, as more variants were developed by different vendors. Parts were not interchangeable and mechanics had to get follow-on training, he said.

The JLTV closed the capability gap, addressing "the iron-triangle of payload, performance and protection," he said. Its payload and protection is similar to an MRAP and its performance exceeds that of a Humvee.

ADAPTIBILITY & FLEXIBILITY

Besides addressing the "iron-triangle," Cavedo said the JLTV is designed to meet the needs of the commander for a variety of missions.

The commander can decide what level of protection JLTV needs for the mission, he said, pointing out that armor kits will be available for vehicles going into harm's way. Also, some of the JLTVs will be equipped with heavy weapons including TOW missile systems, while others can be used as light, utility vehicles.

Other kits include command and control and network gear. He said JLTV "plug and play" open-architecture technology allows for future networks and electronic devices to be installed without a vehicle redesign.

While different vehicles will have different kits, all vehicles come equipped with automatic fire extinguishers, multiple egress options, fuel-tank fire suppression systems and combat locks.

Powering the 21,000-pound gross weight JLTV and whatever kits and trailers are added on is a 300-horsepower fuel-efficient diesel engine. JLTVs also will be able to tow the thousands of legacy trailers that are still useable.

HOLDING COSTS DOWN

"We've managed to hold cost down by promoting better competition between vendors, incentivizing productivity and conducting an analysis of alternatives," he said. By "analysis of alternatives," he means ordering the right number of kits and mission packages. "We don't want surplus kits stockpiled in warehouses across the country."

Incentivizing productivity, he explained, means that after giving the original equipment manufacturer, or OEM, the specs, like protection, speed, weight and so on, it is up to them to determine how it's built and what the tradeoffs are.

He provided an example. Besides armor kits, the basic JLTV requires a certain level of protection, he said. There might be very exotic metals out there that are lightweight and offer exceptional protection, but the cost involved would be astronomical. So a tradeoff might be reached where steel or aluminum is used to keep the cost down but still meet the basic requirements. To be competitive, however, the thickness or type of material used might exceed basic standards but be within a reasonable price range.

Tradeoffs like this apply to the power and transmission features and to everything else on the vehicle, he said. They're trying to be as innovative and competitive as possible with the other OEMs, yet they must stay below the $250,000 assembly-line figure.

There are other ways cost has been controlled. Instead of requiring each OEM to supply 35 vehicles, they were required to provide 22 for the testing phase, he said. That number is reasonable and adequate for an effective evaluation.

Also, instead of a cost-plus type contract, the JLTV is on a firm-fixed price contract. "In the past, the production price was set after down-select," he said. "Our intent was to set production prices during competition so as we go forward into the competitive down-select we'll have production prices set at that point and not negotiated for the years out."

TIMELINE

Source-selection evaluation will start in early 2015 and conclude by July of that year when a single vendor will be selected.

At that time, 2,000 vehicles will be produced and be tested for three years with the focus on fine-tuning the assembly line, full-up system testing and so on.

Full-scale production will begin in fiscal year 2018 with the ratio of organic to contract work determined by the third quarter of FY15.

By 2018, the first Army brigade will roll with new JLTVs, he said.

Production will total 49,000 JLTVs for the Army and 5,500 for the Marines, with the production cycle ending sometime in the 2030s.

Kits will initially be produced by the selected OEM but follow-on kits might use a different vendor, he said.

In conclusion, Cavedo said the JLTV comes at the right time at the right cost, and is the perfect match to the Army's shift to the Pacific, regional alignment strategy and meets the requirements of the Defense Strategic Guidance of 2012 and the Army's 2014 Equipment Modernization Plan.

-ends-

buglerbilly
06-09-13, 02:52 PM
DSEI 2013: XL Sherpa APC to be unveiled

06 September 2013 - 14:38 by Tim Fish in London



An enlarged version of the Sherpa 4x4 APC built by Renault Trucks Defense (RTD) will on display for the first time at the DSEI exhibition in London from 10 September.

The Sherpa APC XL is an extended model of the existing APC but designed for security missions with a wider internal volume.

Charles Maisonneuve, head of external communications at RTD, told Shephard that compared to the standard APC, the XL variant has 11m3 of internal space compared to 10m3; five doors instead of the three on the APC and it is slightly heavier at 10,9t up from 10,2t. The XL is also taller at 2.53m instead of 2.46m.

‘The idea is to have more place for security equipment (shield and so on) for the crew; [the XL] version of Sherpa APC has been designed especially for the South American market but can be marketed elsewhere,’ he said.

The original APC model has ‘already been sold to an Asian country, two Middle Eastern countries – Qatar and another one – and a central Europe country,’ he added.

buglerbilly
06-09-13, 03:50 PM
DSEI 2013: First showing for modular ROSY

06 September 2013 - 15:36 by Tim Fish in London



A smaller variant of Rheinmetall’s Rapid Obscurant System (ROSY) smoke protection system known as the ROSY_Mod is being launched at DSEi.

The latest version is designed for small weapon stations, light vehicles and special operations vehicles. The company said that this system can be integrated directly onto a vehicle without a launcher so that it is undetectable.

Dr Jan-Phillipp Weisswange from Rheinmetall told Shephard: ‘I think the best way to describe the difference between ROSY_L and ROSY_Mod is that a magazine of a ROSY_L launcher has integrated a number of ROSY_Mod launchers. A single ROSY_Mod launcher can be integrated camouflaged i.e. in a bumper of a car, much more easily.’

The ROSY_L (Land) system designed for larger vehicles was selected by the Bundeswehr in June under a €8.5 million contract for installation kits for 500 tactical and logistical vehicles and weapon stations and 50,000 rounds of 40mm multispectral smoke ammunition.

The company said that within a second the ROSY_L system can produce a large-area, multispectral interruption of the line of sight that shields even moving vehicles with a dynamic, long-lasting smoke screen.

ROSY_L offers 360° protection and with screening in the visual and infrared spectrums, including integrated IR jamming and decoying effects, ROSY_L can protect against with all types of TV-, EO-, IR-, IIR-, laser- and SACLOS-guided weapons.

‘ROSY_L can make a significant contribution to improving force protection in high-risk areas of operation such as Afghanistan. The Bundeswehr plans to use the system primarily for equipping lightweight wheeled and logistical vehicles, thus bridging a special capabilities gap in deployed operations,’ the company stated.

ROSY_L includes a manual control unit and from one to four ROSY launchers per vehicle. An adapter means the system can be mounted on vehicles easily with ‘one click’ and there is no need for tools. The modular nature of the system means it can directly linked to the sensor suite of the carrier vehicle’s computer systems. Different ammunition variants can be individually selected to allow the optimum positioning of smoke screens.

Rheinmetall also offers the ROSY_N (Naval) for fast attack craft, patrol vessels and rigid hull inflatable boats.

buglerbilly
06-09-13, 04:13 PM
DSEI 2013: Challenges face armoured vehicle sector

06 September 2013 - 16:01 by Joyce de Thouars in London



The global market for armoured vehicles is expected to decline slightly in the coming decade, a market analysis by Shephard has revealed.

The value of the 2013 global market for armoured vehicles has been forecast as being worth between $12.5 billion and $25 billion, with analysts predict that the market will either shrink slightly or grow at only a modest pace in the coming ten years.

The withdrawal of ISAF troops from Afghanistan, as well as shrinking defence budgets in North America and Europe – and with US sequestration casting a long shadow – are negatively impacting the market.

Governments are continuing to focus on the reduction of land forces while there is declining political willingness to send troops abroad. The US shift of focus to the Asia Pacific region is further expected to drive investment in long-range stealth and maritime capabilities rather than land platforms.

Armoured vehicles will, however, remain a vital part of military operations providing ground forces with enhanced capabilities in terms of protection, firepower and mobility. Also, despite the declining demand, the US clearly remains the biggest market followed by Europe, where demand is driven by modernisation efforts of Eastern Europe.

Emerging markets in Asia, the Middle East and Latin America offer opportunities for defence companies to offset declining sales in North America and Europe. Demand is driven by internal and external security threats, territorial disputes and modernisation efforts undertaken by the armed forces.

Growth is also foreseen in Africa, where industry analysts expect governments to spend $20 billion on armoured vehicles in the coming decade with Algeria being the biggest market.

On a global level, light- and medium weight armoured vehicles are expected to continue to be most in demand.

A report on military vehicles from Forecast International indicates that 8400 light tracked vehicles and 18,634 light wheeled vehicles will be globally produced from 2013-2022, representing a value of respectivey $18.1 billion and $8.4 billion. The company further projects a global production of 5200 MBTs worth $23.3 billion over the forecast period.

Despite some promising opportunities, budget constraints result in affordability being a key factor in the procurement process.

Modern armed vehicles are further required to be modular, mobile and adaptable, with research being driven by the need to find the perfect balance between protection and mobility as well as developing methods to reduce operational and through-life support costs.

buglerbilly
10-09-13, 03:09 AM
September 9, 2013 at 17:49

US Army Embarks on the Testing of a Hybrid Ultra Light Vehicle (ULV)

Posted by Tamir Eshel



The U.S. Army’s latest “research prototype vehicle” has entered advanced testing phase with the Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC). The new vehicle known as the Ultra Light Vehicle (ULV) was built as a Concept Vehicle for TARDEC’s Detroit Arsenal. The new hybrid tactical vehicle targets safety, fuel-efficiency and versatility. It was developed in the past 16 months using commercial technologies. Final testing is beginning on the ULV vehicle platform with evaluating its capability to support Soldiers on missions across a full spectrum of mobility challenges while keeping occupants safe and using fuel efficiently.

Army researchers have designed the ULV to meet a wide range of challenges by making it fuel efficient, versatile and survivable in nearly any environment.

Funded by the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), the ULV project team is developing and building three identical lightweight tactical research prototype vehicles emphasizing survivability for occupants and meeting four research objectives:

■ Payload – 4,500 lbs
■ Performance – at 14,000 lbs curb weight
■ Protection – comparable to the currently fielded Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected (MRAP) vehicles
■ Price – $250,000 each in a hypothetical 5,000-unit production run

TARDEC’s Ground System Survivability group partnered with non-traditional defense contractors bringing the engineering expertise of both to the project. In only 16 months, the team moved from design to prototype.

“The Army’s approach was to create synergistic survivability,” explained TARDEC GSS Associate Director Steve Knott. “Soft deliverables — such as data and lessons learned — and hard deliverables — such as test assets and spare automotive components — will help shape, inform and support tactical vehicle programs, technology demonstrator efforts and/or TARDEC Innovation Projects to maximize the overall return on investment.”

The team produced three vehicles: two will be used for mobility, mine blast and ballistic survivability testing and the third is moving into TARDEC’s Ground Systems Power and Energy Laboratory (GSPEL) for mobility and fuel efficiency testing. Results are expected to be available in early 2014.

Highlights of ULV’s powertrain, design, communications and protection, focusing on mobility and survivability, include:

Powertrain – With two electric motors (front and rear) the ULV’s hybrid powertrain improves both mobility and survivability. By eliminating the need for a driveshaft, the underbody can be designed to perform well in a blast event. And either of the electric motors can power the vehicle, providing redundancy. A lightweight diesel engine powers the electric motors and also enables:

• Immediate launch
• Stealth drive
• Silent watch
• Exportable power generation
• High torque at low/near zero speeds
• Improved fuel economy

Design – ULV’s final design was developed by lead contractor Hardwire LLC. The cab provides more interior space than similarly equipped tactical vehicles. Remote-mounted and remote-controlled vehicle electronics reduce HVAC loads and create space. “Clamshell” front and rear doors open away from the B-pillar creating a protected area for Soldiers to exit.

“The cab is designed to have seven egress points facilitated by quick-release and removable components, stowage space for personnel and mission-specific items and 360-degree situational awareness through front- and rear-mounted ultra wide-angle thermal imagers,” explained TARDEC engineer Vladimir Gendlin.

Communications – ULV features lower-weight Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) technologies focused on warfighter needs.

Survivability/Ballistic Protection – The hybrid design allows for a “clean underbody” through the elimination of various automotive components potentially allowing for blast-mitigation technologies to perform uninhibited during a blast event. This design provides added opportunities to integrate various blast-mitigating kits under the hull for higher threat levels. Interior technologies include a crushable floating floor system that decouples the crew’s feet and legs from the steel hull and absorbs energy, adjustable stroking seats, five-point restraint systems, and spatial accommodations to mitigate head im


A 3/4 front view of the ULV. Photo via TARDEC


the ULV project team is developing and building three identical lightweight tactical research prototype vehicles emphasizing survivability for occupants. Photo via TARDEC

pacts and flail injuries. ULV also utilizes high-strength steels and advanced composite materials offering lightweight ballistic protection from a number of threats to include a newly developed transparent ceramic armor system to keep the vehicle’s overall weight down.