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geof
12-04-11, 12:34 PM
.. Are those G-Wagons entering service yet ... or have I been asleep again ..

buglerbilly
12-04-11, 01:16 PM
Should be................


Light/lightweight capability: A critical design review has been completed on a number of theG-Wagon variants and 11 prototypes have been manufactured, delivered and accepted. Verification and validation is currently being progressed with batch production to start in September 2010.

Key activities for 2010-2011 will be the receipt of the first vehicles into service, establishment of the through-life support capability and the training of vehicle operators and maintenance personnel.

buglerbilly
12-04-11, 02:06 PM
Oshkosh Defense Introduces SandCat TPV in Latin America


The SandCat Tactical Protector Vehicle. (Photo: Oshkosh Defense)

Oshkosh's high-performance vehicle to be showcased at LAAD 2011

08:01 GMT, April 12, 2011 OSHKOSH, Wis. | Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, will showcase the SandCat Tactical Protector Vehicle (TPV) in Latin America for the first time at LAAD Defence & Security 2011, April 12-15 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The SandCat TPV, part of Oshkosh’s light-payload vehicle portfolio, offers Latin American countries a protected, highly maneuverable vehicle for use in law enforcement, border patrol and security operations, among others.

“The SandCat TPV can provide security forces with swift mobility and optimal protection, whether used in combating crime in tightly confined urban areas or patrolling borders in remote, off-road landscapes,” said Serge Buchakjian, senior vice president and general manager of International Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “Our company has more than 90 years of experience designing, manufacturing and sustaining world-class vehicles for governments and militaries around the world, and we can capitalize on this experience to help meet security needs in Latin America. In our inaugural LAAD exhibit, we are pleased to showcase the Oshkosh SandCat TPV, a top-of-the-line vehicle built to defend passengers from dangerous threats in a wide range of environments.”

Oshkosh Defense uses a collaborative, integrated approach to meet customers’ needs, from vehicle design and production to training and aftermarket sustainment. The company has produced more than 85,000 military-class trucks and trailers, with vehicle payloads that cover the complete light-to-heavy spectrum. Oshkosh vehicles have been proven on severe off-road terrain and against a variety of modern threats, including use by militaries, special forces units, and government agencies around the world. Oshkosh’s advanced technologies deliver capabilities such as extensive off-road mobility, exportable power, autonomous operation and integrated on-board diagnostics.

Oshkosh’s aftermarket solutions cover the complete spectrum of vehicle life-cycle support, including training services, instruction manuals, maintenance and repairs, parts supply, and fleet restoration services. Oshkosh Field Service Representatives (FSR) travel globally to ensure vehicles and personnel are at peak operational readiness. The company’s robust operator and maintenance training services provide systems-level expertise on the platforms and technologies they support, with classes offered at the Oshkosh Product Training Center, regional service centers around the world or in-theater. Additionally, Oshkosh’s parts-supply network is available 24/7 to provide instant access to spare and repair parts for all vehicle makes and models.

The SandCat TPV is part of the Oshkosh SandCat family of vehicles and can be configured to meet individual performance, protection and payload needs. The vehicle’s armor system can be customized based on the threat level and mission profile. Seating capacity can be adjusted to accommodate four to nine passengers. The vehicle also can be equipped with standard or customized storage, and is typically integrated with a wide array of weapons and communications systems. The SandCat TPV’s compact design, combined with an 18-inch vertical step capability and 42-foot curb-to-curb turning circle, enables mobility in both tight urban settings and rugged rural landscapes.

The SandCat family of vehicles also includes the base vehicle, Special Operations Vehicle (SOV) and Mine-Resistant Light Patrol Vehicle (M-LPV). These variants are based on the same lightweight, highly maneuverable platform for eased maintenance and repairs worldwide. Oshkosh has received orders for the SandCat from Mexico, Sweden, Bulgaria, Canada, Nigeria and Israel.

buglerbilly
14-04-11, 01:04 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

More And Better Dingo 2s For Bundeswehr

Posted by Nicholas Fiorenza at 4/13/2011 10:46 AM CDT

The Bundesamt für Wehrtechnik und Beschaffung (BWB), Germany's Federal Office for Defense Technology and Procurement, today ordered 39 more Dingo 2 protected vehicles from Krauss-Maffei Wegmann (KMW). The vehicles will be delivered to the German army by November 2011 for deployment to Afghanistan.


KMW photo

The vehicles are the latest version, the Dingo 2 GE, equipped with the FLW 100/FLW 200 light remote weapon station, which can be operated from inside the vehicle, even at high speed or in rough terrain, according to KMW. The vehicles also have a new hardtop in the rear, replacing the canvas cover of the storage space of earlier versions of the Dingo.

buglerbilly
14-04-11, 01:58 AM
LAAD 2011: Gladiador ‘light tank’ nears production

April 13, 2011



See the LAAD photo review for more shots of this vehicle................

Brazilian firm InbraFiltro Group is confident of securing a launch customer for its Gladiador 4x4 light armoured vehicle by the end of 2011, the company has told Shephard.

Displaying the final configuration of the vehicle for the first time at LAAD 2011, the company expects the high levels of regional interest for the vehicle, which it describes as a ‘light tank on wheels' (LTOW), to soon translate to a production contract.

The vehicle was developed to meet a stated request by the Brazilian Army and the company is now negotiating to start production at its Sao Paolo facility.

InbraFiltro Group business director, José Carlos Sampaio Alves, said the army had a requirement for some 350 light armoured vehicles but this number may be reduced due to budgetary pressures.

According to company literature, the army evaluated the Gladiador against similar-sized international vehicles, with the LTOW gaining the best result in the categories of weight/performance, capacity/armouring and mobility/consumption.

Alves said other armed forces and security agencies in Latin America, Africa and Asia had already shown interest in the vehicle. In addition, the Rio de Janeiro police planned to trial the vehicle in coming months, using the variant that was developed for the army.

‘This will certainly be a landmark year for the Gladiador where most of these decisions will be made,' Alves said.

He said the ‘100% Brazilian' vehicle had been designed from the ground up, with Brazilian company Agrale Industry responsible for the chassis and mechanical engineering.

Offered for $350,000 for the basic version, the seven ton vehicle has capacity for a driver and seven passengers, provides level four protection and has a top speed of 130km/h.

Beyond the Gladiador, the company used the show to highlight its filtration systems and personal protection products. It is also contracted by Helibras to provide composite armouring for the Brazilian armed forces EC725 transport helicopters.

Tony Skinner, Rio de Janeiro

buglerbilly
14-04-11, 01:59 AM
LAAD 2011: Paramount sees potential in regional market

April 13, 2011



As part of its aggressive pursuit of the armoured vehicle market relative newcomer Paramount Group announced at LAAD that two of its vehicles would be trialled by governments in the region and that it expected to see at least one procurement decision in the region in a matter of months.

The South African company is one of the largest privately-owned defence and aerospace companies in Africa and believes that its advanced armoured vehicles can be successful on the wider international stage. The company recently exhibited at IDEX in Abu Dhabi to access the Middle East Market and Latin America is seen as another logical area of interest.

'We are validating our business model. It's a global world and we think that there can also be globalisation in defence manufacturing,' CEO John Craig told Shephard.

The vehicles being trialled in South America are Maverick, an internal security vehicle designed for use by police and other law enforcement organisations, and the Marauder, an advanced mine protected armoured vehicle. 'We chose these two vehicles as the logical ones for this market. In terms of things that attract attention internal security vehicles are important as local law enforcement needs to up its game and increase capacity with a number of events of global significance in the next few years,' Craig stated.

Following the exhibition the vehicles will begin trials in Brazil and then will also be trialled by another country in the region. 'We will have to see where it takes us we may end up doing something of a roadshow in the region,' he added.

Company officials said that Paramount is already in discussion with Latin American governments about its armoured vehicle technology and the selected vehicles will be trialled by both defence forces and internal security forces. The company added that the successful outcome of these trials could lead to Paramount Group setting up manufacturing facilities in the region.

Craig sees the establishment of local manufacturing capability as one of the Paramount Group's key capabilities. The company proved its capability in this area by setting up a production line for its Marauder and Matador vehicles in Azerbaijan after a large order from the country.

Craig said the company continued to see a lot of value in the developing world market where smaller requirements may be more normal. 'We will always have customers in the developing world and if they only want 20 or 30 vehicles we won't say no. That is core to our business.'

Paramount's CEO stressed that in the last six years the company has past the test and become a fully operational developer and manufacturer of armoured vehicles. That success has been highlighted by the organisation of a separate vehicle division within the Paramount Group, which also specialises in defence electronics and aerospace products. 'We have the almost unique privilege of being a late entrant to the market,' Craig suggested.

That late entry allowed the company to start with a blank sheet and develop a product line for where it saw the real demands for both the security and defence markets. That started with a number of law enforcement vehicles and a range of mine protected vehicles before moving on to more sophisticated APCs.

Craig was keen to highlight the success of the company's recent exhibition of its Mbombe APC, renamed for the international market, at IDEX in February, alongside its local partner, International Golden Group. He said that the vehicle had a lot of interest from the United Arab Emirates government and that the company would be taking it back to the country to perform hot weather trials.

Darren Lake, Rio de Janeiro

buglerbilly
14-04-11, 01:04 PM
More on the additional Dingo 2's for the German Army.....................

German Army Orders Further Lifesavers DINGO 2

(Source: Krauss-Maffei Wegmann; issued April 13, 2011)



Krauss-Maffei Wegmann (KMW) has received an order for the assembly and delivery of 39 DINGO 2 in its most modern version, the DINGO 2 GE from the Federal Office for Defence and Procurement (BWB) in Koblenz.

The vice president of the BWB, Reinhard Schütte, and KMW COO Jürgen Weber, signed a corresponding contract in Koblenz today. KMW will deliver the vehicles to the army by November 2011. Shortly after they will be at the disposal of the Bundeswehr in Afghanistan.

“With a repeat order such as this one, the German Army emphasizes its trust in Krauss-Maffei Wegmann as a trustworthy partner which reacts quickly, flexibly and reliably to the demands of its customers,” said Jürgen Weber after the signing of the contract.

DINGO 2 – the best protection for dangerous missions

Meanwhile, almost 1000 DINGOs in different versions, from ambulances over NBC reconnaissance vehicles and mobile command posts to reconnaissance and patrol vehicles, are in service with six European nations.

The high level of protection has proven its worth during numerous terrorist assaults and has steadily protected the lives of the crew. The vehicles ordered offer the soldiers of the German Army the best protection available as well as highest mobility and vehicle payload, even under extreme conditions.

In order to be able to respond quickly and flexibly to changed demands on missions, the DINGO 2 will also come equipped with a light remote weapon station (RWS) of the type FLW 100/FLW 200. The vehicle crew is thereby capable of operating the weapon station precisely and effectively from within the protected interior of the vehicle, even at high speeds or in rough terrain.

An exterior identifying feature of the recently ordered DINGOs is the new hardtop at the rear of the vehicle, which replaces the common canvas cover of the storage space.

-ends-

buglerbilly
14-04-11, 02:09 PM
Iveco presents new Special Forces LMV


(Photo: Iveco Defence Vehicles)

09:13 GMT, April 14, 2011

Iveco Defence Vehicles is building on the remarkable commercial and operational success of its Light Multirole Vehicle (LMV) to develop a version dedicated to Special Forces operations. Currently deployed in Afghanistan by seven different nations, the LMV is well regarded by its users, and its high levels of protection and mobility have already saved numerous lives.

The decision to develop a Special Forces variant was supported by a number of SF units, enabling their specific operational requirements to be taken into consideration form the design phase. The result is a robust, mobile adaptable platform which is well placed to meet the demands of SF missions. After presenting a first prototype at IDET 2009 and DVD 2009, Iveco will now display the latest version of its SF LMV at IDET 2011.

The new model features the same well-proven drive train and running gear of the standard version, although its armoured cab has been stripped down to a minimum, providing optimum situational awareness and enabling rapid dismount. The vehicle benefits from the proven LMV chassis which ensures logistic commonality for those armies which already deploy the standard LMV. The 140 kW engine provides a power-to-weight ratio of about 20 kW/t and is coupled to a six speed automatic gearbox with hydro-dynamic coupling converter and transfer-box. The low profile of the rear of the vehicle allows unrestricted visibility and allows the use of weapons -over a 360 degree arc.

• On and off road mobility: LMV was specifically designed to provide the user with outstanding mobility and terrain accessibility. To this end, the vehicle incorporates design features such as independent suspension, central tyre inflation and ABS. This meets the key requirement for special operations teams of maintaining mobility in the most demanding conditions. On road, the LMV can reach over 110 km/h.

• Payload: The kerb weight of the SF vehicle, in the proposed configuration with several optional included, is 5,100 kg, providing an impressive mission payload of some 2,000 kgs. The vehicle features a low set, open rear cargo compartment which can be adapted to different layouts depending on the user’s specifications. Additional fuel or water tanks are present, as well as stowage solutions for individual equipment and weapon systems that can be adapted case by case.

• Ballistic Protection: The doors and the armoured glass in the windscreen provide a tunable level of ballistic protection, readily upgradable with add-on armour packs. To maximise payload and mobility, the base SF vehicle is only fitted with a light anti-mine plate, while additional protection can be installed if required.

• Crew safety and comfort: The crew is protected by a tubular frame roll-bar. Up to five crew can be carried, with the configuration of the seats being flexible. Typically a seat looking towards the rear is mounted, in order to provide observation and covering fire in the rear arc.

• Transportability: Currently the windscreen can be lowered, although the central roll-bar is fixed. A collapsible roll bar is under development which will allow the vehicle’s height to be minimized for air transport. In the reduced width configuration, the SF version of the LMV fits inside the CH-47 Chinook helicopter, and will be transportable in all tactical transport aircraft.

• Weapon system: Iveco has teamed up with a specialist weapon mount supplier to develop weapon supports and other mission specific features. The roll-bar is equipped with a weapon ring allowing the use of 7,62 mm or 12.7 mm machine gun and 40 mm automatic grenade launcher. A larger ring mount, equipped with a suitable platform for the gunner, is under development.

The SF LMV, which is already under evaluation by Special Forces from different countries, demonstrates Iveco DV’s capacity to understand and meet the customers’ requirements through a continuous programme of development and innovation.

The new LMV Special Forces will be displayed at IDET 2011, to be held in Brno from 10th to 13th May 2011.

buglerbilly
15-04-11, 02:13 PM
Textron Marine & Land Systems Awarded Contract Option for 88 M1117 and M1200 Armored Vehicles


M1117 Armored Security Vehicles (ASV).

13:41 GMT, April 14, 2011 NEW ORLEANS | Textron Marine & Land Systems, an operating unit of Textron Systems, a Textron Inc. company, today announced a firm-fixed-price contract award from the U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM) for 88 M1117 Armored Security Vehicles (ASV) and M1200 Armored Knight vehicles.

The award, valued at $64,332,732, exercises options for 37 M1117 ASVs, 51 M1200 Armored Knights and associated support equipment. The work will be performed through the end of 2012 at Textron Marine & Land Systems' facilities in the New Orleans area.

"The ASV is a versatile platform that continues to deliver exceptional mobility, reliability and survivability enabling the U.S. Army to carry out a wide range of combat mission roles," said Textron Marine & Land Systems Senior Vice President and General Manager Tom Walmsley. "For more than 12 years our team has worked hard to consistently deliver ASV products, in a variety of configurations, which provide our soldiers exceptional levels of security and protection."

The ASV is a 4X4 wheeled armored vehicle that offers significant crew protection through the employment of multiple layers of armor, defending against small arms fire, artillery projectile fragments, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) and land mines. It also uses a four-wheel independent suspension system to deliver superior mobility, agility, handling, and ride quality. The ASV has maintained exceptional operational readiness and combat availability rates over the life of the U.S. Army program.

Textron Marine & Land Systems also has achieved 66 consecutive months of on-time delivery to the U.S. Army on the ASV program, and has delivered a total of 2,777 ASVs and 314 Armored Knight vehicles to the U.S. Army to date.

The ASV family of vehicles performs a wide variety of missions including scout, infantry personnel carrier, reconnaissance, command and control and maintenance. U.S. Army ASV missions include operations with the Military Police, convoy protection, perimeter security, as well as Field Artillery Combat Observation and Lasing Teams (COLT) with the M1200 Armored Knight configuration.

buglerbilly
15-04-11, 02:19 PM
South American armed forces to trial Paramount armoured vehicles

Brazil is one of the countries, Colombia another, no idea who else.........the two that are are looking at Police and Paramilitary uses.............in the latter case related to the on-going Narco War................

19:21 GMT, April 14, 2011 An undisclosed number of “important countries” in South America will shortly begin in-country trials of two Paramount-produced armoured vehicles. A procurement decision is expected within months, the company says in a statement.

The Maverick, an internal security vehicle designed for use by police and other law enforcement organisations, and the Marauder, a mine protected armoured vehicle, will be trialled by both defence forces and internal security forces. “The successful outcome of these trials could lead to Paramount Group setting up manufacturing facilities in the region,” the company says in a statement.

“These trials are extremely significant for South Africa and South America as they mark greater collaboration between these two fast-growing economic regions,” Paramount Group CE John Craig says. “...these trials are all part of our aggressive expansion drive into the region. We expect the South American market for armoured vehicles to grow steadily over the next five years.

“As a result of force modernisation and a desire to address long standing internal security issues we are seeing growing defence expenditure across the region. Countries like Brazil, Colombia and Argentina have all announced double-digit increases in spending over the next five years,” Craig says.

“Paramount Group’s unique manufacturing approach, whereby we locate manufacturing facilities in-country, will allow us to share Africa’s best technology and skills with the engineers and scientists of South America. Technology transfer, better trade links and skills sharing are all positive outcomes of greater co-operation between South America and South Africa.”

Paramount’s entry into South America comes at an important and symbolic moment for South Africa, the media release adds. The world’s largest developing economies Brazil, China, Russia and India are holding their third annual meeting this week with South Africa being the “new entry” in this select group, now known as BRICS.

Paramount Group executive chairman Ivor Ichikowitz says “the world economy is being re-ordered and South America is emerging as a major powerhouse of growth and prosperity. However, it still faces some intractable internal security problems which are preventing it from exploiting its full potential. The reality is that sustainable economic growth requires sustainable security.

“Paramount Group’s presence in Brazil and our entry into Latin America comes at an historic time. Brazil and South Africa represent a new wave of emerging economies and both are important gateways to their continents. There is huge potential for collaboration in defence and aerospace and Paramount Group is proud to be at the forefront of this new age of collaboration,” Ichikowitz added.

“Paramount Group is one of the new breed of African businesses which are helping to diversify economies and stimulate regional economic integration. We believe Latin America offers a solid foundation for doing business in the future and we are keen to become an important industrial player and share our technology with new partners in the region.”

Paramount Group lays claim to the title of Africa’s largest privately owned defence and aerospace company with global manufacturing facilities and joint ventures with selected partners in Africa, Europe, Asia and elsewhere around the world. The company has experienced more than 20% sales growth year-on-year over the last five years and nearly doubled its workforce over the last 12 months. Founded in 1994, the company develops and designs solutions to tackle peacekeeping, defence and internal security problems. Solutions range from camp systems, logistic equipment, and personal protection gear, as well as crowd control equipment, communication technologies and armoured MPVs.

(Courtesy by defenceWeb; First published at http://goo.gl/hIC2m)

buglerbilly
21-04-11, 03:32 PM
New rugged UPS automatically shuts off during roll-overs

April 21, 2011



Most RUPS (Rugged Uninterruptible Power Supply) units and power conditioners remain "on" during vehicle and power equipment roll-overs due to shock, vibration, or kinetic impact during combat. UPS systems remaining on in those situations pose a safety risk to vehicle occupants, power generators, and sensitive electronic equipment. Addressing that risk, Acumentrics Corporation recently introduced the Rugged-UPS 2500 DC Series of uninterruptible power supply and/or power conditioner units that automatically sense the orientation of the vehicle or piece of equipment, and shut off. These units can also send a 12 VDC trigger signal to another system, for example, to relay an emergency alarm or activate another safety-related device. For added flexibility, Acumentrics can change the angle of activation from the default setting of ±90 degrees, and users may disable the function altogether.

"Our UPS and power conditioner systems are used in harsh physical and electrical environments," commented Jeff Boudreau, Senior Applications Engineer at Acumentrics. "We have tens of thousands of units working in military field operations. Typical applications where this shut-off feature is particularly helpful include Humvees, ships, trains, planes, tracked vehicles, and construction equipment where significant roll, inversions, or vibrations would present a dangerous situation to personnel or power sources." Boudreau also adds that the Rugged-UPS 2500 can be applied to such stationary power systems as gas, solar, and wind generators; batteries; and capacitors that need to be oriented correctly for optimum functionality. Acumentrics is the only company offering a UPS/power conditioner with an automatic shut-off capability and has a patent pending on the new feature.

The Rugged-UPS 2500 provides 2000W of nominal 28 VDC output or XX of AC output from an input range of 80 - 265 VAC / 47 - 400 Hz, or 22 - 32 VDC. This wide voltage range and frequency tolerance enables users to power up with field generators in any international standard and protects mission-critical equipment such as communications devices from surges, spikes, brownouts, blackouts, and noise.

Source: Acumentrics

buglerbilly
22-04-11, 02:44 AM
Force Protection wins $27.4m contract for delivery of 47 Mastiffs to UK

April 21, 2011

Force Protection Industries today announced it has received a $27.4 million sub-contract from Integrated Survivability Technologies Limited ("IST") for the delivery of 47 Cougar Mastiff vehicles to the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence. IST is a joint venture between Force Protection Europe Limited, a subsidiary of Force Protection Industries, Inc., and NP Aerospace Limited, a subsidiary of The Morgan Crucible Company plc. Work under this sub-contract will be performed in Ladson, South Carolina, and is scheduled to be completed by December 31, 2011.

Randy Hutcherson, Chief Operating Officer for Force Protection, commented, "The performance of the Cougar Mastiff continues to be outstanding. This additional order demonstrates that the Mastiff remains a proven life saver for British troops. The installed fleet of Cougar vehicle variants in the United Kingdom is growing and we remain pleased that the U.K. MoD continues to view Force Protection as an important partner in sustaining its military needs."

Source: Force Protection

buglerbilly
24-04-11, 04:15 AM
U.S. Army Issues 2nd Humvee RFI

By MICHAEL HOFFMAN

Published: 23 Apr 2011 11:53

The U.S. Army issued its second request for information for the competitive Humvee recapitalization program April 21, which is meant to upgrade 60,000 vehicles for no more than $180,000 a copy.

Army officials have said they want additional armor to put the Humvee's survivability on par with the mine-resistant, ambush-protected all-terrain vehicle but still keep it lighter than the M-ATV.

Congress denied the Army's request to shift money from buying new Humvees toward a recap program last year forcing the service to issue a second RFI after the Army published the first one in January 2010.

The Marine Corps could join the Army on the Humvee recap program by the time the Army is ready to issue a request for proposal, Col. David Bassett, the Army's project manager for tactical vehicles, said April 19.

Marine Corps officials had already sent out an RFI to recap their Humvee fleet. As the Pentagon looks for budget savings, Bassett said it might make sense to bring the programs together.

BAE Systems, Oshkosh and AM General, which makes the Humvee, have each developed kits that could compete for the Humvee recap contract. Each featured everything from double-V hull underbodies to advanced armor to structural blast channels, which vents a blast and provides structural stiffening.

The recap program is part of the Army's Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Strategy the service released in January. The Army plans to stop buying new Humvees by 2012 and reduce its overall fleet of 260,000 trucks by 15 percent by fiscal 2017.

buglerbilly
27-04-11, 01:55 PM
The Army’s fleet of luxury vehicles

By Philip Ewing Wednesday, April 27th, 2011 8:02 am



Here’s a novel observation from Sandra Erwin of National Defense magazine: These days, even the Army’s basic-transportation Humvees, MRAPs and other vehicles — hardly exemplars of passenger comfort, and delivered without chilled champagne refrigerators — can cost more than a Bentley. Not only that, the Army could pay $180,000 to upgrade a single Humvee for which it originally paid $50,000. Multiply that times 60,000 vehicles and you could be talking about some real money.

The brass is in a bind: Should it assume the Army’s vehicles of tomorrow will need to protect soldiers against the same kinds of improvised explosive devices that have taken such an awful toll in Iraq and Afghanistan? If so, that means bulkier, heavier vehicles with more protection — and bigger price tags.

Erwin summed it up:


Not able to predict what IEDs future enemies may use against U.S. forces, vehicle buyers face tough tradeoff decisions among weight, cost and protection, RAND analysts noted. And no matter what protection is acquired, there is no guarantee it will work. “Technology-based solutions to mitigate vulnerability are expensive, whereas the enemy’s countermeasures are relatively cheap,” the study said. Both the Army and Marine Corps have been weighing whether to fix or buy new as they map out their future truck fleets, but it appears increasingly likely that they will do more fixing than buying.

The truck that is being designed to replace the Humvee — the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle — is coming in at higher than expected costs. The original estimate for JLTV was approximately $250,000 per vehicle. The latest number from the Army is $300,000 per vehicle, and some outside estimates have exceeded $400,000, according to RAND. The large investment planned to refurbish the current Humvee fleet suggest that the military may be scaling back future JLTV purchases and expects to keep the Humvee going for a couple more decades.

As always, there’s a political element at work here, too. The Army watched carefully as the Marines fought to save their beloved Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle — and lost. One key reason for congressional skepticism on the EFV was that its design pre-dated the IED era, and it wasn’t equipped with updated protection against roadside bombs for when it finished swimming ashore and drove up on to the beach. This made the Marines exasperated. First they explained that they would never use the EFV anyplace where the bad guys had time to set up IEDs, then they said they would add a bolt-on armor kit that an EFV’s crew could use if they’d be spending a lot of time driving around as a normal armored personnel carrier. Pretty thin, skeptics concluded.

The lesson for the Army is that it daren’t try to field new or upgraded vehicles without IED and crew protections. That means part of the decision has already been made here, and even tomorrow’s “light” utility vehicles may be heavier than ever, and with price tags to match.

Read more: http://www.dodbuzz.com/2011/04/27/the-armys-fleet-of-luxury-vehicles/#ixzz1KjAv4prb
DoDBuzz.com

buglerbilly
28-04-11, 12:54 AM
Canadian Vehicle Buy Shifting, Taking Shape

Apr 27, 2011

By Paul McLeary



Details have begun to emerge on Canada’s ambitious C$5 billion ($5.26 billion) plan to buy thousands of new tactical wheeled vehicles — including reconnaissance vehicles, infantry carriers and logistics trucks — as the date approaches for contract awards.

Prequalified bidders for the largest segment of the buy — the 1,500-vehicle Standard Military Pattern (SMP) logistic truck fleet — include BAE Systems’ FMTV; Daimler AG’s Zetros; Oshkosh’s MTVR, FMTV and Hemtt-A4; Navistar Defense Canada’s ATX8; Renault Trucks’ Kerax 8x8; and Rheinmetall/MAN Military Vehicles Canada’s HX77 8x8. A contract award is scheduled for spring 2012, with deliveries to be completed by 2015.

Plans for the other vehicle types call for 108 Close Combat Vehicles (CCVs), 500 Tactical Armored Patrol Vehicle (TAPVs) and 13 Force Mobility Enhancement Vehicles. Open-source reporting puts the CCV budget at C$2.2 billion, but word has leaked that C$250 million has been moved out of that account and into the TAPV program.

The TAPV is being pegged as the replacement for two Canadian Forces vehicles: the MRAP RG-31 Armored Patrol Vehicle and the Coyote variant of the LAV personnel carrier. There also has been word that the TAPV buy will balloon from 500 vehicles to 750. The Canadian government refused to comment on these numbers when contacted by Aviation Week.

An award for the TAPV is due this fall, with prequalified bidders including Nexter; BAE Systems; Textron; Force Protection; and Oshkosh, which is submitting a variant of its MAT-V. BAE/Hägglunds AB is submitting its Aligator 6x6, and BAE Systems Land Systems OMC is offering its RG-31 Mk5 EM and RG35. Force Protection is in with its Cougar 4x4 and Cougar 6x6 MRAPs, and Thales Canada is offering the Bushmaster.

Photo credit: Netherlands Ministry of Defense

buglerbilly
29-04-11, 02:29 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

Facts/Rumors About Canada's Vehicle Program

Posted by Paul McLeary at 4/28/2011 1:33 PM CDT


Canadian convoy in Afghanistan

We’ve known the broad outlines of the Canadian $5 billion (Cdn) tactical wheeled vehicle reset and refit program for some time now, but some parts of the program are coming a bit more into focus now that we know who all of the pre-qualified bidders are. More on that here.

Although Canada’s Department of National Defense won’t confirm or deny it, there has been word that the Tactical Armored Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) buy—pegged as the replacement for the MRAP RG-31 and the Coyote personnel carrier—will balloon from 500 vehicles to 750 at some point soon. An award for the TAPV is due this fall, with prequalified bidders including Nexter; BAE Systems; Textron; Force Protection; and Oshkosh, which is submitting a variant of its MATV.

Likewise, media reports have put the CCV budget at about $2.2 billion, with rumblings that $250 million has been moved out of that account and into the TAPV program. One former Canadian Forces officer recently told me that the proposed TAPV buy, even if it stays at 500, is “a respectable number, which implies that they’re going to be using it for a lot of things. When you consider how small our Army is, 500 of anything is really quite an impressive number.”

When it comes to the CCV competition—the vehicle is the only one that is not replacing any current vehicle in the fleet—the DND says it is intended to “bridge the gap between light armored vehicles (5-20 metric tons) and heavy armored vehicles (more than 45 metric tons), coming in between 25 and 45 metric tons.” Companies approved by the DND are: Artec GmbH; BAE Systems Hägglunds AB; General Dynamics Land Systems – Canada; Nexter Systems; and Rheinmetall Landsysteme GmbH.

Given the global budget woes to which Canada is hardly immune, the retired Canadian officer I spoke with says that in the end when it comes to the CCV, “it’s possible the project may not see the light of day” depending on what happens in the upcoming Canadian elections on May 2, and the post-Afghanistan military budget crunches that will hit Canada as hard as anyone else.

buglerbilly
29-04-11, 02:56 AM
Northrop Grumman Joins BAE Systems’ JLTV Industry Team

on April 28, 2011 9:25 pm



Northrop Grumman has joined the BAE Systems lead Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) team. The BAE team currently consists of BAE Systems, Navistar Defense and Meritor Defense (formerly ArvinMeritor). As the new member of the team, Northrop Grumman will serve as the lead for electronics mission systems (C4ISR – command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) lead, responsible for the integration of command and control hardware and software, computers and communications equipment, sensors and sensor suites for intelligence gathering and force protection.

“Our decision to team with one of the world’s leaders in C4ISR recognizes the growing importance of situational awareness, information sharing, and command and control on the battlefield, both for vehicles and dismounted soldiers,” said Ann Hoholick, vice president and general manager of amphibious and new programs at BAE Systems explained the new move. Joe G. Taylor, Jr., Northrop Grumman Information Systems’ vice president for Ground Combat Systems added that the goal of the combined team effort is to deliver proven, low-risk solutions with the best vehicles, best payload, protection and performance that industry can offer. “Northrop Grumman will help us ensure that we provide the kind of scalable solutions the military needs, at an affordable price” Hoholick added. “By applying Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems’ substantial domain expertise, the team will develop a net-ready, open architecture system, allowing the warfighter to configure the JLTV platform rapidly and inexpensively for current and future mission needs.” The BAE Systems’ announcement said.

As one of three teams participating in the current Technology Development phase of the JLTV program the BAE team plans to compete for the next phase of the program, Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD). The BAE Lead team submitted the Valanx vehicle for the testing. The Army has announced plans to award up to two contracts for the EMD phase, which is currently scheduled for the beginning of 2012.


The Valanx, proposed by the BAE-Systems lead team for the U.S. Army/Marine Corps joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program. Photo: BAE Systems

Copyright © 2011 Defense Update. All Rights Reserved.

geof
30-04-11, 11:24 PM
Posted by Paul McLeary at 4/28/2011 1:33 PM CDT



We’ve known the broad outlines of the Canadian $5 billion (Cdn) tactical wheeled vehicle reset and refit program for some time now, but some parts of the program are coming a bit more into focus now that we know who all of the pre-qualified bidders are. More on that here.

Although Canada’s Department of National Defense won’t confirm or deny it, there has been word that the Tactical Armored Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) buy—pegged as the replacement for the MRAP RG-31 and the Coyote personnel carrier—will balloon from 500 vehicles to 750 at some point soon. An award for the TAPV is due this fall, with prequalified bidders including Nexter; BAE Systems; Textron; Force Protection; and Oshkosh, which is submitting a variant of its MATV.
.

..so in the space of a day Thales has been cut from this guys TAPV list .. ??

buglerbilly
01-05-11, 01:18 AM
Nah just possibly biased BUT he gets around criticism by say "..........prequalified bidders including........." either bias or more probably, more likely, just laziness.

geof
01-05-11, 01:51 AM
.. so Oshkosh have dropped the Bushmaster by the looks of things .. maybe too soon if the Canucks decide to go this way ..

buglerbilly
01-05-11, 02:18 AM
Considering Oshkosh is offering the M-ATV why would they offer Bushmaster?

geof
01-05-11, 02:59 AM
... more fingers in the pie I guess .. I just couldn't find the Bushmaster on there website so I figured they had dropped it ..

Mercator
01-05-11, 07:01 AM
Oshkosh have not been pushing bushmaster much at all lately to the point where I wonder if they are still in partnership with Thales. Note below that it was Thales Canada that was offering it for the Canadian competition. I hope that other article was just a mistake and the bushmaster is still in the running.

Canadian Vehicle Buy Shifting, Taking Shape

Apr 27, 2011

By Paul McLeary



Details have begun to emerge on Canada’s ambitious C$5 billion ($5.26 billion) plan to buy thousands of new tactical wheeled vehicles — including reconnaissance vehicles, infantry carriers and logistics trucks — as the date approaches for contract awards.

Prequalified bidders for the largest segment of the buy — the 1,500-vehicle Standard Military Pattern (SMP) logistic truck fleet — include BAE Systems’ FMTV; Daimler AG’s Zetros; Oshkosh’s MTVR, FMTV and Hemtt-A4; Navistar Defense Canada’s ATX8; Renault Trucks’ Kerax 8x8; and Rheinmetall/MAN Military Vehicles Canada’s HX77 8x8. A contract award is scheduled for spring 2012, with deliveries to be completed by 2015.

Plans for the other vehicle types call for 108 Close Combat Vehicles (CCVs), 500 Tactical Armored Patrol Vehicle (TAPVs) and 13 Force Mobility Enhancement Vehicles. Open-source reporting puts the CCV budget at C$2.2 billion, but word has leaked that C$250 million has been moved out of that account and into the TAPV program.

The TAPV is being pegged as the replacement for two Canadian Forces vehicles: the MRAP RG-31 Armored Patrol Vehicle and the Coyote variant of the LAV personnel carrier. There also has been word that the TAPV buy will balloon from 500 vehicles to 750. The Canadian government refused to comment on these numbers when contacted by Aviation Week.

An award for the TAPV is due this fall, with prequalified bidders including Nexter; BAE Systems; Textron; Force Protection; and Oshkosh, which is submitting a variant of its MAT-V. BAE/Hägglunds AB is submitting its Aligator 6x6, and BAE Systems Land Systems OMC is offering its RG-31 Mk5 EM and RG35. Force Protection is in with its Cougar 4x4 and Cougar 6x6 MRAPs, and Thales Canada is offering the Bushmaster.

Photo credit: Netherlands Ministry of Defense

buglerbilly
01-05-11, 10:25 AM
Oshkosh have not been pushing bushmaster much at all lately to the point where I wonder if they are still in partnership with Thales. Note below that it was Thales Canada that was offering it for the Canadian competition. I hope that other article was just a mistake and the bushmaster is still in the running.

WHY would Oshkosh be pushing Bushmaster anywhere any longer, they have M-ATV now and don't need Bushmaster in any shape or form...............Bushies are not even a tit-for-tat deal for any of the LAND programmes, neither OVERLANDER nor anything else..............

buglerbilly
05-05-11, 01:48 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

New Active Protection System Heading to Afghanistan?

Posted by Paul McLeary at 5/4/2011 11:40 AM CDT

According to budget documents submitted to Congress in February, an experimental vehicle-mounted active protection system that can defeat an incoming RPG before it hits the vehicle may be getting ready to deploy to Afghanistan.

As part of a packet of fiscal year ’12 budget documents DARPA provided to Congress, the agency reports that its vehicle-mounted Iron Curtain and Crosshairs programs are being melded into one system, and are being readied for “transition to combat forces in the 2010/2011 time frame.”

Crosshairs, developed by Mustang Technology Group, uses the Boomerang acoustic gunshot-detection sensor to cue the vehicle's remote-operated gun so the system can detect, locate and engage shooters.


DARPA announced last October that Crosshairs was deploying to Afghanistan, and in its fiscal year ’12 request to Congress it zeroed out funding for the program, as opposed to the previous year’s request for $3.9 million. But the ’12 doc also tells us that “the Crosshairs sensor system is being integrated with the Iron Curtain Active Protection System (IC-APS) on four up-armored vehicles,” after which “the Crosshairs systems will be ready for field testing.”

This is news. Marrying the Crosshairs system with the previously experimental—and undeployed—Iron Curtain active protection system would be a huge step in active protection capability for U.S. forces, allowing moving vehicles to detect, locate, and defeat both enemy snipers and incoming RPG rounds.


Uploaded by theworacle on Dec 1, 2009
Edited DARPA video showing 2008 tests of the Artis-developed Iron Curtain anti-RPG active protection system for light tactical vehicles - here an HMMWV. DARPA in November 2009 awarded Mustang Technologies a contract to integrate Iron Curtain with its Crosshairs counter-shooter system for tests on an MRAP. Cued by the corner-mounted Crosshairs' radar, an optical sensor classifies the incoming threat and selects the aimpoint. When the RPG is just inches from the vehicle, the roof-mounted countermeasure fires straight down, deflagrating the warhead before it can detonate.

Iron Curtain—a system which is mounted to the top of a vehicle that uses radar to detect an incoming round, identify it, and deploy a countermeasure from a downward-facing array—has been in testing for several years, but this is the first hint we’ve seen that it might actually be used in an operational setting.

Giving extra weight to DARPA’s statement that it wants to deploy the integrated system this year is the involvement of the Army’s Rapid Equipping Force and the MRAP Project Manager’s office in testing “to validate the capabilities and initiate transition to combat forces,” according to the request. In fiscal year ’10, according to the documents, DARPA “completed integration of the IC-APS and CrossCue system,” and “validated system performance and field-worthiness through testing by the Army Test and Evaluation Command.”

Contacted by Aviation Week, DAPRA refused to comment on the Crosshairs/Iron Curtain program, as has the Rapid Equipping Force. The Department of Defense handed questions off to DARPA.

A spokesperson form the Marine Corps Systems Command—which runs the MRAP office—while refusing to comment specifically, emails that “we are assessing the maturity of the technology to determine the potential to meet an urgent requirement from theater. As in any capability assessment it would include performance in an array of operational conditions that are representative of theater environments. While some of those relevant conditions have proven successful the system must fully demonstrate the required performance across the operational conditions.”

We’ll have to wait and see if RPGs start mysteriously exploding in midair for confirmation that this system has finally made it to theater.

buglerbilly
05-05-11, 12:55 PM
Pentagon Contract Announcement

(Source: U.S Department of Defense; issued May 4, 2011)

Navistar Defense, LLC, Warrenville, Ill., is being awarded $183,255,453 for firm-fixed-priced delivery order #0018 under previously awarded contract (M67854-07-D-5032) for the procurement 250 MaxxPro Dash ambulance vehicles.

The objective of the ambulance vehicles to provide mobile and survivable ambulatory care for injured servicemen in theater.

Work will be performed in West Point, Miss., and is expected to be completed by the end of September 2011. Contract funds in the amount of $183,255,453 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

-ends-

buglerbilly
07-05-11, 03:06 AM
MOD scientists' work on life-saving armour honoured

A History and Honour news article

6 May 11

Scientists from the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) in Wiltshire have been shortlisted for the MacRobert Award by the Royal Academy of Engineering for their work on a new life-saving armour system.


A Ridgback armoured vehicle on operations in Afghanistan
[Picture: Crown Copyright/MOD]

The nomination is for a ceramic protection system, which can be attached to vehicles to provide effective protection against hostile gunfire, developed and patented by Dstl and exploited by Coventry-based NP Aerospace as CAMAC® EFP.

The armour has been fielded in Afghanistan and has saved the lives of UK troops and members of the local population.

The development of CAMAC® EFP armour was made possible by collaboration - combining Dstl's specialist scientific expertise with NP Aerospace's expert engineering knowledge.

The system uses small thimble-sized hexagonal segments of ceramic held together by a moulding resin and packaged in a composite with high ballistic performance.

While ceramics provide very high levels of protection, their brittle nature means they are unable to resist multiple strikes.

Dstl's research explored the optimisation of the size and geometry of small segmented ceramic components and how to arrange them into an array to provide a panel with the best protection, resulting in this life-saving armour system.

Tom Stuart, one of the project's principal scientists, said:

"The Dstl team are very proud of this nomination. This armour technology represents a clear example of how MOD and UK industry have worked together to fast track this innovation from laboratory to the battlefield and save the lives of British Service personnel."


The new segmented ceramic armour
[Picture: Crown Copyright/MOD]

Dstl armour specialists continue to develop this technology with industrial partners on related projects, thus supporting critical research on new platforms within the UK, such as the recently procured Foxhound light protected patrol vehicle.

The MacRobert Award is the most prestigious award an engineer can aspire to and is presented annually to an organisation in recognition of innovation in engineering.

The armour appears on a four-organisation shortlist including computing giant Microsoft and British car manufacturer Jaguar. The eventual winner will receive their prize at a ceremony on 6 June 2011.

The Royal Academy of Engineering brings together the country's most eminent engineers from all disciplines to promote excellence in the science, art and practice of engineering.

Dr John Robinson, chairman of the judging panel, said:

"In the academy's 35th anniversary year we are delighted to see engineering projects developed in the UK having such a global impact, from connecting people more efficiently and protecting our troops, to making lighter, greener cars and leading the games industry. British engineering is alive and well - enriching society, making a profit, and helping to rebuild the economy."

Recent winners include Arup, responsible for Beijing's 'Water Cube', but a MOD organisation has not won the award since 1991, when the Defence Research Agency was honoured for the Nightbird night-vision system.

buglerbilly
10-05-11, 11:27 AM
Force Protection, CAE partner for Canadian TAPV

May 10, 2011

Force Protection Industries and CAE today announced the companies have entered into a teaming agreement to compete for the Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) project.

Force Protection Industries, Inc. previously announced that it has been selected by the Canadian Government as one of the competitor companies qualified to provide up to 600 wheeled combat vehicles and related long term support services. The Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) expects to award a contract to the final selected bidder by early 2012.

Randy Hutcherson, Chief Operating Officer of Force Protection, said, "We are pleased to partner with CAE, a global leader and one of Canada's most respected companies, to provide what we believe is the optimal solution for the TAPV project. Force Protection and CAE are committed to offering the Canadian Forces the safest and most reliable vehicle and to provide Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) that will contribute to the continuing viability of Canadian companies' capability and improve their competitiveness in both the domestic and international markets while continuing to strongly invest in the Canadian industry. We are looking forward to working with CAE as they have a wide range of capabilities and in-service support experience that will help us shape a winning technical, support, and industrial and regional benefit solution for the Canadian government."

Force Protection is offering the Canadian Forces variants of the Cougar wheeled combat vehicles to meet TAPV requirements. As the main Canadian partner, CAE would have overall responsibility for the comprehensive in-service support (ISS) solution, including: vehicle operator and mission training systems; engineering information environment; fleet management services; systems engineering support; and, lifecycle and integrated logistics support services. CAE would also be responsible for assembling a pan-Canadian team of companies to develop and support any country-specific requirements for Canada's replacement fleet of tactical armoured patrol vehicles.

"We look forward to partnering with Force Protection to develop a comprehensive in-service support solution for Canada's TAPV program," said Martin Gagne, CAE's Group President, Military Products, Training and Services. "We have a wealth of experience in comprehensive in-service support solutions, as we have demonstrated over many years for Canadian Forces air, land, and sea platforms. This partnership with Force Protection will produce a turnkey solution that is flexible, high-performing, cost-effective, and most importantly, supports our Canadian Forces in performing their missions safely."

Source: Force Protection

buglerbilly
10-05-11, 03:24 PM
Defence Forces Criticise Sisu Vehicle Quality

(Source: YLE Finnish Broadcasting Corp.; published May 9, 2011)

The Finnish Army’s equipment department would like to cease co-operation with truck manufacturer Sisu Auto. According to an equipment department memorandum, there have been complaints about the quality of the all-terrain vehicles provided by Sisu Defense Oy, the company’s defence arm.

Finnish carmaker Sisu Auto has been the Finnish Defence Forces’ most important all-terrain vehicle supplier since the 1930s. Now the relationship looks to be drifting into crisis.

According to the memo, the performance and quality of all-terrain vehicles has been seriously lacking for some time. According to the Equipment Department’s memo there are specific deficiencies in the vehicles’ safety, their ignition, their batteries and in visibility from the cabs.

Ministerial Counsellor Jouko Tuloisela says that the Defence Ministry is aware of the situation. “Sisu has been one of our main all-terrain vehicle suppliers,” said Tuloisela. “There has been a delay in vehicle deliveries recently, and there have been comments and complaints about the quality of the company’s work.”

According to Tuloisela the matter is ongoing with Sisu, and the Ministry would like to identify the specific problems.

In any case, the Equipment department’s memo harshly criticises Sisu Defence Oy. The department even recommends that the department does not order any more vehicles from Sisu Defence Oy.

The Defence Forces have ordered more than 50 million euros worth of different kinds of vehicles from Sisu in recent years. The company intends to deliver the final 300 or so vehicles by the end of this year.

The previously state-owned and now family-owned Sisu-group has in the last few years outsourced or sold off a lot of its operations. According to the Army’s memo, one possible cause of the delivery and performance issues could be the complicated company structure.

The Sisu group is composed of at least six different companies, one of which is Sisu Defense Oy. The state relinquished its control of Suomen Autoteollisuus, which became Sisu, in 1996.

-ends-

buglerbilly
11-05-11, 01:47 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

A Peek at BAE's TAP-V Submission

Posted by Paul McLeary at 5/10/2011 11:17 AM CDT



Wow! This is different..............I was expecting a regeneration of an existing vehicle..............

A little more news on the slow process the Canadian government is making in its long-planned overhaul of its tactical wheeled vehicle fleet: BAE Systems has released some details, and pictures, of its submission in the Tactical Armored Patrol Vehicle (TAP-V) part of the bid.

We’ve known for some time that the company was submitting a refitted RG-35 to the Canadians, but the company said today that it’s 4x4 RG35 RPU is about 5.2m long, 2.6m wide, and with a ground clearance of 414 millimeters, and has a gross vehicle mass of 21,000kg with a payload of 3,000kg and seats a driver plus 9 crew members. The TAP-V, which is being pegged as the replacement to Canada’s RG31 and Coyote reconnaissance, will be used by Canadian forces in a reconnaissance role on the battlefield, and domestically as a general utility vehicle. An award for the TAP-V contract of 500 vehicles is due this fall.


Pics: BAE Systems

buglerbilly
11-05-11, 03:13 AM
Heaps more photos, from BAE's Flickr photostream............



6x6 original next to the new 4x4...........obvious potential for a family of vehicles including 8x8's if required...............





Good side shot showing the side-mounted engine (behind the grill/box)................





Rear view..............no side doors, so the rear door and roof hatches are the only ways out.............not a big deal in my opinion for a vehicle this short...........



Heaps more pics can be seen here..................

http://www.flickr.com/photos/baesystemsinc/sets/72157626684409826/

Data sheet is here.............

http://www.baesystems.com/BAEProd/groups/public/@businesses/@landarmaments/documents/bae_publication/baes_pdf_ds_rg35_4x4.pdf

buglerbilly
12-05-11, 03:20 AM
DT Video: BAE Systems’ RG35 Armored Vehicle

You need to go to the link to see the video..............

Check out this DT exclusive video of BAE Systems South Africa’s RG35 Reconnaisance, Patrol and Utility Vehicle ripping it up. It’s being offered to the Canadian military for its Tactical Armoured Vehicle Program and features an armored crew citadel at its core that’s designed to protect the people inside from explosions and small arms fire. The truck can carry light and medium size turrets featuring everything from direct and indirect fire weapons to a host of ISR gear. Enjoy.

Read more: http://defensetech.org/#ixzz1M6IoGOhI
Defense.org

buglerbilly
12-05-11, 07:18 AM
Extra Aussie armoured vehicles for Defence

May 12, 2011 - 2:14PM .

AAP

The government is to buy an extra 101 Bushmaster armoured infantry transport vehicles to make up for losses in Afghanistan.

The Bushmaster is regarded by the defence force as a most effective combat vehicle, providing Australian troops with mobility and protection, especially against insurgent improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Defence Minister Stephen Smith said the vehicles unquestionably had saved lives.

Advertisement: Story continues below

The purchase follows the replacement of 31 Bushmasters that have been damaged beyond repair in recent years.

Another 70 vehicles will support current and future operations.

Bushmaster is a 15-tonne wheeled armoured vehicle constructed by defence company Thales at its plant in Bendigo, Victoria.

It can carry up to 10 soldiers, providing a high level of protection against small-arms and IED attack.

Some have experienced catastrophic damage in IED blasts, but no Australian soldier has ever been killed in a Bushmaster.

More than 700 Bushmasters are now in Australian Defence Force service and they have been deployed in East Timor, Iraq and Afghanistan. Others have been sold to the Netherlands military.

Mr Smith said defence would evaluate a range of enhancements to Bushmaster to increase the level of protection.

If these enhancements are viable they may be applied to the new 101 vehicles.

"The purchase of the Bushmasters is subject to the satisfactory negotiation of a contract with acceptable terms and conditions including in relation to performance, cost and schedule," Mr Smith said.

© 2011 AAP

Milne Bay
12-05-11, 09:24 AM
Extra Aussie armoured vehicles for Defence

May 12, 2011 - 2:14PM .

AAP

The government is to buy an extra 101 Bushmaster armoured infantry transport vehicles to make up for losses in Afghanistan.

The Bushmaster is regarded by the defence force as a most effective combat vehicle, providing Australian troops with mobility and protection, especially against insurgent improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Defence Minister Stephen Smith said the vehicles unquestionably had saved lives.

Advertisement: Story continues below

The purchase follows the replacement of 31 Bushmasters that have been damaged beyond repair in recent years.

Another 70 vehicles will support current and future operations.

Bushmaster is a 15-tonne wheeled armoured vehicle constructed by defence company Thales at its plant in Bendigo, Victoria.

It can carry up to 10 soldiers, providing a high level of protection against small-arms and IED attack.

Some have experienced catastrophic damage in IED blasts, but no Australian soldier has ever been killed in a Bushmaster.

More than 700 Bushmasters are now in Australian Defence Force service and they have been deployed in East Timor, Iraq and Afghanistan. Others have been sold to the Netherlands military.

Mr Smith said defence would evaluate a range of enhancements to Bushmaster to increase the level of protection.

If these enhancements are viable they may be applied to the new 101 vehicles.

"The purchase of the Bushmasters is subject to the satisfactory negotiation of a contract with acceptable terms and conditions including in relation to performance, cost and schedule," Mr Smith said.

© 2011 AAP

31 damaged beyond repair.
I wonder how many were damaged but repairable.
Great to see that they do what they were designed to do - protect diggers' lives.
It would be instructional to know how many were repairable. Would give an indication of how many incidents there were where the bushmaster saved lives.

buglerbilly
12-05-11, 09:40 AM
Guessing possibly as many as double that number again, but there's damage and then there's damage, so even in some repairable cases the vehicles will have been pretty severely damaged. Pretty good as that is what they are designed for, take a blast and keep the troops safe..............

Milne Bay
12-05-11, 10:13 AM
Guessing possibly as many as double that number again, but there's damage and then there's damage, so even in some repairable cases the vehicles will have been pretty severely damaged. Pretty good as that is what they are designed for, take a blast and keep the troops safe..............

Indeed.
I wonder what the proposed enhancements involve.

buglerbilly
14-05-11, 03:11 AM
Azerbaijan MDI Expands Joint Production of Advanced Armoured Vehicles



The Azerbaijan Ministry of Defence Industries (MDI) has extended the Joint Production Agreement with Paramount Group, Africa's largest privately owned defence company, to produce 60 new mine protected vehicles in Baku.

This expansion of the current production facility was announced at IDEF, Turkey's international defence exhibition, and will comprise 30 Marauder and 30 Matador IED and mine-protected vehicles, with deliveries running through to late 2012.

The announcement follows Paramount Group's recent successful establishment of a joint production facility and the production of an initial 30 vehicles (15 Matadors and 15 Marauders) to the Azerbaijan MDI, under a joint production agreement set up in 2009.

Commenting on the new order, the Honourable Minister of Defence Industry of Azerbaijan, Mr Yaver Jamalov, said: "Both Matador and Marauder are highly flexible and advanced IED-protected vehicles that ideally meet the requirements of our armed forces. We chose Paramount Group's vehicles because they are the most technologically advanced on the market and are flexible enough to deal with a variety of situations.

"Since 2009 we have had a robust partnership with Paramount Group based around our firm belief in the creation of a strong local defence industry and we look forward to continuing to benefit from this partnership by further developing Azerbaijan's engineering skills and vehicle production capacity. Partnerships like this show the world that the future of Europe's defence industry is no longer in the hands of a few West European manufacturers."

Commenting on the new order, Ivor Ichikowitz, Executive Chairman of Paramount Group, said: "This agreement is great news for both Paramount Group and Azerbaijan. It shows that our original project to produce 30 vehicles in Azerbaijan has been an outstanding success for all involved and is a testament to the foresight of President Ilham Aliyev in seeking to establish a production base for the future success of the country.

"Paramount Group is a world leader in the development of mine-protected vehicle technology. We apply a 'blank sheet' approach to design which means we develop the most modern technology for our vehicles. Our success in Azerbaijan gives Paramount a firm foothold in Eastern Europe from which to explore future joint production partnerships.

"A key benefit of our continued partnership is that Paramount Group is able to establish joint production facilities with the Ministry of Defence Industry of Azerbaijan, which helps the wider development of high-technology industries and the skilled workforce they require. This 'in-country' approach is key to Paramount Group's philosophy of sharing the economic and technical benefits of hi-tech production with countries where our vehicles are produced."

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news/35421/Azerbaijan_MDI_Expands_Joint_Production_of_Advance d_Armoured_Vehicles.htm#ixzz1MHxaaj61

Exsandgroper
15-05-11, 11:46 PM
Defence firms vie for $1bn deal
Brendan Nicholson From: The Australian May 16, 2011 12:00AM

MAJOR problems in a massive US program to build a blast-proof armoured vehicle to protect its soldiers from bombs have brought three Australian companies back into the race to build a troop carrier for our special forces.
In 2008, Australia contributed $40 million to the American program to develop a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle for the US Army and marines.

The intention was to give Australian special forces, in particular, access to top US technology to help protect them against the improvised bombs that are the biggest killers of coalition troops and civilians in Afghanistan.

The vehicles have to be light enough to be carried into battle under a helicopter but heavy enough for those inside to survive a massive explosion.

The Australian government is scheduled to put up to $100m more into the next stage of the US project.

But the US has tested nine prototype vehicles developed by three American companies and found none of them fulfilled the purpose.

Those vehicles have been sent to Australia and are undergoing testing in Victoria.

In the meantime, three Australian companies have produced armoured vehicles they believe would meet the requirements.

None can speak about the project because of secrecy provisions in their contracts with Australia's Department of Defence.

Designing the vehicle is proving extremely difficult.

A vehicle light enough to be slung under a helicopter is likely too light to slow the acceleration that can prove lethal to its crew if it detonates a massive bomb.

As an insurance policy of sorts, and in response to demands from politicians and industry to give local companies a chance at the contract, worth well over $1 billion, the government launched a separate development program in Australia.

Three companies -- Thales Australia, with its Hawkei military vehicle; Force Protection, with its Ocelot; and General Dynamics, with its Eagle IV -- have produced prototypes which are being tested by Defence.

A Defence spokesman told The Australian a decision would be made later this year when testing had been completed.

It is understood the government is considering whether to invest further in the US program, put its money into the next stage of the local program or stick with both programs until a superior vehicle is developed.

IMHO we should not invest any more into the US program until they sort out their problems, if they can.

Cheers

Weasel
16-05-11, 01:56 AM
Defence firms vie for $1bn deal
Brendan Nicholson From: The Australian May 16, 2011 12:00AM

MAJOR problems in a massive US program to build a blast-proof armoured vehicle to protect its soldiers from bombs have brought three Australian companies back into the race to build a troop carrier for our special forces.
In 2008, Australia contributed $40 million to the American program to develop a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle for the US Army and marines.

The intention was to give Australian special forces, in particular, access to top US technology to help protect them against the improvised bombs that are the biggest killers of coalition troops and civilians in Afghanistan.

The vehicles have to be light enough to be carried into battle under a helicopter but heavy enough for those inside to survive a massive explosion.

The Australian government is scheduled to put up to $100m more into the next stage of the US project.

But the US has tested nine prototype vehicles developed by three American companies and found none of them fulfilled the purpose.

Those vehicles have been sent to Australia and are undergoing testing in Victoria.

In the meantime, three Australian companies have produced armoured vehicles they believe would meet the requirements.

None can speak about the project because of secrecy provisions in their contracts with Australia's Department of Defence.

Designing the vehicle is proving extremely difficult.

A vehicle light enough to be slung under a helicopter is likely too light to slow the acceleration that can prove lethal to its crew if it detonates a massive bomb.

As an insurance policy of sorts, and in response to demands from politicians and industry to give local companies a chance at the contract, worth well over $1 billion, the government launched a separate development program in Australia.

Three companies -- Thales Australia, with its Hawkei military vehicle; Force Protection, with its Ocelot; and General Dynamics, with its Eagle IV -- have produced prototypes which are being tested by Defence.

A Defence spokesman told The Australian a decision would be made later this year when testing had been completed.

It is understood the government is considering whether to invest further in the US program, put its money into the next stage of the local program or stick with both programs until a superior vehicle is developed.

IMHO we should not invest any more into the US program until they sort out their problems, if they can.

Cheers

Has anyone heard the saying" It's not about the cargo, it's about the crane" or in this case the helicopter.

cheers

w

geof
16-05-11, 07:24 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

A Peek at BAE's TAP-V Submission

Posted by Paul McLeary at 5/10/2011 11:17 AM CDT



Wow! This is different..............I was expecting a regeneration of an existing vehicle..............

A little more news on the slow process the Canadian government is making in its long-planned overhaul of its tactical wheeled vehicle fleet: BAE Systems has released some details, and pictures, of its submission in the Tactical Armored Patrol Vehicle (TAP-V) part of the bid.

We’ve known for some time that the company was submitting a refitted RG-35 to the Canadians, but the company said today that it’s 4x4 RG35 RPU is about 5.2m long, 2.6m wide, and with a ground clearance of 414 millimeters, and has a gross vehicle mass of 21,000kg with a payload of 3,000kg and seats a driver plus 9 crew members. The TAP-V, which is being pegged as the replacement to Canada’s RG31 and Coyote reconnaissance, will be used by Canadian forces in a reconnaissance role on the battlefield, and domestically as a general utility vehicle. An award for the TAP-V contract of 500 vehicles is due this fall.


Pics: BAE Systems


.. YIKES .. What a Beastie ... 21t thats got to be too heavy ... too much for a C130 even ( I think ) ?? or border line to say the least .. far too chunky for urban opps ..

buglerbilly
16-05-11, 11:08 AM
.. YIKES .. What a Beastie ... 21t thats got to be too heavy ... too much for a C130 even ( I think ) ?? or border line to say the least .. far too chunky for urban opps ..

Nothing worth a damn goes in a Herc................why too chunky for Urban Ops? The design looks to be more mobile in Urban Ops than most/many.........the Wheels forward layout should help.

buglerbilly
17-05-11, 02:34 PM
CSI, RSD launch new line of tactical combat vehicles

May 17, 2011



Critical Solutions International (CSI) of Dallas, TX, in partnership with RSD, a division of DCD-DORBYL (Pty) Ltd. of Boksburg, South Africa, launched the Mountain Lion family of high mobility armored vehicles at the NDIA Special Operations Forces Industry Conference (SOFIC). On exhibit is the first prototype, an 8-seat medium-weight class vehicle.

"All Mountain Lion variants will combine and improve upon generations of combat-proven designs from our VMMD Husky currently deployed with US forces in Afghanistan and Iraq," said CSI President, Shon Craig. "The end result is a mobile, protective and versatile next-generation line of vehicles capable of operating in mountainous and rough terrain."



The Mountain Lion family of vehicles span the weight, protection and performance range from JLTV to MRAP, creating:

Increased Mobility:
-- Permanent 4 wheel steering that creates a turning circle of 40ft.
-- Fully independent suspension with a 16" ground clearance.

Enhanced and Extended Protection:
-- One piece (monocoque) V-shaped armored hull for crew and critical sub-systems.
-- A and B-kit armor tailored to customer requirements.

Performance and Versatility:
-- Multiple seating configurations for up to 12 occupants.
-- Increased payload for a wide range of command and control functions as well as route clearance and combat support roles.
-- Maximum use of commercial components to enhance maintainability and supportability.
-- Designed to enable the option of a diesel-electric hybrid drive train.

CSI, in partnership with RSD, has been a consistent resource to the US Army and Marine Corps, for the successful acquisition, testing, development and production of numerous mine-detection and counter-IED vehicles and systems currently deployed in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Source: CSI



Specifications:

http://www.c-s-i.com/Products/images/ML-specs.pdf

Product Brochure:

http://www.c-s-i.com/Products/images/ML.pdf

buglerbilly
17-05-11, 05:03 PM
I don't really understand WHY another such vehicle has been brought to the market? :cuckoo

Seems a waste of time, money and effort to me and stands little chance of gaining orders from anyone other than Third World nations, and then only with the correct bung................

Even if the four-wheel steering is nice, its not the only one.

Gubler, A.
18-05-11, 01:36 AM
.. YIKES .. What a Beastie ... 21t thats got to be too heavy ... too much for a C130 even ( I think ) ?? or border line to say the least .. far too chunky for urban opps ..

Its physical dimensions, width (2.6m) and length (5.1m), are very good for urban combat, much better than a tank or APC. How they got it to 21 tonnes indicates a LOT of armour. It is 2/3s the length of the RG-35 6x6 with similar width, height and ground clearance. Yet a few tonnes heavier. Compared to the standard 1cm HHS armour Bushmaster it is 2/3s the length with similar width, height and ground clearance yet 1.4 times the weight. So adjusted for length it is TWICE the weight of a Bushmaster. While its 550 hp Cummins engine is a bit heavier than the Bushmaster's 300 hp Cummins the weight difference has to be in armour. Lots of armour.

buglerbilly
18-05-11, 02:04 AM
Its physical dimensions, width (2.6m) and length (5.1m), are very good for urban combat, much better than a tank or APC. How they got it to 21 tonnes indicates a LOT of armour. It is 2/3s the length of the RG-35 6x6 with similar width, height and ground clearance. Yet a few tonnes heavier. Compared to the standard 1cm HHS armour Bushmaster it is 2/3s the length with similar width, height and ground clearance yet 1.4 times the weight. So adjusted for length it is TWICE the weight of a Bushmaster. While its 550 hp Cummins engine is a bit heavier than the Bushmaster's 300 hp Cummins the weight difference has to be in armour. Lots of armour.

The Tare weight of that vehicle is 12+ tonnes so there is approx 5-6 tonnes of armour NOT including other gear and the RWS............

buglerbilly
18-05-11, 02:15 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

Getting Together on the Humvee

Posted by Paul McLeary at 5/17/2011 10:34 AM CDT



While we all await the official—and for now, separate—Requests for Proposal from the Army and the Marine Corps for the long-awaited Humvee recap program that would rebuild at least 60,000 Army HMMWV’s and 3,400 Marine HMMWV’s, no one is quite sure yet what the exact requirements will be, or if the two services will come together to offer a joint request.
While a joint program would certainly entail some concessions from both services as to weight, survivability, and mobility, it would also most certainly be more cost effective in terms of economies of scale for both services—something that is becoming a high priority at the Pentagon.

At a recent breakfast meeting with reporters, Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Peter Chiarelli spoke to the issue. Due to President Obama’s request for $400 billion in defense budget cuts over the long term, “the services are working together to look at programs, redundancies and duplications” wherever they can, he said. While redundancies across the services in and of themselves aren’t always a bad thing, the Pentagon needs to “take a look across the services to see if we have duplications, and if we can play to the strength of one service.” In fact, the services have already come together in a series of what one industry official calls “technology summits” to try and hammer out common requirements. But with the Marine RFP due any day now, and the Army’s due next month, no one is quite sure what to expect.

One thing everyone does agree on however, is that the bruised and battered Humvee fleet needs help, and since the services plan on driving them by the thousands at least until 2030, the fleet needs help fast. A RAND study released earlier this year found that given the HMMWV’s quarter century of service, multiple variants, and years at war have thrown the fleet “out of balance in several areas.” The Army National Guard actually has a higher percentage of uparmored HMMWVs than the active force “despite having fewer requirements, but the [Guard’s] overall level of modernization trails both the active component and U.S. Army Reserve because of its lower level of modernized unarmored HMMWVs.” It’s an imbalance that will take lots of money, and decades, to undo.

Gubler, A.
18-05-11, 07:14 AM
The Tare weight of that vehicle is 12+ tonnes so there is approx 5-6 tonnes of armour NOT including other gear and the RWS............

Also not including the armour of its monocoque hull.

buglerbilly
18-05-11, 02:38 PM
Via Soldier Systems................

Hyena from Armor Works

May 18th, 2011

Armor Works unveiled to new Hyena combat vehicle yesterday at the Special Operations Forces Industry Conference in Tampa, Florida. Designed using internal R&D (IRAD) funds, the Hyena isn’t built for any particular program but rather to a more generic set of requirements gleaned from interaction with the SOF community. We spoke with lead designer Kent Saucedo about the Hyena.



The vehicle finds its origins in the Fast Attack Vehicle class that was popular in the 80s and 90s which had its roots in the off-road racing community. At some point, conventional wisdom shifted to more traditional vehicle designs and with that came a lot of wasted space. Armor Works wanted to offer a vehicle with a 1:1 footprint offering every bit of the Hyena’s dimension as usable space. Additionally, the suspension is low in the vehicle in order to maintain a low Center of Gravity. Currently, the Hyena is powered by a turbo diesel but Armor Works is investigating alternative power packs for version 2.

As you can see from the photo the Hyena offers a combination of mobility, lethality, survivability and information dominance. What’s more, all of these systems work and aren’t some pie-in-the-sky concepts that will be developed only if funded.



The Hyena accommodates five personnel which include a driver, three crew in the middle compartment, seated three abreast as well as a rear facing crew position. There is also fittings to carry two litters. The entire crew is protected by a interconnected series of roll bars. All four passengers have access to weapons as well as access to the Hyena’s C4ISR system which includes a thermal camera. The Hyena is technology agnostic and a variety of collection and self-protection systems can be integrated into the frame. The center driver station is a drive-over-wheel design that offers the most visibility. Additionally, the dash rotates forward to accommodate ingress and egress.



It is a slow rock crawler designed to maneuver through rough washes and other debris strewn areas but can also accomplish sprints in excess of 80 mph in order to get you out of harm’s way in a hurry. Not shown is a trailer which will offer the Hyena a 1500 mile range due to its onboard stores of 50 gal of fuel, 50 gal of water, batteries and other storage.

The ver 2 offers a couple of upgrades that we are looking forward to seeing. For example, the middle crew seat will be pneumatic so that in the weapon station, the crewman remains strapped into his seat. Roll overs and other hazards have been considered in the design and the seat will collapse back into the vehicle. Additionally, a new composite monolithic hull tub is almost ready for production that is molded in a single piece in one of Armor Works’ giant autoclaves.

Of special note is the TactiCam random pattern3d camouflage applique. You may have seen photos of this on a Stryker at last year’s AUSA. It consists of randomly generated 3D geometric shapes and is designed to disrupt the vehicle’s planar surfaces with its combination of highlight and shadow areas. It has proven effective against daylight visual detection as well as ground radar, laser designators, thermal IR as well as EMI and RFI.

A V22 compatible version is in the works but will sacrifice one of the middle crew seats due to the narrow cabin space of the Osprey.

buglerbilly
25-05-11, 01:33 AM
Force Protection Expands Industry Team Targeting Canada’s TAPV Program

By tamir_eshel on May 24, 2011 10:14 pm


The Cougar is currently operated by the U.S. marine Corps, as well as teh British Army. Both servcies are using several variants of the 4x4 and 6x6 vehicles. Photo: MOD

Force Protection Industries is strengthening the international industry team it is leading in bidding for the Canadian TAPV program. The company announced today the addition of Lockheed Martin Canada as the provider of integrated C4ISR systems for the program, and Elbit Systems, to provide the Dual Remote Weapon Station (DRWS). CAE was announced recently as Force Protection’s main Canadian partner with responsibility for providing the in-service support solution. Force Protection is offering the Canadian military variants of the Cougar wheeled armored vehicles to meet TAPV requirements. The Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) expects to award a contract to the final selected bidder by early 2012.

Force Protection Industries is one of several competitors shortlisted to compete for the supply of up to 600 wheeled combat vehicles expected to replace patrol and recce vehicles currently serving the Canadian land forces. Both Elbit Systems and Lockheed Martin Canada will rely on local manufacturing, further contributing to the team’s economic proposition. The DRWS, developed by Elbit Systems Land and C4I, will be produced in Nova Scotia Canada, creating high-tech, high-value jobs in that region. Elbit has already competed in the previous round of the TAPV program, as a member of an international team led by L3.


Elbit Systems' Dual Remote Weapon Station (DRWS). Photo: Elbit Systems.

buglerbilly
25-05-11, 02:07 PM
Oshkosh Defense to Begin Full-Rate Production of New Vehicles for U.S. Marine Corps

(Source: Oshkosh Defense; issued May 24, 2011)


LVSR Tractor

OSHKOSH, Wis. --- Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, will deliver more than 200 Logistics Vehicle System Replacement (LVSR) tractors and nearly 70 LVSR wreckers following an order from the U.S. Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM). These will be the first full-rate production tractor and wrecker variants, complementing the LVSR cargo variants that have been supporting Marines in Afghanistan since September 2009.

“The LVSR tractors and wreckers allow Marines to navigate some of their heaviest equipment through the most challenging off-road terrain,” said John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “In addition to optimizing mobility, the LVSR incorporates technology that provides sophisticated on-board diagnostics information and integrated armor for superior protection. Oshkosh is pleased to support Marine Corps missions with these innovative and highly protected tractors and wreckers.”

The LVSR tractor is designed to haul combat vehicles, semi-trailers and other equipment. It has a fifth-wheel vertical-loading capacity of 25.3 tons and a recovery winch with a 30-ton capacity. The LVSR wrecker supports vehicle recovery in a wide range of terrain – from deserts to mountains – including sand, mud, water and snow. The heavy-payload vehicle can flat tow vehicles weighing as much as 55 tons as well as lift and tow vehicles weighing as much as 48 tons.

The advanced LVSR is produced in three variants – cargo, wrecker and tractor – and features an on-road payload capacity of 22.5 tons and an off-road payload capacity of 16.5 tons. It is equipped with the Oshkosh Command Zone™ embedded diagnostics system to provide real-time performance feedback on vital vehicle information and uses the company’s patented TAK-4® independent suspension system for off-road mobility in the most challenging environments.

LVSR tractor and wrecker production is scheduled to begin in January 2012 and be completed in September 2012. The order is valued at nearly $125 million.


LVSR Wrecker

Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, is an industry-leading global designer and manufacturer of tactical military trucks and armored wheeled vehicles, delivering a full product line of conventional and hybrid vehicles, advanced armor options, proprietary suspensions and vehicles with payloads that can exceed 70 tons. Oshkosh Defense provides a global service and supply network including full life-cycle support and remanufacturing, and its vehicles are recognized the world over for superior performance, reliability and protection.

-ends-

buglerbilly
27-05-11, 01:08 PM
German Armed Forces Procure Protected Mercedes-Benz Actros Heavy Recovery Vehicle

(Source: Mercedes Benz Special Trucks; issued May 26, 2011)


The German army is procuring Mercedes Benz Actros Heavy Recovery Vehicles for immediate use in Afghanistan, where they are already operated by Canada. (MB photo)

STUTTGART / BONN --- Mercedes-Benz Special Trucks in Germany has signed a contract with the German Armed Forces for delivery of protected Actros Heavy Recovery Vehicles for immediate use by the German troops in Afghanistan. The supply of these vehicles will substantially enlarge the capabilities of the ‘Bundeswehr’ and continue the successful relationship with Mercedes-Benz. Only in the last three years over 2.000 trucks and 650 Unimogs have been supplied by Mercedes-Benz.

The Actros vehicles to be delivered will be of the same configuration and with the same high level of protection as those successfully operated by the Canadian Armed Forces in Afghanistan since March 2008. The vehicles will ensure the best available protection in wheeled logistics vehicles for the German soldiers in operation.

With a lead time of seven months between contract award and delivery, Mercedes-Benz Special Trucks will once more demonstrate its ability to react quickly to customer needs while ensuring at the same time the high level of quality, performance as well as protection uncompromised to ist principle trucks you can trust.

Protection of the highest level

With the heavily-armoured Actros 4151 AK 8x8, Mercedes-Benz is setting new standards in special-purpose logistics vehicles. The Actros provides Level 4 ballistic protection and Level 4b mine protection according to STANAG 4569. Thanks to its extremely effective armour against blasts and shrapnel, the Actros is also setting standards when it comes to protection against IED's and car bombs.

Ultimate protection and recovery capability

The systems of the heavily-armoured Actros 4151 AK 8x8 have been further optimized on the basis of many years of experience. Having proven its worth with the deployment of around 100 vehicles in six different vehicle variants in crisis regions around the world, the armoured Mercedes-Benz Actros has set bench*marks. Thanks to their excellent cab protection, high-performance chassis and tried-and-tested bodies, the vehicles are able to offer a deployment availability of over 95%.

Mercedes-Benz has now consistently extended the vehicle's potential even further. In doing so, the body has basically been retained while the protection of the cab against weapons fire, shrapnel and blasts from explosive devices has been further enhanced. The drivetrain has now been designed to comply with the Euro 5 emissions standard applicable in Europe. Furthermore, the high-performance recovery and crane body has benefited from an improved and particularly user-friendly common control system.

Improved protection and ergonomics

As a result, the structure of the cab has been optimised, and the cab itself has been fitted with improved protection and new reinforced glass. The armoured cab can be tilted forward so as to guarantee access to the engine compartment, which is also armoured. A new seating system with 5-point seat belts provides the optimum basis for protecting the occupants against attack, including from the side. At the same time the seats offer both secure support when driving off-road as well as good freedom of movement. A high-performance air conditioning system helps to ensure optimum temperatures are maintained, even in extreme climatic conditions.

Technical Details of the Heavy Recovery Vehicle

A particular challenge faced by heavy recovery vehicles is the distribution of axle loads in all deployment situations - from heavy-duty recovery applications through to driving when empty. While the weight of the armoured cab lies across the front axles only, in recovery situations the weight of the raised, towed vehicle places a load on the rear axles which can act like a huge lever. The Actros 4151 AK 8x8 Recovery vehicle, however, has been designed in such a way as to ensure a substantially uniform axle load distribution and also enable safe handling in both heavy-duty recovery situations and also when driving unladen.

The protected Special Vehicle has a weight of 33.500 kg, a length of 10.530 mm, a width of 2.800 mm and a height of 3.400 mm. The wheelbase of the Mercedes-Benz Actros 8x8 is 5.580 mm. The BlueTec 5-V8-engine of the type OM 502 LA has a power of 375 kW/ 510 hp.

The recovery technology consists of the wreckerbody made bei Empl, three Rotzler-winches and a Hiab-front-crane. The Rotzler-winches have a max. tractive power of 25 to with a cable-length of 100 m. The Hiab-crane has a lifting capacity of 7.500 kg with 2,60 m. The arm of the Empl-wrecker has a lifting height of 5 m and a lifting capacity of 16 to. The wrecker capacity while driving is more than 12 to.

Available in a wide range of variants

In addition to the recovery vehicles on display which feature ultimate cab protection, a variety other chassis and body variants are also available - ranging from the heavy semitrailer tractor or hook lift with container handling unit, to the pickup body with crane. A wide variety of engines is also available. Based on a modular assembly system, Mercedes-Benz also offers cabs with lower classes of protection and in different lengths for the Actros 8x8, in some cases also with ABC protection.

-ends-

buglerbilly
27-05-11, 05:05 PM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

Humvee Questions Due Today

Posted by Paul McLeary at 5/27/2011 10:06 AM CDT



Today is the deadline for industry to submit their questions to the Army for its HMMWV (Humvee) Recapitalization program. The official Request for Proposals obviously isn’t out yet for either the Army or the Marine recap programs, and we’re going to have to wait a while longer to see if the services get together and offer a single program for truck makers to bid on, or if they do it separately.

As of right now, the Army says that it wants to rebuild at least 60,000 Humvees from the frame on up, while the Marines are reportedly looking for about 3,400. The Army’s proposal for the 60,000 (with long term projections coming closer to 100,000 vehicles) comes at a time when it plans on adding GCVs and JLTVs to the fleet, while culling of a full 15 percent of its 260,000 truck fleet by fiscal year 2017.

In FY12 budget documents, the Army proposes recapping a little under 3,000 up-armored Humvees a year starting in fiscal 2013 until it upgrades over 68,000 vehicles, which will run about $161 million a year from 2012 through 2016.

But looking at what the services have said they expect from the program, it’s clear that the protection and mobility goals push the envelope of the possible in vehicle design— demanding near MRAP levels of protection, while giving the vehicle back its original mobility and decreasing the weight of the current uparmored variant. Still, Oshkosh; Textron/Grantie; AM General; and BAE Systems have all committed to giving it a shot.

The Army plans on driving the recapped Humvees well past 2030, and has set its recap price limit at $180,000 per vehicle—which is significantly less than the estimated $300,000 per vehicle for the JLTV, (which could balloon to over $400,000 according to a recent RAND study) which is supposed to replace about 50,000 Humvees in the future fleet.

Lots of questions. And the Army is going to have to start answering them.

buglerbilly
01-06-11, 12:53 PM
Force Protection to Debut Team Timberwolf at CANSEC Exhibition

(Source: Force Protection, Inc.; issued May 31, 2011)

LADSON, S.C. --- Force Protection Industries, Inc. announced today the formation of Team Timberwolf on the eve of CANSEC, Canada's foremost defence and security technology showcase. Team Timberwolf is comprised of Force Protection Survivability Solutions Canada, CAE, Elbit Systems and Lockheed Martin Canada to compete for the Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) project.

Team Timberwolf will offer a complete vehicle system and comprehensive in-service support solution. The vehicle is based on the battle proven Cougar vehicle with independent suspension, integrated C4ISR and dual remote weapons systems. Team Timberwolf will debut at CANSEC 2011 to be held June 1-2 at the Lansdowne Park in Ottawa. Visitors can see video of Timberwolf in action at CAE's booth (#3201) during the CANSEC exhibition, and also visit the Team Timberwolf outdoor display (#315).

Randy Hutcherson, Chief Operating Officer of Force Protection, said, "Team Timberwolf was formed to give Canadian Forces the best and most complete system offering available on the market today in terms of survivability, situational awareness, fighting capability and reparability. We are pleased that CAE, Elbit Systems and Lockheed Martin Canada are part of the team offering Canada the best solution for the TAPV project. The Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) developed through the growing Canadian team will be a direct benefit to Canadian companies in the regions responsible for delivering components for Team Timberwolf."

Force Protection Industries, Inc. previously announced that it has been selected by the Canadian Government as one of the competitor companies qualified to provide up to 600 wheeled combat vehicles and related long term support services. The Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) expects to award a contract to the final selected bidder by early 2012. Force Protection also previously announced that it has entered into teaming agreements with CAE, Elbit Systems and Lockheed Martin Canada for the TAPV project.

Force Protection, Inc. is a leading designer, developer and manufacturer of survivability solutions, including blast- and ballistic-protected wheeled vehicles currently deployed by the U.S. military and its allies to support armed forces and security personnel in conflict zones. The Company's specialty vehicles, including the Buffalo, Cougar, Ocelot and related variants, are designed specifically for reconnaissance and urban operations and to protect their occupants from landmines, hostile fire, and improvised explosive devices (commonly referred to as roadside bombs). Complementing these efforts, the Company is designing, developing and marketing the JAMMA, a new vehicle platform that provides increased modularity, transportability, speed and mobility.

-ends-

Oshkosh Defense Showcases Mission-Proven Vehicle Platforms at CANSEC 2011

(Source: Oshkosh Defense; issued May 31, 2011)

OSHKOSH, Wis. & LONDON, Ontario --- Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, will present a wide range of world-class vehicle platforms and capabilities at CANSEC 2011, hosted June 1-2 in Ottawa, Ontario.

As the only defense contractor actively manufacturing heavy, medium and light tactical vehicles for the U.S. military and international customers, Oshkosh Defense is applying its mission-proven expertise and capabilities to serve the Canadian Forces. Multiple Oshkosh vehicles have been qualified for the Canadian Department of National Defence’s (DND) Standard Military Portion (SMP) of the Medium Support Vehicle System (MSVS) and the Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) programs.

“We’ve been working with the DND for many years now to fully understand the capabilities the soldiers and the Canadian government require from the MSVS and TAPV programs,” said Serge Buchakjian, Oshkosh Defense senior vice president and general manager of International Programs.

“The Oshkosh platforms on display at CANSEC have proven performance in extreme environments, including Afghanistan. Our MSVS and TAPV prototypes, specifically designed to meet DND requirements, are in the product validation and testing phase of our rigorous product development process. In addition to the vehicles themselves, we’ve created life-cycle support solutions through close collaboration with General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada and Oshkosh Corporation’s London Machinery, Inc. (LMI) – all focused on long-term support and economic benefits for Canada.”

On Display at CANSEC

Oshkosh Defense will display two of its three vehicles down-selected for the MSVS program, the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) A4 and the Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement (MTVR). The third down-selected vehicle is the Oshkosh Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV), a proven, maneuverable platform that enhances unit mobility, safely transports troops and hauls equipment in support of a wide range of tactical operations.

More than 27,500 HEMTTs have been produced in multiple variants to fulfill a wide range of logistics operations for militaries across the globe. The latest generation of this 11.8 tonne-payload vehicle features an armored cab, which can be augmented with standardized, bolt-on kits allowing forces to more easily, quickly and cost-effectively increase protection based on mission requirements.

The MTVR was built to operate extensively in off-road missions and uses the Oshkosh TAK-4 independent suspension system to help achieve a 70 percent off-road profile capability. More than 10,000 MTVRs have been deployed with the U.S. Armed Forces.

Oshkosh also will have its MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle Multi Mission Vehicle (M-ATV MMV) and SandCat protected, multi-role vehicle on display. The M-ATV is currently providing much-needed levels of protection and mobility to allied forces in Afghanistan. The M-ATV MMV was configured for command and control, reconnaissance, and missile carrier operations, and has many commonalities with the TAPV prototype Oshkosh unveiled earlier this year. The SandCat was designed specifically for the international market for military and special operations, security duties, peacekeeping, border patrol, and law enforcement. Oshkosh has received orders for the SandCat from Canada as well as Mexico, Sweden, Bulgaria, Nigeria and Israel.

Oshkosh Defense executives will be on hand at CANSEC to discuss these offerings and more at booth #3036. Oshkosh vehicles will be exhibited in the outside display area.

General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada, located in London, Ontario, Canada, is a business unit of General Dynamics Land Systems of Sterling Heights, Mich. For 34 years, more than 2,200 highly skilled technical employees have designed, manufactured, delivered and supported to global customers a unique family of light armoured vehicles (LAV).

Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, is an industry-leading global designer and manufacturer of tactical military trucks and armoured wheeled vehicles, delivering a full product line of conventional and hybrid vehicles, advanced armour options, proprietary suspensions and vehicles with payloads that can exceed 70 tons. Oshkosh Defense provides a global service and supply network including full life-cycle support and remanufacturing, and its vehicles are recognized the world over for superior performance, reliability and protection.

-ends-

buglerbilly
01-06-11, 06:04 PM
Musing late at night, seeing as I rarely now go to bed before 1-2 AM, I was wondering what's happening to the SRATS program................

The top news item is from late February this year 2011................. the video from late August last year

AUSA: Speedy SRATS Tested in Afghanistan

By kris osborn

Published: 28 Feb 10:46 EST (05:46 GMT)

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The U.S. Army's Rapid Equipping Force is testing three high-speed, lightweight, off-road vehicles in Afghanistan designed to quickly move soldiers and equipment through mountainous terrain.

The Specialized Reconnaissance Assault Transport System (SRATS) vehicles were delivered to Force units in Afghanistan in December; after testing, the vehicles are expected to join operational units there.

Developed by BAE Systems, the 3- to 4-ton SRATS can carry four soldiers and 1 ton of cargo on and off-road at speeds up to 100 mph.

"It is an interim light tactical vehicle designed to meet a specific mission profile space. It is low weight, high mobility and has lots of speed," said Jeffrey Earley, a BAE business-development director, said at the winter 2008 Association of the U.S. Army show here. "Speed is important because of the need to escape and deal with the kinds of missions that are going on in Afghanistan. It [the SRATS] is more lightly protected than a Humvee because of the speed and mobility it has. It is for an off-road kind of environment up in the hills."

The SRATS has a litter carrier for ambulance work, and future models will likely be built with weapon stations as well, Earley said.

The vehicle has an Allison transmission, a 400-amp alternator, and a 6.5 V8 turbodiesel engine.

"The Humvee has a rigid suspension in a flexible cab. This [SRATS] is the reverse; it has a flexible suspension in a rigid cab," Earley said.

- Ends -


Uploaded by DanieruShidebuteru on Aug 30, 2010
The ELSORV (Enhanced Logistics Off-Road Vehicle) is a new military vehicle for the United States Army that was developed by SRATS (Specialized Reconnaissance Assault and Transport System) Incorporated. It resembles a Humvee but with much more agility and off-road capability. It is based on a similar vehicle designed for SOCOM (Special Operations Command) over the last five years.

The vehicle can carry four passengers and 2,700 pounds payload, and have modified Humvee engines that can conquer approach angles of 90 degrees and climb slopes at 80 degrees.

The new vehicle is designed to help alleviate maneuverability constraints in the rugged terrains of Afghanistan for resupply and med-evac purposes.

Sources:

http://www.army.mil/-news/2008/06/09/9753-off-road-prototype-vehicles-tested-in-afghanistan/

http://www.arcent.army.mil/news/feature-stories/2008-archive/june/soldiers-in-afghanistan-test-new-off-road-prototypes--%28june-9%29.aspx

Footage:
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buglerbilly
03-06-11, 01:21 AM
Active Protection Reinforces Armor

Jun 2, 2011

By Paul McLeary, David Eshel
Washington, Tel Aviv



I may be blowing sand up my ass BUT I thought IED's were the major threat to armoured and soft skin vehicles NOT RPG's? I can see the benefit when in Other Area scenario's against a more sophisticated enemy but even here IF Bar/slat Armour works as well why bother adding this? Does it provide a significant weight benefit as in far lighter? The pic above doesn't seem to indicate so...............cost-wise it has to be far more costly.

There may never be an armor system that can’t be overcome by force, trickery or volume of fire. Nothing withstands everything. But that doesn’t stop the Pentagon from trying to find one.

According to documents released for fiscal 2012, the Pentagon’s research arm says it plans to deploy the Iron Curtain Active Protection System (IC-APS) to Afghanistan this year or next. Developed by Artis LLC of Herndon, Va., with funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa), the system spent years in testing with Darpa but has been handed off to the Army’s Rapid Equipping Force, according to budget documents Darpa filed with Congress this year. There is uncertainty about the system, since despite the deployment schedule the documents lay out, no one from the Pentagon or industry is talking about it, and the Iron Curtain page on Darpa’s website recently disappeared.

The original system was designed with an array of downward-facing countermeasures mounted along the roof of a vehicle and along the edges of its hood. When the system’s radar detects an incoming round, a distributed optical sensor quickly classifies the threat and deploys a countermeasure when the projectile is inches from the vehicle, deflagrating the warhead. This occurs, Darpa has said, with minimal risk to vehicle occupants, or to people nearby.

In fiscal 2012 budget documents Darpa provided to Congress, the agency reported that its Iron Curtain and Crosshairs programs are being melded into one system and being readied for “transition to combat forces in the 2010-11 time frame.”

Crosshairs, developed by Mustang Technology Group of Allen, Texas, uses the Boomerang acoustic gunshot-detection sensor from Raytheon subsidiary BBN Technologies to cue the vehicle’s remote-operated gun to detect, locate and engage shooters.

Darpa announced last October that Crosshairs was deploying to Afghanistan, and in its fiscal 2012 request to Congress it zeroed out funding for the program, as opposed to the previous year’s request for $3.9 million. But the 2012 document also states that “the Crosshairs sensor system is being integrated with the IC-APS on four up-armored vehicles,” after which “the Crosshairs system will be ready for field testing.” The Army first announced it was integrating the two systems in 2009, when it awarded an $8 million contract to the Mustang Group to fit 25 Crosshairs sniper-detection systems on Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected (MRAP) vehicles, and to begin integrating them with Iron Curtain.

Marrying Crosshairs with the previously experimental—and yet to be deployed—IC-APS would be a huge step in protection capability for U.S. forces, allowing moving vehicles to detect, locate and defeat enemy snipers and incoming rocket-propelled grenades (RPG).

Giving extra weight to Darpa’s statement that it wants to deploy the integrated system this year, is the involvement of the Army’s Rapid Equipping Force and the MRAP project manager’s office in testing “to validate the capabilities and initiate transition to combat forces,” according to the request. In fiscal 2010, the documents state, Darpa “completed integration of the IC-APS and [a Mustang Group sensor system called] CrossCue,” and “validated system performance and field-worthiness through testing by the Army Test and Evaluation Command.”

When contacted, Darpa refused comment, referring an inquiry to its website. The Rapid Equipping Force also refused to comment. The Defense Department handed questions off to Darpa, and Artis and Mustang did not return calls. Chief among the questions about the system is how it would fare against the RPG-30, a tandem-charge weapon that launches a decoy round to activate an APS, thus allowing the warhead to penetrate the defense. Also in question is how the system differentiates between what is and isn’t a threat.

A representative of Marine Corps Systems Command—which runs the MRAP office—refused to comment specifically, but wrote in an e-mail: “We are assessing the maturity of the technology to determine the potential to meet an urgent requirement from theater. As in any capability assessment it would include performance in an array of operational conditions that is representative of theater environments. While some of those relevant conditions have proven successful, the system must fully demonstrate the required performance across the operational conditions.”

Israel is interested in such a capability, and has developed several APS to neutralize incoming threats, ranging from advanced tandem RPGs to the latest antitank missiles such as the laser-guided Kornet-E from Russia. The Trophy APS, from Rafael Advanced Defense Systems, recently proved effective against a Hamas-launched Kornet rocket, destroying the missile and keeping the targeted tank untouched (DTI April, p. 10).

The most recent test of a system took place in Germany, involving an MRAP vehicle fitted with the Iron Fist APS developed by Israel Military Industries (IMI). The system withstood numerous rocket attacks during two months of testing and an associated evaluation program. Iron Fist uses passive and active sensors for threat detection, situational awareness and fire control. The system employs an electro-optical “soft kill” countermeasure and “hard kill” interceptors that are launched against incoming rounds, covering a broader spectrum of threats than an RPG-dedicated close-in-type APS.

Unlike the questions surrounding the Iron Curtain system, Iron Fist has demonstrated that its combination of soft- and hard-kill methods defeats RPGs and guided missiles, including advanced models fitted with tandem warheads, as well as antitank rounds. The IMI system also contributes to situational awareness and counteraction. Iron Fist accurately identifies enemy firing positions, enabling a rapid counterstrike, thus eliminating another attack from a targeted position.

In January, two APS from Rafael, Trophy and Trophy Light, were tested, delivering impressive results. For the U.S. defense secretary’s evaluation, Rafael integrated a Trophy APS on an IDF Stryker armored fighting vehicle utilizing a new system configuration optimized for the vehicle. The Stryker system featured the standard four-panel WindGuard radar, along with countermeasures on each side of the vehicle.

In addition to the two main hard-kill systems, Trophy and Iron Fist, there are parallel developments in soft-kill techniques—an integrated sense-respond-strike system called ESP, developed by Elbit Land Systems, which uses integrated, panoramic infrared (IR) sensors, laser-detection systems and a directional IR jammer on a single mast. The system provides the crew with full situational awareness, missile-launch warning and effective countermeasures against missile threats while protected under closed hatches.

IMI has also integrated a laser jammer into Iron Fist. The system intercepted two Russian-made AT-7 Metis short-range guided antitank missiles recently in a test conducted in the U.S. During the test, Iron Fist also performed flawlessly against other threats, employing hard-kill interceptors against two other Metis weapons, and defeating three kinetic projectiles, also with its hard-kill defense. Overall, the system scored 100% against seven shots.

After a decade of roadside bombs and RPG attacks on U.S. and NATO vehicles in Afghanistan and Iraq, and on Israeli vehicles in Lebanon and Gaza, militaries have learned how much extra armor vehicles can take before mobility suffers, powertrains are overtaxed, and suspensions give out. Damage to the armor, however, hasn’t been as easy to diagnose.

That’s why a team that includes Thomas Meitzler of the U.S. Army’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, is working on a “smart armor” system that uses transducers embedded in individual plates to monitor the real-time health of vehicle armor, transmitting that information to the crew and to mechanics back at base.

Inside the vehicle, the panels are represented by images on a Blue Force tracking screen—green for an undamaged plate, black for a damaged plate and flashing red if a plate is coming under fire. While the transducers aren’t capable of recording data for historical analysis, the computer network they feed back to at base records damage data to build a historical picture of where and how armor damage occurs.

Meitzler says the transducer technology is also being evaluated for its ability to locate the direction of small-arms fire. “When we learn more about the signal processing associated with different kinds of bullets,” he says, “we’ll be able to identify the type of bullet being fired based on its acoustic signature.”

The tests so far “are very encouraging,” he adds, particularly because the Army is learning more about the acoustic fingerprints of different rounds and how the sensors withstand ballistic shock. The technology isn’t near being operational, Meitzler admits, but it might be part of the next generation of soldier protection.

Photo: DARPA

buglerbilly
03-06-11, 10:52 AM
Via Soldier Systems...............

The JAMMA from Force Protection

June 3rd, 2011



Looks-wise, it kind of reminds me of an old DUKW that mated with a Mazda pickup but it’s something altogether different. The new Joint All-Terrain Modular Mobility Asset (JAMMA) from Force Protection (think Cougar MRAP) is a lightweight mobility asset. While they are keeping many of the specs close to the vest, as you can see it features a unique roll over protection system and can be fitted with an optional state-of-the-art hybrid, multi-fuel engine that generates 22kW of continuous exportable power. Currently, Utility, Gun Truck, and Rescue variants have been configured but the architecture of the design allows for multiple other uses. Additionally, it is fitted with an electric winch, on-board air compressor, open electrical architecture for the fitting of specialized equipment, as well as a built in armor attachment system for the fitting of scalable armor panels to correspond to various threats.



SOCOM is on the lookout for a new Ground Mobility Vehicle System (ver 1.1) to replace their HMMWV-based trucks currently in service. Keep your eyes peeled for it to kick off in September. Consequently, SOFIC was packed with mobility systems.



While the SOCOM requirement is for an MH47 compatible vehicle, the JAMMA even fits (just barely) in a V22 Osprey. This is becuase it is offered in both wide (MH47) and narrow (CV22) track versions.



The search for a V22-compatible Internally Transportable Vehicle (ITV) with sufficient range and load capacity for SOF use has been an ongoing issue since the 90s. The search for this mythical beast still lives on as a joint requirement for both SOCOM and USMC. The problem is the cabin size of the V22. When the tilt-rotor was first envisioned it was expected to replace one-for-one, every CH46 in the Marine Corps inventory. The USMC as lead service wrote a requirement based on the CH46, giving it the same cabin size and cargo capacity as the Sea Knight. When the CH46 was designed they still used JEEPs. However, in the 30 odd years the Osprey spent in development hell, the US military mothballed the M151 JEEP due to its limited cargo capacity and propensity to roll over thanks to a narrow wheel base. The V22 was perfect for a JEEP but nothing with a wide enough stance to remain stable while maneuvering under fire would fit. The search remains with all forms of expandable wheel bases and crouching suspensions attempting to fill the requirement. As of yet, nothing that fits in the CV22 (SOCOM will eventually own 50) seems to fill the rest of SOCOM’s unique needs.


GROWLER - Biggest over-priced POS this or any other Century.................:jerkit

The Marine Corps is pretty much in the same boat although they have purchased a more modern variant of the venerable JEEP called the Growler that features an active suspension for use as their ITV. The Growler began life as a prime mover for the Expeditionary Fire Support System and has been procured in limited numbers by the Marines. Unfortunately, it takes several minutes of prep time in order to configure it for the tight squeeze into the rear of an Osprey.

Force Protection has been applying lessons learned from their production of larger vehicles into the development of the JAMMA. The transportation infrastructure in Afghanistan is very limited, and what is there cannot be used by heavily armored vehicles. It is imperative that smaller and lighter vehicles are developed for this type of terrain.

www.forceprotection.net

buglerbilly
03-06-11, 12:38 PM
BAE Systems Announce Strategic Teaming Agreements for TAPV Program in Canada

(Source: BAE Systems; issued June 2, 2011)



OTTAWA, Canada --- The Canadian Army’s Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) program, which will provide hundreds of next generation wheeled combat vehicles to Canadian Forces, is at the center of two teaming agreements recently entered into by BAE Systems.

Along with the leading edge RG35 Reconnaissance, Patrol and Utility solution—which was unveiled in early May—BAE Systems has leveraged its extensive automotive and defense-wide expertise to offer a comprehensive in-service support solution to provide optimal operational readiness and availability of the TAPV equipment.

Through teaming with DEW Engineering and Thales Canada, Canadian-based industries will be at the heart of the delivery and in-service support of the BAE Systems’ TAPV solution. This Team will not only produce a TAPV solution that will provide Canadian Forces with superior protection and mobility in theatre, but through its close partnerships, it will create and maintain long lasting, high quality jobs in Canada.

DEW Engineering will provide design services, add-on-armour and vehicle assembly as part of this agreement. In-service support to include vehicle repair, field service support, technical publications and material support is also part of the DEW Engineering share of work on TAPV.

“We are pleased to have the opportunity to team with BAE Systems on the TAPV program, and offer Canada a superior vehicle platform with tremendous growth potential, and an Industrial participation package that will provide long term benefits for Canadian Industry in all regions of the country”, said Ian Marsh, President of DEW Engineering.

“By joining forces with DEW Engineering and Thales Canada, we’re confident we have the best strategic partnerships in place to deliver on all aspects of the TAPV program,” said Alan Garwood, Group Business Development Director at BAE Systems. " It’s a team dedicated to ensuring the soldier comes first, dedicated to producing and maintaining the safest and most reliable TAPV solution; and dedicated to continued investment in Canadian industry. The heart of the BAE Systems strategy is working in partnerships around the globe bringing jobs and technology to those markets”, added Garwood.

As the Combat Systems Integrator, Thales Canada will provide the Vehicle Electronic Architecture (VEA) including the complete combat system suite, design, production material and systems support through the life of the program.

“Thales Canada is known for its competitive systems solutions and integration skills, we look forward to providing a low-risk Canadian designed solution to BAE Systems and the Canadian Army that will meet and exceed the stated TAPV requirements,” added Paul Kahn, President and CEO of Thales Canada.

With extensive experience in the tactical wheeled vehicle and protective systems market, BAE Systems is well positioned to meet the requirements of the Canadian Army. The company has a track record of producing more than 5,000 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles for the US Forces and over 3,500 RG series vehicles globally.

The Canadian Department of National Defense (DND) expects to award a contract to the final selected bidder by early 2012.

-ends-

buglerbilly
03-06-11, 12:51 PM
DEW Engineering and BAE Systems Team on Medium Support Vehicle System Program for Canada

(Source: BAE Systems; issued June 2, 2011)

OTTAWA, Canada --- One of the Canadian Army’s land programs is the focus of a teaming agreement entered into by DEW Engineering & Development and BAE Systems. Together, the two companies will collaborate on Canada’s Medium Support Vehicle System (MSVS) program, which will provide the Canadian Army with a new fleet of medium-sized logistics trucks for both regular forces and reserve troops and create further jobs in Canada.

With extensive experience in the tactical wheeled vehicle and protective systems market, BAE Systems is well positioned to meet the requirements of the Canadian Army. The company has a track record of producing more than 70,000 medium tactical trucks and trailers in 17 variants for the U.S. Army and other allied nations, and over 5,000 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles.

"DEW Engineering and Development is pleased to be teaming with BAE Systems for the Canadian Medium Support Vehicle System – Standard Military Pattern Vehicle Program (MSVS SMP). We believe that BAE Systems offers the most comprehensive understanding globally of the MSVS SMP vehicle from both a production and support perspective. DEW looks forward to supporting both BAE Systems and the Canadian Military on this program on a wide variety of fronts”, stated Craig Campbell, Vice President of Business Development at DEW.

DEW Engineering & Development is a preeminent firm in Canada for land vehicle refit and refurbishment, as well as add-on armor protection systems. DEW has completed several programs for the Canadian Army, including extensive repair and refit work to the Army's light armored vehicle fleet, and major upgrade modifications to the Army's Leopard tanks. Most recently, they entered into a multi-year life extension program for the Army's M113 family of vehicles, to improve the vehicles’ mobility, firepower and protection, ensuring that it will be one of the safest vehicles in its class. DEW Engineering & Development is also the prime contractor for the baseline shelter on the MSVS program.

“By aligning with DEW Engineering & Development, we have an opportunity to combine our proven, high-quality tactical vehicle and associated systems pedigree with DEW’s detailed knowledge of and extensive experience with Canadian vehicle and customization requirements,” said Chris Chambers, Vice President and General Manager with BAE Systems’ Tactical Wheeled Vehicle product line. “Our goal is to deliver the very best to the Canadian Forces—the very best in a tactical support system, in lifetime sustainment support and value,” added Chambers.

BAE Systems has worked alongside DEW Engineering & Development on the M113 life extension program since 1999 and recently signed another agreement to partner with DEW on the Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) program.

-ends-

buglerbilly
10-06-11, 01:34 PM
Oshkosh Defense to Supply New and Recapitalized Heavy Tactical Vehicles for U.S. Army

More than 10,000 military vehicles have been restored to “zero miles” condition by Oshkosh

OSHKOSH, Wis. (June 9, 2011) — Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE:OSK), will deliver more than 730 trucks from the U.S. Army’s Family of Heavy Tactical Vehicles (FHTV), including new and recapitalized Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) A4s and new Heavy Equipment Transporter (HET) A1s, following orders from TACOM Life Cycle Management Command (LCMC).

Oshkosh recently reached a major milestone with more than 10,000 heavy and medium-payload vehicles restored to zero-hours, zero-miles condition for the U.S. Army, National Guard and Marine Corps. Oshkosh recapitalizes and remanufactures vehicles for the U.S. military as part of the company’s extensive life-cycle support and aftermarket services program. Through recapitalization, heavily used vehicles are stripped to their frame rails and rebuilt to like-new condition.

“The restoration of more than 10,000 military-class vehicles is a significant achievement in our continuing support of the military’s fleet management strategy,” said Mike Ivy, vice president and general manager of Army Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “Oshkosh Defense has recapitalized and retrofit vehicles for more than 40 years, significantly increasing their life-span and offering great value to military customers, and equipping soldiers with the latest vehicle safety, survivability, and mobility technologies.”

To meet the latest HEMTT A4 configuration, the suspension in the recapitalized vehicle is improved and a fully air-conditioned and armor-ready cab is installed, in addition to a more powerful drivetrain. The vehicles have new components, new technology and a new “zero hours/zero miles” bumper-to-bumper warranty, at a considerable cost savings to the government. Oshkosh also has refurbished more than 2,000 heavy-payload vehicles in theater, including vehicles originally built by other manufacturers, as part of the Army’s Theater Provided Equipment Refurbishment (TPER) program.

The HEMTT A4 is the backbone of the Army’s logistics and resupply fleet, and is available in multiple variants for a wide range of operations. The Light Equipment Transporter (LET) variant is included in the orders and is equipped with durable components to provide optimal maneuverability and versatility in rugged terrain. Its anti-lock braking system, traction and air-ride suspension allow troops to navigate wherever the mission demands while transporting light-duty equipment.

The HET is designed to rapidly transport battle tanks, fighting and recovery vehicles, armored vehicles and construction equipment, as well as their crews, so they arrive in mission-ready condition. The latest Oshkosh HET A1 configuration includes increased horsepower, a six-person armor ready cab, higher capacity front suspension, electrical upgrades, and improved diagnostics and standard air conditioning.

The U.S. Army’s heavy fleet, currently in production by Oshkosh Defense, also includes the Palletized Load System (PLS). Production of the new HEMTT A4s and HETs on these awards is expected to begin in April 2012 and be completed in September 2012. Recapitalization of the HEMTT A4s began in May and is scheduled to be completed in September 2012. Together, these orders have a value of more than $252 million.

buglerbilly
10-06-11, 08:02 PM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

Congress Has Doubts About JLTV Program

Posted by Paul McLeary at 6/10/2011 12:21 PM CDT



The House Appropriations Committee’s markup for the fiscal year 2012 defense budget calls for a $50 million cut in funding for research, development and testing of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program, the Army/Marine Corps joint project to replace up to 50,000 HMMWVs staring in 2016.

Thanks to the planned refit and recapitalization of over 50,000 Army and about 3,400 Marine HMMWvs, the Committee writes that “the operational niche to be filled by the JLTV appears to be shrinking,” even though it supports the services’ continued work on the vehicle. There is a caveat to its support, however. The markup notes that while the services should continue their JLTV work, their ambitions should be curtailed “until such a time as it becomes clear that there is a threat to be countered for which the JLTV is better suited than HMMWVs, MRAPs, or MATVs, or the current fleets of HMMWVs and MRAPs are judged to be not economically repairable.”

At the same time to Committee wants to take $50 million away from the JLTV program, it wants to invest an extra $50 million in to the nascent HMMWV recapitalization program, which is still waiting on Requests for Proposal from the Army and the Corps to get moving. The Marines have been expressing reservations about the JLTV for some time, due to weight and cost issues, but the latest markup does little to bolster the program’s stature, saying that the HMMWV recap could produce “survivability equal to or better than the MRAP, weight considerably less than predicted for the JLTV, and at a cost significantly less than either.” To reach the $50 million in cuts, the Army’s JLTV budget of $172 million, and the Corps’ budget of $39 million, would each be sliced by $25 million, according to the Committee’s recommendations.

buglerbilly
11-06-11, 04:11 AM
U.S. House Panel Hits JLTV, Cuts $50M From R&D

By MICHAEL HOFFMAN

Published: 10 Jun 2011 15:00

Blast venting is gonna do shit for a standard up-armoured Hummer, it does begin to get relevancy for the recapitalised ones once they decide which Manufacturers proposals they are gong to proceed with BUT whichever one it is the recap'd vehicles are total rebuilds with ARMOURED hulls, etc and truck-style suspensions (ala TAK-4) to suit the increased weight and provide increased ride height (and X-terrain ability)..............to be honest, with M-ATV in increasing numbers in the field and this Hummer recap, I'm not sure that there IS a place for JLTV any more?

U.S. lawmakers took another swipe at the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, hatcheting $50 million off the Army and Marine Corps' 2012 research and development budget request, according to the House Appropriations defense subcommittee's review of the 2012 defense spending bill.

The committee recommended the Army use the money subtracted from the JLTV program toward researching "survivability enhancements" for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle highlighting the potential for "blast venting technology."

Repeatedly brought up in hearings and commended by Army Secretary John McHugh, the committee again showed their support for what is called the blast chimney, which directs blast energy through the vehicle by way of a vent no wider than a laptop.

"These improvements could lead to a HMMWV with survivability equal to or better than the [Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle], weigh considerably less than predicted for the JLTV, and at a cost significantly less than the other," the subcommittee's report read.

Performance by the HMMWV, MRAP and MRAP All Terrain Vehicle (MATV) over the past 10 years in Iraq and Afghanistan has called into question the need for delivery of the JLTV by 2016, according to the review.

Marine Corps leaders have raised concerns with the JLTV's weight and transportability. Many of the same questions have been raised for the Army's other major tactical vehicle program, the Ground Combat Vehicle.

"The committee notes that the operational niche to be filled by the JLTV appears to be shrinking," according to the subcommittee's report.

buglerbilly
14-06-11, 02:24 AM
USMC orders 471 MaxxPro vehicles

June 13, 2011



Navistar Defense, LLC today announced that it received a $357 million delivery order for an additional 471 International MaxxPro Dash vehicles with DXM independent suspension. The order from the US Marine Corps Systems Command follows last month's delivery order for 250 MaxxPro Dash Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) ambulances.

Navistar has quickly grown its fleet of MaxxPro vehicles to more than 8,700 units by leveraging its current commercial capabilities and assets, which includes the proven commercial International WorkStar platform. First, the company added the DXM independent suspension solution capability to new production vehicles. This was followed by orders for the new MaxxPro Recovery vehicle and most recently the MaxxPro Dash ambulance. The company has also developed a MaxxPro flatbed truck.

"We have nine major MaxxPro variants in or on their way to theater today thanks to the flexibility of our proven vehicle platforms," said Archie Massicotte, president, Navistar Defense. "The MaxxPro Dash was the first MRAP to be modified specifically for the Afghan terrain and we have continued to enhance its capabilities all along the way. Keeping our warfighters equipped is priority one."

While the MaxxPro family of vehicles has contributed to Navistar's growth into new markets, the company has fielded more than 32,000 vehicles since 2004. This includes sales of the MaxxPro, International MXT, as well as vehicles based on the International PayStar and WorkStar platforms.

Production of the new units will occur in Garland, Texas, and West Point, Miss. Deliveries will be completed by September 2011. MaxxPro Dash vehicles are powered by MaxxForce 9.3D engines.

Source: Navistar International

buglerbilly
17-06-11, 03:16 PM
Friday, June 17, 2011, 09:22 AM

Force Protection unveils the Ocelot vehicle weapons pod variant at Protected Mobility Exhibition.

Impressive evidence of the modular capabilities of the UK designed and built Ocelot vehicle will be on display at Protected Mobility Display & Sustainability Conference (Millbroook, June 22 and 23) when Force Protection Europe (FPE) unveils the Ocelot vehicle weapons pod variant of this versatile newcomer on Stand SP19.


Force protection Ocelot vehicle weapons pod variant

The Ocelot weapons pod variant, which provides enhanced protection for fire support and special operations teams, can be integrated easily between missions to the standard chassis using light lift equipment. It can be fitted with manned or remote weapon systems using the standard ring on the WMIK* -like roll cage or a pintle mount.

POD without the chassis..............

buglerbilly
22-06-11, 02:18 PM
This can apply to ALL armour, wheeled or tracked....................

IMI’s Iron Fist APS Completes RPG, Missile, and Tank Ammo Jamming and Interception Tests by the US OSD

(Source: Israel Military Industries; issued June 21, 2011)

Iron Fist, the active protection system (APS) for armored vehicles developed by Israel Military Industries (IMI), officially completed its evaluation trials conducted by the U.S. Office of Secretary of Defense (OSD) as part of a congressionally mandated evaluation of domestic and foreign APS.

Prior to the tests the Iron Fist was integrated onto a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle (MRAP) and its US OSD evaluation was split into two phases.

The first evaluation phase, ended in August 2010, tested the Iron Fist against Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPG) ‘hard kill’ (physical interception of the incoming threat) scenarios. The second phase, ended in April 2011, tested the Iron Fist in a variety of ‘soft kill’ (electro-optic directional jamming) and ‘hard kill’ scenarios against Anti Tank Guided Missiles (ATGMs). During both evaluation phases, the Iron Fist APS demonstrated performance capabilities for each test scenario.

Just after the completion of the US OSD evaluation IMI has successfully demonstrated, at the same proving ground, additional interception series, this time of 120 mm kinetic-energy (KE) tank rounds.

IMI’s APS portfolio includes its man-portable ‘Shock Absorber, a situational awareness system combined with ‘soft kill’ directional jammer, and its light-weight ‘Bright Arrow’, a remotely operated weapon station combined with ‘soft kill’ and ‘hard kill’ APS that is intended for installation on light armored vehicles such as HMMWVs.

The Iron Fist APS uses passive and active sensors for threat detection, situational awareness and fire control. The system can employ both an electro-optical ‘soft kill’ countermeasure and ‘hard kill’ interceptors that are launched against incoming threats and effectively defeats RPGs, guided missiles, including advanced models fitted with tandem warheads, as well as tank rounds. In addition to the protection by soft and hard kill means Iron Fist accurately identifies the enemy firing positions, enabling rapid counter-strike thus eliminating repeated attacks.

The Iron Fist is currently at final stages of its full-scale development (FSD).

-ends-

buglerbilly
22-06-11, 02:24 PM
SKYDEX, Oshkosh Sign Multiple Agreements to Install Blast Mitigating Flooring in More Than 1,400 Vehicles


An Oshkosh Defense MAT-V being deployed to Afghanistan by a C-17 transport aircraft.

07:09 GMT, June 22, 2011 DENVER | SKYDEX Technologies, Inc. announced today that it has signed multiple agreements with Oshkosh Defense to supply its blast mitigating flooring systems for over 1,400 new Oshkosh M-ATV tactical vehicles. The agreements will be completed by September 2011.

The U.S. government has made SKYDEX convoy decking a standard part of the rear section of the M-ATV since production began in 2009. Oshkosh has subsequently outfitted the driver, gunner and commander sections in the front of existing M-ATVs with SKYDEX convoy decking.

SKYDEX has been manufacturing and installing its patented twin hemisphere blast mitigating flooring into armored vehicles since 2008. SKYDEX has worked with the major manufacturers of the MRAP, M-ATV and Double V-Hull vehicles to increase the blast survivability for the troops inside. Since 2008, SKYDEX has installed its products into more than 12,500 vehicles worldwide.

“SKYDEX products save lives. It’s that simple. Our blast mitigating flooring significantly increases survivability and decreases the chance of injury to the occupants of these vehicles during IED (improvised explosive devices) explosions, the major cause of casualties in Afghanistan,” said President and CEO Mike Buchen. “We are excited to be working with Oshkosh to provide the best possible protection for our troops.”

The SKYDEX Convoy Deck has already been installed in thousands of Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles in Afghanistan and Iraq, including the RG-31, Cougar and Oshkosh M-ATV. Earlier this year, General Dynamics Land Systems – Canada (GDLS-C) signed a multi-million-dollar agreement with SKYDEX to provide its Convoy Deck for 200 new Stryker Double V-Hull (DVH) vehicles deploying to Afghanistan. In addition, the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) signed an agreement to install the decking into 1,000 M-ATV vehicles.

Independent testing demonstrates that SKYDEX blast-mitigating technology greatly reduces the threat of lower leg injuries by diminishing the force of an IED blast reaching personnel aboard an armored vehicle. The testing demonstrated that during a typical blast force without the SKYDEX Convoy Deck, vehicle occupants face a 100 percent chance of injury. Adding SKYDEX decking drastically reduces the chance of injury to about 10 percent. Testing was done according to NATO’s STANAG 4569 protection standards and thresholds.

buglerbilly
23-06-11, 12:37 AM
Pentagon Seeks To Transfer $182M for Humvee Recap

By KATE BRANNEN

Published: 22 Jun 2011 16:29

The Pentagon is asking Congress for approval to shift $182 million away from buying new Humvees toward upgrading the U.S. Army's existing fleet of trucks, according to a new reprogramming request.

The Army needs to improve the survivability of the vehicle because the current Humvee cannot withstand the blast from improvised explosive devices, according to the document signed June 10 by Pentagon Comptroller Robert Hale.

During a review of its tactical wheeled vehicle portfolio, the Army determined it had already bought enough Humvees and decided the money would be better spent upgrading the trucks in its inventory.

"Rather than procure additional vehicles, the Army plans to recapitalize portions of its existing fleet with survivability and mobility enhancements," the reprogramming request says.

The $182 million will go toward these improvements, including an enhanced power train and improved suspension "to increase the weight-carrying capability, support for enhanced crew protection, and safety upgrades," according to the reprogramming request.

The power train upgrades should reduce sustainment costs by reducing fuel consumption.

"Survivability and safety enhancements include relocating the batteries away from the crew compartment and moving the fuel tank to provide additional ballistic protection," the request says.

The funds will be used to upgrade an estimated 1,200 of the Army's 154,000 Humvees.

"In a separate action, DoD has requested funds to pursue the 'chimney' upgrade to the [Humvee]," the reprogramming request says.

The Marine Corps and the Army have been working with the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to finish testing on the structural blast channel - colloquially called the "chimney" - and other new vehicle features expected to protect against roadside bombs. Humvee maker AM General teamed up with Hardwire LLC to install the chimneys into the vehicles.

The chimney is designed to vent explosive blast energy through the center of the vehicle, protecting the crew inside and keeping the vehicle on the ground. The results of the testing remain classified, but the goal is to give the Humvee the protection of a mine resistant ambush protected vehicle at a significantly lower weight.

The Corps evaluated the mobility and operability of vehicles outfitted with the chimney, while the Army oversaw survivability testing.

Not the First Time

The service first asked Congress more than a year ago if it could shift procurement funds toward the Humvee upgrade effort.

In March, Defense Secretary Robert Gates chastised the House Appropriations Committee for holding up a $1.2 billion reprogramming request because it included transferring money away from buying new Humvees to purchasing gear to protect forward operating bases in Afghanistan.

Since that public dispute, the House panel has thrown its support behind the effort, particularly the new chimney technology.

buglerbilly
24-06-11, 02:31 AM
Video: Genius Computer Stops Rockets Right Before Impact

By Noah Shachtman June 23, 2011 | 12:00 pm



Blowing up rockets in midflight is easy — as long as you’ve got a fast enough computer.

That’s the thinking at Artis, the Virginia firm trying to outfit the Army’s armored vehicles with so-called “active protection” technology — defenses that can stop incoming projectiles before they ever have a chance to hit. If the approach works, it could not only protect U.S. forces from rockets and missiles. It could shield troops from the most lethal roadside bombs, as well.

Rocket-propelled grenades and anti-tank missiles are some of the most potent weapons in the guerrilla arsenal, because they can punch through even the thickest armor. The Israelis, for instance, saw 40 of their tanks get hit by the projectiles in their 2006 war in Lebanon. So U.S. and Israeli defense contractors have tried all sorts of ways to blast these munitions while they’re still hurtling toward their target — to hit one speeding bullet with another, essentially.

But pulling off that trick shot requires a whole bunch of split-second calculations: from detecting the incoming rocket to figuring out its flight pattern to deciding when to fire the countermeasure. To do it all, you need a whole heap of processing power.

“Active protection is a testament to how fast computers are these days — especially when you’re not burdening them, by running an operating system,” says Artis CEO Keith Brendley.

Artis’ approach is a little more algorithm-intensive than others. Rather than blast the projectile early in its flight, Artis’ Iron Curtain system waits to fire its countermeasure until the very, very last moment, when the munition is just a few inches away from ramming into its target. Iron Curtain doesn’t shoot out at the projectile. Mounted on the vehicle’s roof, it shoots straight down.

The idea is to minimize the harm to any civilians nearby — and to get as good a look at the incoming munition as possible before firing. But waiting does have a drawback; it means those life-or-death, bullet-on-bullet calculations have to be made even quicker that they would ordinarily.

“The further away from the vehicle, the harder the problem becomes,” Brendley, a former computer modeler at the Rand Corporation, tells Wired.com. “Which would you bet on: the physics becoming easier or the computers getting faster?”

Iron Curtain has pulled off the feat dozens of times in military trials, and is now undergoing safety reviews and component-level testing by the Army’s program manager for blast-resistant vehicles. Once that $5 million testing period is done — likely by the end of the year — it’s on to limited user tests, where the Iron Curtain will be mounted on the armored, off-road vehicles currently used in Afghanistan. The system won’t be heading to the war zone immediately, despite what you may have read in previous reports. But by this time next year, limited production of Iron Curtain could be underway.

Brendley, meanwhile, is looking for even tougher targets to knock down. Rocket-propelled grenades fly at 295 meters per second — pretty damn fast. But Iron Curtain’s smacked away these weapons so consistently, Brendley started looking at even quicker threats: namely, the explosively formed projectiles that were, for a time, the deadliest weapon of the Iraq insurgency. These “superbombs” fire out armor-piercing jets of molten metal at a blinding two to four kilometers per second — 10 times as fast as the grenades.

Darpa — which originally backed Iron Curtain — provided a bit of cash for Artis to build a “brassboard” pre-prototype for this superbomb-smashing system. In tests held over the Christmas week, the Artis system held its own.

“Even I was surprised,” Brendely says. “Let’s face it: it’s kind of hard to believe you can intercept something that fast.”

buglerbilly
27-06-11, 01:23 PM
DARPA’s Defense Manufacturing Efforts Support White House Vision

(Source: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency; issued June 24, 2011)

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency recognizes that to innovate we must make and to protect we must produce. That understanding has prompted the Agency to plan to invest $1B over five years in manufacturing innovation for defense systems.

During an event today at the National Robotics Engineering Center, President Barack Obama addressed the key roles that advanced research in collaboration with government and industry can play in enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. manufacturing, jumpstarting job creation and the process of bringing ideas to market.

DARPA’s Experimental Crowd-derived Combat Support Vehicle (XC2V) was highlighted as an example of the power of collaboration and the democratization of innovation at the event. The XC2V is the first crowd-sourced, militarily relevant vehicle design. The DARPA XC2V effort, asked non-traditional DoD performers, small businesses, universities and the general public to contribute innovative ideas for a vehicle body designed to accomplish the critical mission tasks of combat resupply and medical evacuation. More than 150 credible designs were submitted, with the winning design taking less than fourteen-weeks to build.

XC2V was a proof of principle project to increase DARPA’s understanding of crowd-sourcing as an approach to the development of complex military platforms in support of the Agency’s Adaptive Vehicle Make (AVM) portfolio of programs.

According to Paul Eremenko, DARPA program manager, “AVM seeks to compress development timelines five-fold to accelerate product development, and lower the barrier to participation in innovation and manufacturing."

-ends-

buglerbilly
27-06-11, 01:26 PM
DARPA's XC2V FLYPMode crowd-sourced combat vehicle revealed, now in desert khaki (video)

By Christopher Trout posted Jun 26th 2011 12:57PM



Okay, so perhaps the specific color here is up for debate, but one thing is clear: the XC2V FLYPMode is one imposing looking vehicle. Also known as the Experimental Crowd-derived Combat Support Vehicle, DARPA has billed this mean machine as the "first crowd-sourced, militarily relevant vehicle design." After being selected as the winning entry to DARPA's design-the-next-Humvee competition, Local Motors tricked out the XC2V FLYPMode in just 14 weeks. For now, it is but a "proof of principle project," meaning we probably won't see this thing riding dirty in the desert anytime soon, if ever. You can, however, see at least a portion of the beast's birth in a time-lapse video after the break.



Uploaded by sixten3 on Jun 18, 2011
Time lapse via Local Motors web cam. The first crowd-sourced military vehicle. Designed by Victor Garcia, built by Local Motors. Video produced by Marc Senger.

buglerbilly
27-06-11, 04:05 PM
Crowd-Driven Combat Support Vehicle Prototype Completed in 98 Days

By tamir_eshel on June 27, 2011 2:18 pm


The Flipmode, designed by Victor Garcia, is designed as an agile, modular and missionized design, based on the Local Motors built chassis. Photo: Local Motors

Last article on this, more for the additional pics.............

After 14 weeks of work, rapid prototyping automotive manufacturer Local Motors has completed the manufacturing of the ‘Flypmode’, the winning design of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)’s ‘Crowd-Driven Combat Support Vehicle’ XC2V.

DARPA’S XC2V Design Challenge asked individuals to co-create a vehicle body design for two different missions – Combat Reconnaissance and Combat Delivery & Evacuation. The FLYPMODE, designed by Victor Garcia won the first prize – $7,500 in cash and to be built into a prototype by Local Motors.

The Flypmode is designed as an agile, modular and missionized design, based on the Local Motors built chassis. The side rails are maintained high to support high mobility over cross country terrain. Yet, some design elements are contributing to the safety and protection of the occupants, such as rapid egress, ingress and egress for the driver and co driver, and attachments for carriage of loads and personal gear around the vehicle, adding to the protection of the crew. The vehicle was designed to a maximum loaded weight of 2,721kg (6,000 lbs), therefore, the use of armor protection would be almost impossible, although designers were required to include potential location for ‘360 degree, horizon to horizon protection’.


A top view of the Flypmode shows the 360 degree visibility offered by the all-round windows. One of the mission requirement for the contest was the use of such vehicle in airbase protection and forward air control role. Photo: Local Motors.

The design offers all-round windows providing 360 degree visibility, suitable for the recce role and improving situational threat awareness. The vehicle has an overall length of 4.55 m’, width of 2.08 m’ and height of 1.98 m’. The internal space can accommodate a driver, commander and between one to three passengers. The rear ramp provides ample space for loads, personal gear or carriage of up to three wounded personnel on standard stretchers.

With winners selected using current methods – the program turns to an analysis of crowd-sourced selection. The next research question becomes, how could crowd-sourced selection contribute to the goals of Defense manufacturing? Fundamental questions remain regarding the role of diversity vice expertise in such design and selection tasks. In the coming weeks DARPA will include potential vehicle end users in alternative engagements. This follow-on study seeks more answers and may allow for a second vehicle to be built. Side-by-side evaluation between crowd-selected and end-user-selected vehicles will be conducted.


Flypmode seen on its first test drive. Photo: Local Motors

© Copyright 2011 - Defense Update

buglerbilly
28-06-11, 04:06 PM
New Pick-Up Truck ZIBAR Hauls 2.8 Tons Anywhere

By noam_eshel on June 28, 2011 2:38 pm


Ido Cohen, Founder of Ido Off-Road Center, Next to The Zibar-MK II. Photo: Noam Eshel, Defense-Update

Ido Off-Road Center, developer of the Zibar is providing here a peek into the new model of Zibar Truck, a heavier, more powerful ‘pick up truck’ version of Zibar Mk II, designed for extreme duty off-road work. Zibar Truck offers almost the same performance and cross-country mobility, carrying loads of 2.8 tons on a large rear mounted flatbed cargo. The truck is powered by a GM Duramax 6.6L diesel engine developing 520 HP, and torque of 850 lb-ft – twice the torque level of the petrol engine used with Zibar Mk II.

Both vehicles have a top speed of 180 km/h, approach angle of 90 degrees, and departure angle of 80 degrees, side slope handling of 60%, and longitudinal slope handling of 100%, 0.8 m’ ditch crossing and 0.75 m’ step climbing. The Zibar Truck can cross water obstacles 1 meter deep.

The first shipment of Zibar Mk II has already been delivered to an international customer and the company is currently negotiating follow-on orders.


The New Zibar Truck Version, Debuting here at Combat 2011 Exhibition. Photo: Noam Eshel, Defense-Update

Copyright © 2011 Defense Update. All Rights Reserved.

buglerbilly
28-06-11, 04:09 PM
Stretched Paramilitary Versions for the Sandcat

By noam_eshel on June 28, 2011 2:39 pm


Plasan Sandcat Police and Border Patrol Version. Photo: Noam Eshel, Defense-Update

Plasan are showing two new models of the SandCat, designed for paramilitary and police missions. Plasan has already delivered a special version of the SandCat to the Israeli border security corps, as well as the Israel police special response units. Plasan has recently delivered 78 SandCats to Israeli homeland security and law enforcement agencies, including 51 to the Border Guards, 25 to the Police and two to the Prison Authority.


Plasan Sandcat Recce Version, Mounted with ELIOS Observation System

Three versions of the SandCat are shown here, an open special-operations patrol vehicle, a highly protected patrol version for border security and a police special forces version. The reconnaissance and patrol vehicle is equipped with a new electro-optical observation system developed by Eldor Communications Technologies. The system, dubbed ELiOS V.M.O.S. comprises a thermal imager, utilizing Opgal R25 thermal cameras with fixed, dual FOV or continuous zoom, a day camera with up to 25-1100 mm telephoto lens, both mounted on a unique pan / tilt payload mounted on a folding, telescopic mast that can rapidly elevate to a height of 90 cm, 1.40 m or up to 3 meters, using electro-hydraulic lift. When the telescopic mast is maintained in the tilted position, the payloads can be operated on the move.

Copyright © 2011 Defense Update. All Rights Reserved.

buglerbilly
28-06-11, 04:12 PM
Another Plasan SANDCAT, this one the so-called, SpecOps version.....................


Plasan Sandcat Spec-Ops Version. Photo: Noam Eshel, Defense-Update

buglerbilly
30-06-11, 01:08 AM
Second Life For Humvees

Jun 29, 2011

By Paul McLeary
Washington



The U.S. Army’s wheeled tactical and ground combat vehicle fleet is an embarrassment of riches. There is the iconic HMMWV—the High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle, or Humvee—up-armored Humvees, Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected (MRAP) vehicles, MRAP All-Terrain Vehicles (M-ATV), Stryker armored fighting vehicles, Bradley fighting vehicles and various armored security vehicles.

By the end of the decade the service plans to add two wheeled vehicles to the mix: the Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) and the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV), and spend hundreds of millions rebuilding—the Army refers to it as a “recap”—at least 60,000 Humvees from the frame up. This will be accomplished simultaneously with the culling of 15% of its 260,000 trucks by fiscal 2017, Army planning documents say. This would reduce the yearly tactical wheeled vehicle bill to $2.5 billion from $4.4 billion. It’s a complicated scenario compounded by the uncertain future of the GCV and JLTV, platforms that face technology hurdles as well as skepticism over their utility.

The Army has been fighting to start the HMMWV recap program for some time, but was blocked by Congress in 2010 from redirecting money to the initiative from funds set aside to buy Humvees. The plan the Army unveiled in its fiscal 2012 budget for upcoming years calls for recapping some 3,000 up-armored Humvees a year starting in fiscal 2013, with the goal of eventually upgrading more than 68,000 vehicles. It is requesting $161 million in fiscal 2012 for the program, a number that is slated to stay steady through fiscal 2016.

In April, the Army released its second request for information (RFI) for armoring, upgrading and refitting 60,000 up-armored HMMWVs from its fleet of 150,000 AM General-made vehicles. In the document, the Army said it is thinking bigger, with “the total potential quantity over the next 20 years [of] approximately 100,000 vehicles.” The program’s protection and mobility goals push the envelope of the possible in vehicle design, demanding near-MRAP levels of protection, while giving the vehicle back its original mobility and decreasing the weight of the current up-armored version. Mike Ivy, senior vice president and general manager for Army programs at truck maker Oshkosh Corp., which is bidding on the work, admits that the requirements are “challenging us . . . but I suspect all of industry is challenged” in trying to find the right mix of capabilities to meet the Army’s needs.

Chris Berman, owner of Granite Tactical, which has teamed with Textron on a recap bid, says that while his design is extremely maneuverable, the weight difference between the original 7,500-lb. Humvee and the recap, which will be 13,000-16,000 lb., is too great. “You’re never going to get [the new weight] of a kitted vehicle to go the same place that you’re going to get a 7,000-lb. vehicle going,” he says.

Still, Oshkosh and Textron/Granite, along with competitors AM General and BAE Systems, are giving it a shot.

Setting its recap price limit at $180,000 per vehicle, the Army is planning on spending more than three times what an unarmored Humvee costs to purchase. The payoff comes in the extra decades the program buys—the service projects using the upgraded vehicles well past 2030.

It hasn’t been an easy road for the Humvee. Sent to Iraq and Afghanistan a decade ago with thin-skin armor, the vehicles were chewed up by roadside bombs and rocket-propelled grenades, necessitating an on-the-fly up-armoring program that added weight while decreasing performance and maneuverability, stressing the suspension system almost to its breaking point and increasing fuel consumption.

It won’t be cheap to recap tens of thousands of vehicles. But the JLTV program, which is pegged as the replacement for up to 50,000 Humvees, is expected to cost at least $300,000 per vehicle, making the recap much less expensive. A 2010 Government Accountability Office report crunched numbers and came up with estimates. The base system cost for the M-ATV is $445,000, $186,000 for an up-armored HMMWV and $306,000–332,000 for the JLTV. (In fact, a Rand Corp. study released in April warned that the price for the JLTV could top $400,000.)

These costs may change, depending on the number of vehicles involved and the length and size of the contracts awarded. Col. David Bassett, the Army’s project manager for tactical vehicles, says the Humvee recap is going to be a long-term project that will continuously come up for competition. “The recap is not a forever program,” he told an industry audience at a tactical vehicles summit in Washington in April. The Army wants to re-compete the contract every five years, he added, warning industry members in the audience that “you need to be on your game.”

It’s not only the Army that wants to overhaul its HMMWV fleet. In March, the Marine Corps submitted its initial plan for a Humvee recap program to the Senate Armed Services Committee, following up on a request last year. The committee’s fiscal 2010 report confirmed its support for “the Army and Marine Corps plans to initiate a selective HMMWV recapitalization program that prudently resets, rebuilds and extends the life” of the vehicles.

At the same time as it submitted its analysis to the Senate, the Marine Corps released an RFI to industry, which is expected to be followed by a formal request for proposals, perhaps this month.

Like the Army, the Marines Corps has been trying to upgrade its Humvee fleet for years, with little success. An attempt to install Frag Kit 4 armor to the vehicle’s underbelly failed in 2007, followed by another disappointment in 2010 when it scuttled a program to put new armored capsules on the vehicles. An initiative the service was exploring with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency for a new type of armor also fell through. The latest plan is to open the program to industry competition for a recap of 3,400 vehicles, with the requirement that they be capable of the same sea and air transport as the current fleet.

Ivy says Oshkosh is throwing its hat in the ring for the Army and Marine programs because it is anxious to establish a presence in the light vehicle market, as it has in the medium and heavy markets with, respectively, the M-ATV and the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck. The company has built one prototype for the Army, and for the Marine Corps has taken a standard Humvee and installed a version of its TAK-4 suspension used on the M-ATV in Afghanistan. The service has put “some test miles on it,” he adds.

For now, industry is waiting to see if the Army and Marines come together on the project instead of working on separate recap programs. A joint program would entail concessions from both services on weight, survivability and perhaps mobility. That said, a joint program would be more cost-effective by providing economies of scale.

In a meeting with reporters in May, Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Peter Chiarelli spoke to the issue. Given President Barack Obama’s request for $400 billion in defense budget cuts in coming years, “the services are working together to look at programs, redundancies and duplications,” he said. While redundancies aren’t always a bad thing, Chiarelli added, the Pentagon needs to “take a look across the services to see if we have duplications, and if we can play to the strength of one service.” In fact, the services have already come together in a series of what one industry official calls “technology summits” to hammer out common requirements.

One team that says it’s ready to go is Textron and Granite Tactical, which placed a recap test model with the Marines in 2009, and is putting around 100-200 mi./per day on its own test vehicles, according to Berman, a former Navy SEAL who has been working to armor the Humvee since his experiences in Iraq in 2004. “We had a recap solution three years ago,” he says, adding “we’re production-ready.” Berman says the team exceeded JLTV-level protection and matched MRAP Level 1 protection in Marine Corps tests and its own independent testing, all while staying several hundred pounds lighter than a current up-armored Humvee.

A Rand study earlier this year found that the Humvee’s quarter century of service, multiple versions and years at war have thrown the fleet “out of balance in several areas.” The Army National Guard, for example, has a higher percentage of up-armored Humvees than the Army “despite having fewer requirements.” However, the National Guard’s “overall level of modernization trails both the active component and U.S. Army Reserve because of its lower level of modernized unarmored HMMWVs.”

It’s an imbalance that will likely take lots of money, and decades, to undo.

Photo: US Navy

buglerbilly
05-07-11, 01:24 PM
Contract on 39 Armored Vehicles DINGO in the Patrol and Security Version Concluded

(Source: German Defense Procurement Agency, BWB; issued June 21, 2011)



On 13 April 2011 the contract on the delivery of a total of 39 Armored C2 and Functional Vehicles Class 3 “DINGO 2 GE A3.3“ with Krauss-Maffei Wegmann was concluded at the Bundesamt für Wehrtechnik und Beschaffung (BWB). The document was signed by Reinhard Schütte, Vice-President of the BWB, and Jürgen Weber, CEO of Krauss-Maffei Wegmann.

The Armored C2 and Functional Vehicle version of the DINGO procured under this contract offers a very high degree of protection and is used to guard convoys and patrols. For this purpose it is equipped with a remote-controlled light weapon station type FLW 100 or FLW 200 that can be remotely operated for self-defense from inside the armored compartment at any time. Due to a higher maximum gross weight, the available payload has increased as well. With regard to the outside appearance, the current “DINGO 2 GE A3.3” differs from its predecessors by the new hardtop cover over the rear cargo bed replacing the canvas cover.

The vehicles in the Patrol and Security version will be handed over as part of the Urgent Operational Requirement (UOR) scheme until November 2011 and will be available to the soldiers in theaters soon afterwards. Several configuration baselines of the DINGO 2 GE (DINGO 2 GE A1/A2/A2.3) have been in service since 2007. The project is managed by team U4.1 of the BWB. The DINGO 2 is the vehicle with the highest mobility, the biggest payload and the best protection of its class. (ends)

BWB Has Signed a Contract for 76 Protected Vehicles “ENOK” in the “Military Police Operational Vehicle” Variant

(Source: German Defense Procurement Agency, BWB; issued June 21, 2011)



On 13 April 2011, a contract on the delivery of a total of 76 protected command and operations vehicles, Class 1 mobile “ENOK” (manufacturer designation LAPV 5.4) was concluded between the Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement (BWB) and the Daimler AG.

Mr Reinhard Schütte, Vice President of the Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement (BWB), and Mr Hans-Joachim Bayer, head of sales of the division authorities and special-purpose vehicles of Mercedes-Benz Germany, signed the contract in the presence of representatives of BWB project group U4 and BWB project service branch U2.

Since February/March this year, vehicles of the type “ENOK” have been used on operational deployments. In comparison to the vehicle with special protection kit “WOLF SSA” which is effectively the same size class and also used on operational deployments, the “ENOK” features, among other things, significantly improved protection in the field of ballistics and against mines and improvised explosive devices (IED).

The vehicles procured under this contract will be the military police vehicle variant, to be supplied by the year 2013. Important subcontractors for vehicle manufacture will be the companies Armoured Car Systems GmbH in Aichach as manufacturer of the protective equipment and Kissling Service GmbH in Koblenz providing the integration work of command and control, communication and additional equipment.

In its role as military police operational vehicle, the “ENOK” will, among other things, provide for the protected transport of national and multinational commanders or political decision-makers in the country of deployment. The “ENOK” will use its advantages as a highly mobile, quick and protected vehicle, particularly in areas which are out of reach for larger vehicles as a result of terrain and structural conditions.

-ends-

buglerbilly
07-07-11, 01:36 PM
Pentagon Contract Announcement

(Source: U.S Department of Defense; issued July 6, 2011)

First significant Overseas contract..........???

Oshkosh Corporation, Oshkosh, Wis., was awarded a $27,115,701 firm-fixed-price contract.

The award will provide for the modification of an existing contract to procure 50 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected All-Terrain vehicles, to include basic issue items and kits, in support of Foreign Military Sales to United Arab Emirates.

Work will be performed in Oshkosh, Wis., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2011. One bid was solicited, with one bid received.

The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-D-0111).

-ends-

buglerbilly
12-07-11, 04:03 PM
LMT to deliver armoured cabs to German Army



08:19 GMT, July 12, 2011

Pretoria-based Land Mobility Technologies (LMT) will next week start delivering armoured cabs to Mercedes Benz Special Trucks in Germany for fitting to a undisclosed number of Actros heavy recovery vehicles ordered for immediate use by German troops in Afghanistan.

The cabs are being manufactured by LMT at its Waltloo factory. The company says it received the contract in March 2011. Mercedes Benz, announcing the order in May, said the supply of the vehicles “will substantially enlarge the capabilities of the Bundeswehr.”

The companies say the vehicles will be of the same configuration and with the same high level of protection as the 120 successfully operated by the Canadian Forces in Afghanistan since March 2008.

“The vehicles will ensure the best available protection in wheeled logistics vehicles for the German soldiers in operation, Mercedes Benz said in its may statement. “With the heavily-armoured Actros 4151 AK 8x8, Mercedes-Benz is setting new standards in special-purpose logistics vehicles. The Actros provides Level 4 ballistic protection and Level 4b mine protection according to STANAG 4569. Thanks to its extremely effective armour against blasts and shrapnel, the Actros is also setting standards when it comes to protection against IED's and car bombs.

“The systems of the heavily-armoured Actros 4151 AK 8x8 have been further optimised on the basis of many years of experience. Thanks to their excellent cab protection, high-performance chassis and tried-and-tested bodies, the vehicles are able to offer a deployment availability of over 95%.”

Mercedes Benz adds the armoured cab can be tilted forward so as to guarantee access to the engine compartment, which is also armoured. A new seating system with 5-point seat belts provides the optimum basis for protecting the occupants against attack, including from the side. At the same time the seats offer both secure support when driving off-road as well as good freedom of movement. A high-performance air conditioning system helps to ensure optimum temperatures are maintained, even in extreme climatic conditions.

A particular challenge faced by heavy recovery vehicles is the distribution of axle loads in all deployment situations - from heavy-duty recovery applications through to driving when empty. While the weight of the armoured cab lies across the front axles only, in recovery situations the weight of the raised, towed vehicle places a load on the rear axles which can act like a huge lever. The Actros 4151 AK 8x8 Recovery vehicle, however, has been designed in such a way as to ensure a substantially uniform axle load distribution and also enable safe handling in both heavy-duty recovery situations and also when driving unladen, the company says.

The protected Special Vehicle has a weight of 33.500 kg, a length of 10.530 mm, a width of 2.800 mm and a height of 3.400 mm. The wheelbase of the Mercedes-Benz Actros 8x8 is 5.580 mm. The BlueTec 5-V8-engine of the type OM 502 LA has a power of 375 kW/ 510 hp.

The recovery technology consists of the wreckerbody made bei Empl, three Rotzler-winches and a Hiab-front-crane. The Rotzler-winches have a max. tractive power of 25 to with a cable-length of 100 m. The Hiab-crane has a lifting capacity of 7.500 kg with 2,60 m. The arm of the Empl-wrecker has a lifting height of 5m and a lifting capacity of 16 metric tons. The wrecker capacity while driving is more than 12mt.

(Courtesy by defenceWeb; First published at http://goo.gl/azbbx)

geof
14-07-11, 01:29 PM
THE SAS Regiment will finally receive 31 new "Nary" patrol vehicles bought at a cost of $80 million after delivery to the army this month - more than three years late.

"Army is now considering how to use the vehicles," a well-placed source said.

The world's most expensive four-man army vehicle was named in honour of SAS Warrant Officer and vehicle specialist David Nary, who died in a training accident in Kuwait in 2005. Built by British firm Supacat they are known as Jackals with the UK forces who have been using them since 2009.

The Australian variant has been dogged by technical problems including systems integration, payload, suspension and armour issues and will be 42 months behind schedule when it enters service in Afghanistan this year. Defence said: "There have been a number of integration issues.

"These include modification of the vehicle to carry a larger payload, integration of the command and control communications system and vehicle survivability enhancement. These issues have now been addressed and the project will deliver a very capable and networked vehicle fleet to Australian Special Forces."


Its weight was boosted by 1000kg of steel armour to almost 10 tonnes - making it too heavy to drive into the Army Chinook helicopters used to carry patrol vehicles all over Afghanistan and Iraq.

The Nary is based on the Supacat HMT 400 4 X 4 and 6 X 6 family of vehicles and it can be fitted with an "optional" mine blast and ballistic protection kit and a variety of mission hampers, weapons, communications, surveillance and protection equipment.

It is armed with two machine guns and a grenade launcher, is powered by a 6.7 litre Cummins engine and is fitted with independent air operated suspension allowing for variable ride height.

In 2006, then army chief Lieutenant General Peter Leahy said the new vehicles would provide greater payload with a stronger drive-train, transmission and components and an enhanced suite of equipment for operators.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/indepth/sas-wheels-of-war-new-armoured-carriers-ready-for-service-in-afghanistan/story-e6frewp9-1226094208637

Redcoat
14-07-11, 04:49 PM
classic case of the best being the enemy of the good enough

Toms love the Jackals whilst not perfect they have been a huge success they carry a great amount of kit whilst offering a good level of protection and good mobility It must have taken some really detemined morons to take a successful functioning l piece of kit and turn it into something "dogged by technical problems"

buglerbilly
15-07-11, 02:24 AM
Personally I like this line.............."Army is now considering how to use the vehicles," a well-placed source said.

Really? Well I'll be damned...................

geof
15-07-11, 04:24 AM
.. I have to say that I am a bit confused as to why these OTS vehicles would have "intergration issues" that would delay there delivery by 42 months, and what they might be .. lets see mmm .. I know , the speedo was in mph and not kph ....

buglerbilly
15-07-11, 02:47 PM
Oshkosh Defense to Supply 400 Additional M-ATVs to U.S. Forces


Oshkosh Defense-built M-ATVs are deployed to Afghanistan in a C-17 Globemaster III.

15:36 GMT, July 14, 2011 OSHKOSH, WI | Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, will build and deliver an additional 400 MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) base variants with integrated underbody protection following an order from the U.S. Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command (LCMC). This delivery order was announced by the Department of Defense on June 30. Oshkosh has received orders to deliver more than 8,700 M-ATVs of which more than 8,000 life-saving M-ATVs have been delivered for operations in Afghanistan. Oshkosh also received an order to continue Field Service Representative (FSR) support for the M-ATV in theater.

“The battle-proven Oshkosh M-ATV is designed and built to give troops the best combination of protection and mobility on the battlefield,” said Ken Juergens, vice president and general manager of Joint Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “As we provide M-ATVs, we also ensure they are always battle-ready with support from our factory-trained FSRs, who use their expertise to help sustain vehicles in and out of theater, as well as provide technical guidance and training for troops.”

The M-ATV is designed to provide exceptional protection and superior mobility for operations on unimproved road networks and rugged off-road terrain in places like Afghanistan. The M-ATV bolt-on design permits in-theater installation of the latest armor technology to meet mission demands and the ever-changing and increasing threats in theater. The vehicle uses the Oshkosh TAK-4 independent suspension system to provide added flexibility, allowing the M-ATV to take on additional bolt-on armor and protection kits while maintaining a payload of up to 4,000 pounds. The M-ATV family of vehicles also includes the Special Forces Vehicle (SFV), Multi-Mission Vehicle (MMV), tactical ambulance and 2.5 ton cargo vehicle to deliver protected mobility for a wide array of operations in unforgiving terrain.

Factory-trained Oshkosh FSRs go where they are needed worldwide, including in-theater, and provide a direct link to the company and its parts network. FSRs provide vehicle-specific expertise to not only maintain vehicles, but also to provide technical guidance and help train troops so militaries can perform more vehicle service in-house.

The M-ATV order is valued at more than $207 million. Vehicle deliveries are expected to begin in October and be completed by November. To date, the FSR order is valued at more than $31 million and will continue the support of more than 90 FSRs in theater through March 2012.

buglerbilly
16-07-11, 09:56 AM
Pics of the Nary's.................





Significant differences between the two pics...............???

Milne Bay
22-07-11, 06:46 AM
800th Bushmaster rolls off production line

22 Jul 2011

The 800th Bushmaster to roll off the Bendigo production line has been officially handed over to the Government.

The handover ceremony at Thales Australia’s Bendigo facility was attended by Minister for Defence Stephen Smith, Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare; Steve Gibbons MP, Federal Member for Bendigo; plus a host of representatives from Bushmaster suppliers and industry associations.

The vehicle is an Australian success story, helping save troops’ lives on operations and enabling successful completion of missions in even the most hostile environments.

Chris Jenkins, Thales Australia’s CEO, said the production milestone achieved by the

Bushmaster was the result of Australian ingenuity and manufacturing expertise.

“Our Bendigo facility is unique, not only because it is the home of such an innovative vehicle, but also because we have the engineering and manufacturing skills to evolve the vehicle to meet new threats on the battlefield.

“This local expertise, and that of all the suppliers to the program – the vast majority of which are Australian – gives the Australian Defence Force a significant resource it can use to adapt the vehicle to its own unique needs.

“In addition, new Bushmaster variants such as the Single Cab Utility, as well as new vehicles such as the Hawkei, have only been possible because of the proven capability found in our Bendigo facility.

“The recent Commonwealth order for 101 new Bushmasters has given the Bendigo facility a great boost, and we are vigorously pursuing ongoing opportunities for the Single Cab under Land 121 Phase 3 and the Hawkei under Land 121 Phase 4, as well as export orders.”
Ref:
http://www.australiandefence.com.au/news/800th-bushmaster-rolls-off-production-line

Mercator
23-07-11, 02:09 AM
here we go...


Brisbane Times:

Army tender ambushed

Mark Hawthorne and Rafael Epstein
July 23, 2011.

THE Gillard government has been accused of interfering in a Defence tender process to buy the next generation of army trucks, pushing a generous portion of the multibillion-dollar contract to the Victorian-built Bushmaster.

Defence and industry insiders have told The Saturday Age the government has tried to circumvent recommendations from the Defence Materiel Organisation, which favoured a cheaper armoured truck made by German company Rheinmetall MAN. It beat both Mercedes-Benz and the modified Bushmaster Ute, which is made in Bendigo by French company Thales, in the Defence tender.

The Bushmaster Ute not only came last in trials, but costs up to three times as much as its rivals. It is more expensive to service and rolled twice in initial testing due to a high centre of gravity.

Advertisement: Story continues below

Despite this, a source in the DMO told The Saturday Age a message came back from the government after the German company topped the tender process: ''Any option that doesn't include Thales is no option.''

Another insider said: ''The government wanted to keep Bendigo open and it would close if we didn't give them some work.'' They said the government was trying to influence the final departmental decision, worth as much as $1.7 billion.


While the DMO recommended Rheinmetall MAN, the government has yet to make a decision on the tender. The department denied being asked to include Thales as a successful tenderer. It said the final decision would rest on ''the needs of our soldiers and best value for money''.

The delayed project for 2700 medium and heavyweight trucks, some of which could be used in Afghanistan, includes 1500 vehicles with substantial armoured protection.

Thales has bid to supply 900 of its new Bushmaster Utes - worth more than $500 million - to replace the army's ageing fleet of Unimog trucks.

Privately, a number of parties have raised concerns about political interference in the tender.

In March, Mercedes-Benz Australian president Hans Tempel wrote to Defence Minister Stephen Smith to express concerns about ''the overall process of selecting a final tenderer … and whether undisclosed factors will play a role''.

The letter, which has been obtained by The Saturday Age, was written after Labor's Bendigo MP Steve Gibbons stated publicly that the government could reverse the DMO's final decision. The MP told the ABC that while the DMO might ''overlook Bushmaster, we may be able to overturn that … because ultimately it will be a government decision''.

Mr Gibbons has been a vocal campaigner for Bushmaster, which has cut 100 jobs in his constituency in the past year. In his reply to Mr Tempel, Mr Smith warned Mercedes-Benz ''a letter has recently been sent to all tenderers … reminding them of their obligations regarding public announcements and communications''.

The department has reminded all three tenderers of their obligation not to speak to journalists.

The Saturday Age believes there are further concerns the government intervened in a separate contract awarded to Thales in May, when 101 Bushmaster troop carriers were purchased for $130 million, despite the army needing less than half as many to replace damaged vehicles. That contract will keep the Bendigo production line open for at least another year.

Sources say the army originally requested 31 vehicles, but Defence increased its request to 61. The final purchase of 101 vehicles is seen by insiders as excessive, and they claim there are dozens of Bushmasters sitting unused in storage.

The department says ''there are no unused [deployable] Bushmasters in storage''.

However, aerial pictures taken last month show 89 Bushmasters sitting on Defence land in Brisbane (and there were 61 pictured there last year).

A DMO source said: ''This is protectionism. We are trading off the safety of soldiers and we are trading off capability for an Australian-made option.''

This week, Mr Smith said he would make no decision on the contract until after he received a recommendation from the department. Speaking at Thales's Bendigo plant he said: ''We will await Defence advice and then we'll make a judgment.''

The department makes a recommendation based on the technical merits of each manufacturer, but before a formal submission is made it must consider what is known as ''Whole of Commonwealth requirements'' for army vehicles.

Defence and contractor sources say this is ''industry policy being run out of Defence''.

''What annoys me is the man on the ground will miss out [because] the government is directly intervening,'' said a source involved with testing the trucks.

A test driver said: ''My vested interest is as a soldier on the ground who, in the end, will have to use the vehicle.''

''That vehicle [Bushmaster Ute] doesn't meet the tender specifications. You can't load it above the cab height … and there are the centre of gravity issues. Really, it's not a vehicle we can use, and the army doesn't want it.''

The new Bushmaster utility had initial testing problems, suffering from potentially fatal rollovers and unacceptable vibration in the driver's cabin. Some sources say these issues are still outstanding, while others insist they were fixed.

One source said that while all three vehicles had minor weaknesses, they met the contract requirements and all were better than the current fleet in Afghanistan.

geof
23-07-11, 05:26 AM
.. the only Bushmaster "ute" they should be looking at is the twin cab variant ... perfect as a gun tractor IMO .. lets hope they just move things along now and make the announcement that MAN trucks are comming our way ..

tiddles
25-07-11, 02:32 AM
Why dont one of the people in the jeep just drive the thing.
Tiddles


Air Force Special Forces seek stealth robot jeep It has to carry two fighters, gear over rough terrain under cover of darkness


Soldiers with Special Operations Task Force-South prepare to load an all-terrain vehicle onto a CH-47 Chinook helicopter in preparation for a rapid offload during operations Oct. 1, in the Maruf district, Kandahar province, Afghanistan.InnovationNewsDaily.com
updated 7/22/2011 3:35:07 PM ET 2011-07-22T19:35:07
-Self-driving cars may already seem like a dubious idea to most drivers, but the U.S. Air Force wants to raise the stakes. U.S. Special Forces soldiers may soon trust their lives to a stealth robot jeep that can autonomously carry them to their target and back, through mountainous terrain under the cover of nightfall, without alerting enemy patrols.

The robotic vehicle must have the ability to carry two warfighters and up to 700 pounds of gear over more than 18 miles of rugged terrain, according to the request for information issued by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). And it must be capable of navigating enemy territory stealthily, day or night, under any weather conditions.

"The mission will be executed under the cover of night and the system must be able to work autonomously with only minimal inputs from the warfighters," says the AFRL. "The hostile area does not have radar, but they do have patrols who will respond to visual and audible cues if they detect something out of the ordinary."

The AFRL also requested that the robotic vehicle must fit within the cargo hold of a CV-22 Osprey, the tilt-rotor aircraft that carries Marines around Afghanistan and ferried Osama bin Laden's body out of Pakistan.

Plenty of academic and private teams have developed robotic vehicles capable of some autonomous driving, either on their own or as part of DARPA's Grand Challenge. Google has even tested its self-driving vehicles in the San Francisco Bay Area. But driving on paved roads is a far cry from navigating rough terrain and perhaps having the capability to actively avoid possible enemies.

Still, the Air Force lab has wisely sought out "new ideas from hobbyists, enthusiasts, teams and organizations that have not typically done business with the government in the past."

The recent notice precedes an upcoming request for proposals that would award $200,000 to each of up to five teams for stealthy design concepts. Each team would eventually have the chance to compete for a $2 million contract to build a prototype of their dream robotic jeep.

Redcoat
25-07-11, 04:52 PM
If it has got 2 blokes on board - why cant one of them drive it ? or are we trying to maximise costs here

buglerbilly
26-07-11, 01:54 AM
Blast Chimney Shows Promise, Questions Remain

By KATE BRANNEN

Published: 22 Jul 2011 19:36

This technology applies to all armoured vehicles of ANY type...............

Since its veiled debut at an annual U.S. Army conference last year, there has been little news of the structural blast chimney, a potentially groundbreaking technology that promises to protect Humvees and other military vehicles from roadside bombs.


A blast from an IED-like explosive envelops a Humvee equipped with a "chimney" structure intended to protect vehicle passengers. The U.S. Test Center has put the chimney through a number of such blast tests. (DARPA)

Now, new information is emerging, including blast test results from the Army's Test Center in Aberdeen, Md., and new data from the Marine Corps on the vehicle's durability in difficult terrain. The test results paint a complicated picture of a promising technology that still has to work out some kinks. And until there is more data, it remains unclear how much the chimney contributes to the safety of the people inside.

Back in October, those invited to an off-site art gallery near the Washington Convention Center could view a blast-tested Humvee and learn of its ability to vent explosive energy up through a blast channel that ran through the center of it.

News of the chimney immediately drew questions from skeptics. There were whispers that Hardwire, the company behind the chimney, and its teammate on the project, Humvee-maker AM General, had oversold the technology's potential.

Others wanted to know how a blast channel running straight up through the interior of a Humvee affected the space and visibility for the soldiers inside.

As the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Army and the Marine Corps proceeded to blast-test the vehicles in Aberdeen, defense officials talked about the technology's potential in congressional testimony and in meetings with reporters.

"Visually, it looks very, very promising," Army Secretary John McHugh told lawmakers March 16.

He said he'd watched classified videos in Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey's office of the vehicles being blown up.

Until now, no one outside the program has learned what "very promising" means.

M-ATV Protection, Half The Weight

While the tests' results remain classified, DARPA officials say the blasts indicate a Humvee equipped with the structural blast chimney provides the mandatory survivability level required of an M-ATV, the lightest version of the military's mine-resistant ambush-protected (MRAP) vehicles. And it does so at almost half the weight.

The gross weight of the Humvees being tested is 16,300 pounds. An M-ATV weighs roughly 30,000 pounds, while the average MRAP weighs 40,000 pounds.

"The data to date indicates that the occupant survivability of this vehicle is comparable to the M-ATV," said Leo Christodoulou, who directs DARPA's Defense Sciences Office.

There have been 11 survivability tests to date, and eight have been under a joint DARPA-Marine Corps-Army program. The Army Test Center has conducted all of the tests.

Five more survivability tests are scheduled before the end of the summer, Christodoulou said.

A DARPA chart prepared earlier in the year for Congress shows that the goal is to achieve MRAP-like survivability at less than half the weight. The companies behind the effort remain confident that such results will be achieved in upcoming tests.

The structural blast chimney holds a lot of promise for even bigger explosions, according to AM General CEO Charles Hall. He said the structural blast chimney could provide the survivability of vehicles two to three times its weight.

Chris Yunker, who leads the vehicle requirements team at the Marine Corps Combat Development Command, said the service is watching the blast testing closely.

"When they do the blast testing on this rigid cabin we're seeing pretty good results," Yunker said. "That really caught our attention and we said, 'This is a good design; let's keep looking at it.'"

Despite its moniker, there is much more to the new vehicle design than the chimney.

Hardwire CEO George Tunis explained that all of the components working together keep the vehicle intact, on the ground and its occupants safe.

The clutter inside the vehicle has been cleaned up, with new racks designed to hold gear and ammo. Hardwire picked seats designed by Jankel, which Tunis described as the best blast-mitigating seat on the market.

Hardwire has also redesigned the way the Gunner Protection Kit responds during a blast event, greatly reducing the blast overpressure, he said.

The floor has also been redesigned to absorb as much blast energy as possible, Tunis said.

Finally, there is the chimney, which not only creates a hollow space through the vehicle but a very rigid cab structure that can withstand big explosions. The chimney also connects the ceiling to the floor, which reinforces the floor's strength, Tunis said.

But what once seemed like the key feature - the hollow blast channel - might only play a small role in the vehicle's protection.

Christodoulou said DARPA is still running tests and simulations that will help decouple the contributions of the various components. For the chimney, "the jury is still out," he said.

First and foremost, the chimney provides structural rigidity to the cabin, Yunker said. "There's a little bit of debate on whether there is any venting effect of that chimney."

The numbers he's seen show it may contribute 3 to 7 percent in the decrease of the vehicle's acceleration.

"I have the luxury of being a combat developer," he said, "and I tell people, 'I don't care if it's bubble gum on the window that makes the thing work.' If it works, we're interested in it."

He said that of the three ways that Marines and soldiers die in roadside bomb attacks, the chimney may be protecting against two.

The chimney does not mitigate a bomb's energy impulse, which still hits the vehicle's underbody, but it may help decrease acceleration from overpressure, according to Yunker.

"It looks to me like there's some venting, because you see smoke and dirt coming out of that chimney," he said.

Troops are also killed by fragmentation and debris, and some of that appears to be going through the chimney as well, he said.

"No matter what the percentage, if it reduces injury by any percent it's worth it," Tunis said.

System's Flaws

While DARPA continues to investigate the question of the chimney, the Marines are focusing on the Humvee's structural durability after thousands of miles of driving.

"What we're seeing in the structural blast chimney design is similar to a problem we're seeing in other designs," Yunker said. The rigid cabin structure is putting pressure on the Humvee's frame and this is leading to fatigue problems.

"You can drive it a few thousand miles and you'll have some structural damage and pretty quick you'll have some real component failures, so our next step is to focus now on the automotive issues," he said. "It's kind of like we're looking at a house, but we've got a foundation problem."

The Army and the Marine Corps also have to consider cost. The question becomes how much does it cost to solve the problem versus buying new vehicles.

Meanwhile, both services will have other candidates to consider.

"Honestly, we're seeing other designs in that same weight class that are making M-ATV-level protection," Yunker said.

AM General even has another potential offer for the Army and Marine Corps' upcoming Humvee recapitalization programs.

After canvassing industry a few years ago, AM General decided to throw its luck and investment behind the Hardwire solution and a different one from Israeli armor-maker Plasan.

"This [chimney] program is not supposed to be a point solution for anything; it's supposed to inform us to make the next vehicle decisions," Christodoulou said.

While questions about the chimney remain, officials agree that people should let the data speak for itself.

"Let's follow the data. Let's continue to do experimentation and see where the data and the facts take us," Yunker said.

buglerbilly
28-07-11, 02:25 AM
U.K. Firm Adapting Off-Road Wildcat for Military

By ANDREW CHUTER

Published: 27 Jul 2011 12:08

LONDON - A rally car turned military vehicle that's capable of going from 0 to 60 mph in less than five seconds is set to be launched by British company Supacat.


Supacat took a car orginially designed for the Paris-Dakar Rally and turned it into a military scout vehicle. (Supacat)

The high-speed, high-mobility Wildcat off-road machine, built by motorsport specialist QT Services, is being adapted for military duties by Supacat, with special forces, border patrol, rapid intervention and other roles in mind.

With a top speed of around 110 mph, the rally version of the Wildcat has performed with distinction in rough-terrain endurance events in Africa and Latin America in recent years.

Now Supacat, best known for its Jackal vehicles used by the British Army in Afghanistan, says it is militarizing the rally machine to fill a gap between small, low-cost, high-mobility platforms such as quad bikes and much heavier vehicles.

Jamie Clarke, Supacet's sales and marketing manager, said the two-seat vehicle is likely to be priced at about 250,000 pounds ($409,000), including the fitting of a Kongsberg remote weapons station.

Clarke said he expects the Middle East to be a prime market for a 2,580-kilogram gross weight machine, which has a range in its sports configuration of 2,000 kilometers.

The Supacat vehicle is being officially launched at the Defence Systems & Equipment International show here in September.

Clarke said his company already extensively uses motorsport suppliers, but "this is the first time we've taken an entire platform from the racing sector and marketed it into defense."

The executive said Supacat is considering lightweight armor, sensor and weapon solutions in a program aimed at making the military Wildcat available in early 2012.

"As military vehicles have become heavier and more expensive due to increased protection requirements, we perceive there is a gap in the market for a platform like Wildcat. ... It's on a different level in terms of performance and durability," Clarke said.



Specification: http://www.supacat.com/files/pdf/Supacat-Wildcat-specification.pdf

Video:

buglerbilly
28-07-11, 03:42 PM
Army Preparing to Produce JLTVs

(Source: US Army; issued July 27, 2011)


Source / copyright : US Army

ARLINGTON, Va. --- After refining requirements during a two-year Technology Development phase for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, Army developers are poised to conduct a full and open competition geared toward formal production, service officials said.

The JLTV will be a next-generation light vehicle designed to bring Soldiers an unprecedented blend of protection, payload and performance, said Tim Goddette, director of Sustainment Systems.

The TD phase for JLTV development, completed this past May, successfully demonstrated the vehicle's ability to meet a wide range of requirements, including fortified IED protections designed to withstand blast attacks, off-road mobility, variable ride height suspension, exportable power and essential C4ISR capabilities, Goddette said.

The 27-month TD phase included prototype vehicles from three teams of vendors: BAE-Navistar, Lockheed-BAE and General Tactical Vehicles (General Dynamics and AM General).

"The purpose of the TD phase was geared toward refining the requirements in order to demonstrate the JLTV's ability to meet the designated capability gaps," Goddette said. "The program has succeeded in identifying and proving out those areas of needed development - and now the Army is analyzing what trade-offs might be required in order to best pursue and acquisition strategy that both lowers costs and delivers this needed capability to Soldiers,"

The competitive prototyping and extensive testing pursued during the TD phase was designed to match technological capability with the vehicle's requirements and lower risk for an anticipated production phase, Goddette said.

"We demonstrated that every one of the requirements was achievable. We've learned that some trade-offs are necessary to pursue an overall strategy that best synchronizes requirements, resources, mature technologies and a cost-reducing acquisition strategy.

"We demonstrated not only that the requirements were achievable, but we gained valuable insight into the cost of each capability and effect that one capability might have on another. We've learned that some trade-offs are necessary to pursue an overall strategy that best synchronizes requirements, resources, mature technologies and a cost-reducing acquisition strategy," Goddette said.

Operating in today's more budget-constrained fiscal environment, Army developers are working on an approach to JLTV procurement that harnesses the best available technologies while minimizing costs and achieving efficiency in the process, he said.

One such approach includes the possibility of buying less add-on armor (B-kits) for the vehicles because not every JLTV will need the added protection and new, lightweight materials may likely become available in the future, Goddette said.

Due to its enhanced technological capabilities, the JLTV will be able to perform a wide range of missions and perform many roles Humvees are currently unable to do, Goddette said. At the same time, the Army has embarked upon a competitive Humvee recap program aimed at improving the survivability of the existing vehicle that is already in the Army inventory.

"The JLTV and Humvee-recap program are designed to complement one another as part of an integrated Light Tactical Vehicle strategy designed to best prepare our force for a range of anticipated future contingencies," Goddette said. "These two competitive efforts are also synchronized with one another to invest a limited amount of resources up front enabling a "try before we buy" approach and capitalize on the vast experience our industry partners have gained over that past five years."

With its off-road ability, blast-protections and on-board electronics, the JLTV will bring a new set of capabilities to the Army and Marines.

There are two different variants or categories of JLTV:

-- Combat Tactical Vehicle is a four-person general purpose vehicle with a curb weight of 13,000 pounds and the ability to carry 3,500 pounds of payload and 3,500 pounds of add-on armor.

-- Combat Support vehicle is a two-passenger utility vehicle with a short cab/open bed for hauling equipment or putting on shelters.


General Tactical Vehicles JLTV entrant


Lockheed-Martin JLTV entrant


BAE Systems JLTV entrant

-ends-

buglerbilly
29-07-11, 02:09 PM
SOF Looking for new vehicle — Jeep vs. Flyer

by Jack Murphy on July 29, 2011



The Special Operations community often moves in a circular motion when it comes to adopting and employing new weapons, equipment, and vehicles.

Take for instance the US Army’s bouncing from the 7.62 round, then forcing 5.56 down NATO’s throat, before now swinging back in the other direction with Rangers and Special Forces making good use of the 7.62 SCAR-H. Light infantry maneuver tactics grew out of the Vietnam War before the Army gradually moved towards heavy armored vehicles and burying soldiers under undue amounts of body armor.

Today, SOF units in Afghanistan are now moving back towards lighter combat loads and unarmored, but highly mobile, tactical vehicles.

Currently, Army Special Operations is seeking to identify a new Ground Mobility Vehicle to replace the Humvee. USASOC put out the word some time ago that it was looking for a SOF specific all-terrain vehicle that seated four troops to include the turret gunner.

At the moment Jeep and Flyer are the two front runners competing for the contract. Jeep has submitted it’s entry based on it’s new J8 platform. Initially having constructed a prototype Light Patrol Vehicle, Jeep responded to inputs from the SOF community to create a new truck to suit the requirements of the units involved.

In the beginning, one of the stipulations around this project was that the vehicle be compatible with the VTOL capable, V-22 Osprey. Finally, this requirement was given the chop in favor of seeking a platform specifically compatible with the MH-47 helicopter preferred by Army Special Operations teams. Jeep has reportedly accomplished this task, however it pushed the entire project back by six months.

Flyer meanwhile, appears to be somewhat behind the power curve, submitting it’s own entry into the fray with an engine that soldiers are finding to be overly complicated. Reports state that if the Flyer entry were to break down in the austere environments that SOF units operate in that the vehicle would have to be returned to the United States for repairs.

Pictures and additional details of these vehicles are not yet forthcoming, but we will be keeping an eye on this project for future developments.

Read more: http://kitup.military.com/2011/07/sof-looking-for-new-vehicle-jeep-vs-flyer.html#ixzz1TV1GiALt
Kit Up!

Mercator
30-07-11, 02:33 AM
Putting the brakes on Bushmaster bashing


Mark Hawthorne, The Age
July 30, 2011 .

Questioning over an army tender has led to a strident defence of the transport truck.

SUGGESTIONS that the Gillard government interfered in a $2.9 billion tender to supply the Australian Army with armoured transport trucks has ruffled feathers in Bendigo, where Thales builds the much-loved Bushmaster.

The Defence Materiel Organisation has been told to include the French company's new Bushmaster Ute in the mix - despite it coming last in testing, costing up to three times more than German-built rivals, and having a worrying propensity to tip over at speed.

You'd think those three strikes would rule out the new Bushmaster, despite the success of its troop-carrying predecessor. Not so - the pressure is on the DMO to spend $500 million on them.

Advertisement: Story continues below

Local Labor member Steve Gibbons was quick to attack The Saturday Age questioning interference in a supposedly independent, transparent and non-political tender process.

''There is a difference between alleged political interference and MPs' responsibilities to represent their communities,'' he wrote.

There are also, one might suggest, legally binding rules about a tender process - especially one that stipulates the DMO should buy the best vehicle at the best price.

Gibbons also defended the Bushmaster's performance, denying it had rollover issues.

''I understand there were no centre-of-gravity issues with the Bushmaster Ute as reported by The Age, but the problem was caused by steering and suspension geometry and braking configurations that have all been rectified.''

So the prototype was fine - apart from the steering, the braking and the suspension.

Gibbons wasn't the only one to defend the Bushy. Opposition defence spokesman David Johnston went on ABC Central Victoria local radio to also back Thales. ''Any sign of light that the Bushmaster is going to receive some government support is a positive thing,'' Johnston said.

Of course, the posturing by both Gibbons and Johnston to support Bendigo jobs could all be for nought.

SA premier Mike Rann has made a very lucrative offer to Thales to relocate its entire production facilities to his state - an offer the French company is taking seriously.


Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/business/putting-the-brakes-on-bushmaster-bashing-20110729-1i4a9.html#ixzz1TY22zaPx

buglerbilly
30-07-11, 03:17 AM
I've just had a read of the original Age article, a number of points if I may: -

1) Vehicles in storage doesn't really mean shit, there are always vehicles in storage and the numbers fluctuate according to User need and allocation. IF, and its a big "IF", they are unassigned, then get off yer arses and assign them! There are plenty of Army regiments that can make use of them.

2) The Ute cannot be loaded above the roof line? Jeez I didn't know whether to laugh or weep over this comment. Naive in its content as some loads, dimensionally, are going to be higher BUT with the weighty part of the load on the bottom. The fact that the packing case or container sticks above the roof line is irrelevant to any CofG discussions or problems. IF there is a load situation where the load CofG is high then I'd love to know what it is cos it doesn't make sense to any kind of Army scenario I can think of. Some of the commnetary smacks of the garbage pumped in the USA about the MRAP's where a Suspension reconfig has removed more or less all complaints.

3) Some of this "discussion" appears to wander around different categories of trucks, mixing heavy with medium. Bushmaster Ute has nothing to do with the former.

4) There is an evaluation process underway, which includes Technical and Capability evals. Ultimately its up to Government to decide what it buys based on these Evals and Recommnedations, and if they override any element then thats their concern, Army just has to live with the consequence.

5) Using these vehicles in places like Afghanistan which one would you want to be sitting in when travelling IED alley? My choice is clear......

buglerbilly
30-07-11, 03:47 AM
This is the Jankel-modified J8 Jeep for the SpecFor requirement noted above....................price in the high $30K's so VERY cheap compared to most anything else...............

buglerbilly
01-08-11, 05:28 AM
A bit more on this new Supacat vehicle.............

Supacat’s Introduces a Military Version of the Wildcat Race Car

by tamir_eshel | on July 31st, 2011



Supacat has transformed the Wildcat Rally Racer into a special purpose military vehicle optimized for special operations and quick reaction operations. The prototype displayed by the company also carried the new Thales / Kongsberg Super Light remotely operated weapon station. Photo: Supacatvehicle

Supacat have added a new, lightweight, super agile military variant of the Rally Raid proven Wildcat into its military, special purpose vehicle family. The new Wildcat offers a high performance, off road vehicle for special forces, border patrol, reconnaissance, rapid intervention and strike roles.

“Compared to other ‘Modified Off The Shelf’ vehicles, the Wildcat is on a different level in terms of performance and durability” said Jamie Clarke, Sales and Marketing Manager, Supacat. ”It has the race results to prove it can perform in the desert and other environments, it is light and agile yet big enough to carry the sub-systems required on operations. As military vehicles have become heavier and more expensive due to increased protection requirements, we perceive that there is a gap in the market for a platform like the Wildcat.

According to Supacat, the new vehicle is filling a significant gap that currently exists between lightweight and less expensive high mobility platforms such as quad bikes and the heavier, more specialist and well renowned Jackal. The company teamed with Wildcat Design Authority, QT Services, the developer of the vehicle to transform the race car into an affordable, off-road military variant of the Wildcat 500 DKR which was proved highly effective in off-road races such as the Paris-Dakar race. Beyond the prototype phase, Supacat will be responsible for militarizing the vehicle, including systems integration and volume production. As other Supacat specialized vehicles such as the Jackal and SPV400, the Wildcat will be offered with lightweight armor protection, weapons and communications systems, to meet specific requirements.


The military Wildcat prototype was displayed armed with Thales supplied version of the Kongsberg Super Light remotely operated weapon station, fitted with 600 rounds in the ready round bin. The weapon is controlled by a joystick or 'thumb controller' with the target viewed by daylight or night camera on the display inside the vehicle. Photo: Supacat,

According to Clarke, Supacat has a history of successfully using the motorsport industry to enhance its vehicles, for example, the Jackal has over 14 motorsport companies in its supply chain. However, the Wildcat represents a new level of integration of motorsport solutions for military use as it is the first time an entire platform is adapted into a military vehicle.

The Wildcat has a tubular space-frame chassis and state of the art suspension with an outstanding reputation for rugged reliability. With a Gross Vehicle Weight of 2580kg and size (3800mm x 1755mm) it is easily air portable. Maximum speed is 106 mph (170km/h) and range is 2000km. The Wildcat is available with specially developed air conditioning to greatly reduce crew fatigue. It also shares some parts with Land Rover so the logistic footprint is reduced for any military customer who already has Land Rovers in service. Supacat will be displaying a militarized variant of Wildcat at DSEi in September.



Uploaded by TheEngineerUK on Jul 29, 2011
Source and copyright: The Engineer http://www.theengineer.co.uk
The Engineer tests out a new high-mobility military vehicle from Supacat based on the Wildcat rally 4x4 built by Qt Services and employing a new weapons system from Thales.


2011 Defense Update

buglerbilly
01-08-11, 11:45 AM
Via Soldier Systems blog...........

SRTV from BC Customs

August 1st, 2011

Coming soon to a DA hit near you, Ground Mobility Vehicle System (ver 1.1) is SOCOM’s concept for a new truck to replace their HMMWV-based systems currently in service. Since the solicitation is expected to kick off in September, several companies have been showing their wares. However, one company has been flying under the radar yet delivering capability for years.



The Search & Rescue Tactical Vehicle (SRTV) produced by BC Customs (BCC) is in the tactical family of SXOR Mobility Vehicles. The SRTV is a platform based family of vehicle utilizing identical components with multiple body configurations. The result is a range of dimensions, crew compliments, and capabilities with no additional training or sustainment requirements.



The SRTV is constructed of MIL-STD aircraft tubing, minimizing weight, maximizing strength, and providing a skeletal base for multiple types of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) ballistic and blast armoring. BCC has utilized readily available components from the Rock/Desert racing industry with special attention paid to redundant systems required for military operations.



The SRTV has produced documented speeds of over 100 mph; vertical grades over 70 degrees, side-hill angles of over 60 degrees including a vertical step of 3 plus feet. Additionally, the SRTV can exceed double its curb weight in payload. BCC has been at this for some time and has integrated all standard military vehicle requirements such as run flats, open electronics (including Tactronics’ C4I system) as well as redundancy in all major operating systems.



There are weapons mount options: Fore and aft crew serve weapon mounts, 360 degree turret with roll protection, and standard swing arm mounts. BCC has also been working with Garwood Ind to integrate their M134 Minigun, FN to integrate their light Weapon Stations, and MSG for multiple weapon stations.



Nicknamed the “Warthog” by users, the SRTV-5 has an internal crew of three with options for up to two additional crew and two internal (roll protected) patients. The SRTV-5 is internally loadable in the CH-53E and CH-47 with rapid ground mobility within one minute.



The SRTV-22 (Osprey) variant has an internal crew of three with options for two additional crew or two (roll protected) patients, but loses either one crew member or patient as required. The variant is designed to quickly load and unload from the V-22 with no major adjustments other than collapsing the roll protection. With practice, this can take the crew only a few seconds. The body is built to meet all V-22 tolerances, including ramp over angle and footprint. Additionally, it is less than 900 lbs per wheel, making it ideal for use as an Internally Transportable Vehicle (ITV) and can be ordered with the V-22 trailer. The ramp angle and weight per wheel issues are two of the biggest issues facing vehicle designs intended for the V-22.

In addition to SOCOM interest in a new vehicle, the USAF’s Guardian Angel community recently released their third RFI in as many years looking for a specialized light rescue vehicle capable of internal and sling load transport as well as airdropability. Additionally, the RFI mentions a vehicle that can transport two PJs as well as two litter patients. BCC seems well positioned for this Guardian Angel Airdroppable Rescue Vehicle (GAARV) requirement. All SRTV variants can carry two external patients (Stokes, Israeli, Talon, or pole litters) without roll protection. Additionally, BCC is working with the Air Guard for airdrop certification.



For example, the SRTV-3 was originally designed for USAF Guardian Angel Forces in 2004 and fielded in 2007. Additionally, the SRTV was included in the Air National Guard’s (ANG) FY09 Weapons Systems Modernization Requirements documents specifically for Guardian Angel use.

BCC is currently working with the ANG on Airdrop and multiple MDS (aircraft type) ITV certifications to field a number of SRTV-5 and SRTV-22 variants for ANG rescue forces while awaiting the Air Combat Command (ACC) GAARV Solicitation process. BCC has recently fielded an SRTV-5 variant to the US Border Patrol special operations group BORSTAR. In addition to having an established product, they constantly work to improve existing vehicles as well as to develop new capabilities.

www.bccdod.com

buglerbilly
03-08-11, 12:30 AM
Turkey’s BMC is rumored to have orders for its blast-resistant Kirpi vehicle from Iraq and Afghanistan.



• 350 PS Engine
• 4x4 Wheel Configuration
• Fully Automatic / Manual Transmission
• 10-15 Full Armed Personnel
• Mine and Ballistic Treats Resistance
• CTIS – Central Tyre Inflation System
• Run/flat Tyres
• Automatic Fire Suppression

http://www.bmc.com.tr/images2/img/347/File/BMC%20MRAP%20(4X4)%20KIRPI.pdf

buglerbilly
03-08-11, 02:11 AM
Tuesday, August 2, 2011, 12:21 AM

Dassault Systèmes and Local Motors joint team to deliver the first co-created military vehicle.

Dassault Systèmes, a world leader in 3D Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) solutions, announced today that it has teamed with Local Motors (Chandler, AZ) to deliver the first co-created military vehicle.


FLYPmode military vehicle

Local Motors’ community was asked to develop a vehicle body design that could support two types of missions – Combat Reconnaissance and Combat Delivery & Evacuation. Thanks to Dassault Systèmes’ Version 6 platform and Local Motors’ expertise in crowd-based design and manufacturing, the winning vehicle went from concept to working prototype in less than six months.

Participants in the challenge submitted their designs online for review. Feedback from the community of more than 12,000 designers and enthusiasts enabled participants to incorporate novel ideas and concepts from their peers, helping to create a better vehicle in an open source process. After receiving and validating more than 150 design entries, Victor Garcia’s FLYPMode design was named the winner of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA) Crowd-derived Combat-support vehicle (XC2V) Design Challenge and was subsequently built into an operational prototype.

The FLYPMode was designed with 360 degree visibility and protection being top priority. The vehicle uses a common chassis capable of performing both combat resupply and medical evacuation missions, and has room enough for six passengers.

A modular interior allows for many parts be to either be quickly removed for increased speed, or added to provide a wide range of additional technologies. This ability to be configured on the spot allows the vehicle to perform in both combat and search and rescue situations.

buglerbilly
03-08-11, 02:18 AM
Various shots of Kirpi via Army Recognition...............





This is part of the original Turkish order for 150 vehicles, suposedly another 350 vehicles have been or will be ordered, some for the paramiltary police.

buglerbilly
05-08-11, 05:32 AM
Hmmmmmmmm, ah say, hmmmmmmm...............

Updated: Outback cripples Mercedes-Benz's toughest off-roaders

Barry Park

August 5, 2011 - 2:04PM


Broken down G-Wagens
Six out of seven of Mercedes-Benz's military-styled G-Wagens have experienced shock absorber failures during an attempt to cross the West Australian outback.

The outback proves a bit tough for some of Germany's best off-road warriors.

Mercedes-Benz has launched a rescue mission to one of the most remote sites in Australia after six of its military-style wagons broke down.

Corrugations along one 70-kilometre stretch of the Canning Stock Route burst the shock absorbers on six of the seven vehicles attempting to make what the German car maker claims is the first full crossing of the 1900-kilometre route through outback Western Australia by a car manufacturer.

Five "normal" versions of the G-Class off-roader - and one military-specification ute - started to burst mainly rear shock absorbers while travelling along stretches of the stock route extending from Well 33 to Well 35.

Fourteen people, including two Mercedes-Benz technicians and one Drive team member, are stranded at the remote site, part of an attempt to publicise the off-road credentials of the recently introduced, rugged off-road G-Class range.

The cars today limped into a campsite at Well 36, where Mercedes-Benz has temporarily halted the expedition while it waits for five new sets of shock absorbers - four in each set - to be flown in from Melbourne to a remote airstrip near Well 33, about 1000km north-east of Wiluna in central WA.

The car maker then hopes to complete the 14-day crossing, which still has about 800km to run - mainly across the dunes of the Great Sandy Desert - before reaching Halls Creek early next week.

Mercedes-Benz Australia/Pacific managing director Horst von Sanden admits the cars have been put through a lot of pain.

"When we undertook this journey we were well aware of the punishment that the vehicles would endure," he says. "We put in place a group of very experienced Outback operators who have the expertise and logistical knowledge to cover off any eventuality. This planning has more than paid off in ensuring that we reach our goal of Halls Creek on August 9, 2011.

"I have complete faith in the team out on the Canning and the thorough logistics and preparation the team have put in place," says von Sanden.

Mercedes-Benz Australia has arranged for the replacement shock absorbers to land in Perth today, before transferring to a light plane destined for a remote Aboriginal settlement close to Well 33, about 1000km from Wiluna, and at a cost of about $5000.

It will be met by the only vehicle in the expedition to not suffer a failure - a military-specification G-Wagen station wagon with a modified suspension similar to the 1800 vehicles currently being delivered to the Australian Defence Force.

Mercedes-Benz is currently assessing if it will bring the GProfessional, as the surviving vehicle is called, to Australia as part of the two-vehicle G-Class line-up, which currently only consists of the G350, powered by a 3.0-litre turbo diesel V6, and the G55 AMG, powered by a 5.5-litre V8.

Local spokesman David McCarthy says the broken shock absorbers - and three snapped spare wheel mounts - were expected.

"I think we don't make an omelette without breaking the eggs," he said. Really? How long have you been doing final testing of the Mil versions???

"We knew it would be tough, but it is important to have the right (technical) people and the right infrastructure, and I think that's proven us right."

McCarthy says the corrugations on the road today were the worst the expedition had seen so far.

"The Canning Stock Route is in very bad condition in certain areas and has caused suspension damage to most vehicles disembarking north of Well 33 over the past 48 hours," he says. "We have reduced the pace we are travelling at to ensure the vehicles remain drivable, which all seven of them currently are."

Despite the damage, McCarthy remains confident that all seven vehicles will make it to Halls Creek.

"I'm not displeased with how it's gone so far, but what I am pleased with is how we've resolved it.

"The hardest decision for me was that I had to pay for a charter plane to get the replacement parts here quicker," McCarthy says.

"For me, it was not an option to take a vehicle out [of the crossing attempt]. This has been months and months in the planning."

The day was blighted by another incident when an after-market UHF radio shorted out, taking out a number of other fuses with it, and the failure of one car's air-conditioning system, a necessity in the 30-degree-plus heat of the outback.

Redcoat
14-08-11, 10:40 AM
G Wagon ? why bother
I am sorry most Mercs are great but the G Wagon is rubbish almost any other 4x4 is better . I had one once when I was stationed in Germany never again. Why anyone would ever consider them for military use is a complete mystery

McDethWivFries
15-08-11, 01:33 PM
I still recall reading about Danish (iirc) 'recon' troops refusing to go on missions in the GW due to it being 'gutless' etc. That was after we'd signed up for them...

McFriday
15-08-11, 03:02 PM
"When we undertook this journey we were well aware of the punishment that the vehicles would endure," he says. "We put in place a group of very experienced Outback operators who have the expertise and logistical knowledge to cover off any eventuality."

Except obviously this one!!

I wonder how you say "Old Man Emu" in German? Not that my OME's ever exploded but what 'expert' preparation didn't include at least one set of shocks for such a team trip?

I wonder how they're holding for spare hoses, engine belts, tyre plugs and at least one each starter motor and alternator?

It's no secret what that track's like, any 4WD magazine's archive has articles that should have prepared them for the corrugations etc. Attempting that traverse without spare shocks is either stupid or arrogant.

If, as he infers, they were hammering the vehicles over the corrugations it is even more idiotic that they weren't carrying spares.

Mac

buglerbilly
16-08-11, 03:54 AM
Supacat submits bid for JP2097 Ph 1B (REDFIN)

August 16, 2011



Supacat Team Australia submitted its bid today to the Australian Defence Material Office (DMO) for the JP2097 Ph 1B (REDFIN) programme, offering the proven Special Forces HMT Extenda vehicle at the very latest configuration to meet the requirement.

The Supacat HMT series is world renowned as the vehicle of choice for Special Forces, including Australia. The REDFIN 1B vehicle shares commonality with the Nary HMT fleet, which Supacat successfully delivered to the DMO in October 2009. Supacat is a proven supplier to the DMO and to the UK Ministry of Defence for whom it has delivered over 500 HMT vehicles, Jackal and Coyote, into service in Afghanistan.

Supacat has selected and signed MOUs with proven Australian suppliers to form Supacat Team Australia. The team will build and deliver REDFIN Ph 1B efficiently and on a best value basis for the Commonwealth of Australia whilst creating and sustaining high value Australian jobs. Supacat's Global Support Solution is already supporting in-service vehicles in Australia and will be expanded to support the REDFIN Ph 1B fleet.

Designed for use by Special Forces, the HMT Extenda is unique in being convertible to either a 4x4 or 6x6 configuration to meet different operational requirements by inserting or removing a self-contained third axle unit. Like other HMT series platforms, the HMT Extenda can be supplied with optional mine blast and ballistic protection kits and with a variety of mission hampers, weapons, communications, ISTAR and force protection equipment to suit a wide range of operational roles. Supacat's 1B solution offers capability improvements in the key areas of firepower, protection, capacity, operability and safety based upon direct feedback from the worldwide operational use of existing HMT fleets. There are also a number of options offered that the Commonwealth may wish to choose from.

Nick Ames, Managing Director of Supacat said, "The HMT Extenda is a proven off the shelf capability and the best in class to meet the REDFIN requirement while offering the cost benefits of fleet commonality within Australian forces. Supacat has proven itself as a supplier to DMO and is fully committed to partnering with Australian industry to transfer capability and give local companies entry into global supply chains".

Source: Supacat



Armour layout.........

buglerbilly
16-08-11, 05:06 AM
Details of 1B are here:

http://www.defence.gov.au/dmo/id/dcp/html_dec10/jp/JP2097.html

buglerbilly
18-08-11, 12:25 PM
BAE Launch New Casspir Vehicle





Johannesburg, South Africa - BAE Systems is releasing details of the latest addition to its proven mine protected vehicle range, the Casspir Mk6 Armoured Personnel Carrier (APC).

The Casspir Mk6 evolved from the reliable and renowned Casspir heritage. The latest development also incorporates experience from the battle proven RG31 (over 2400 in service) to ensure a superior and affordable APC.

"This new version integrates decades of experience saving lives, offering a solution with a world class track record", said Johan Steyn, Managing Director, Land Systems South Africa. "With proven mobility, crew and ballistic protection, getting the soldiers safely around any environment was top of mind during development of this vehicle," added Steyn.

The Casspir Mk6 is an open architecture fit for many applications including the option for different variants - 4x4, 6x6, utility, APC and command. This battle-proven workhorse with its robust design is suitable for the harshest African conditions. COTS (Commercial-off-the-shelve) building blocks are used in the design and manufacturing for increased cost benefit, and contributing to the superior mine protection is the monocoque V-shaped hull.

The Casspir Mk6 measures approximately 7.59 meters in length, 2.67 meters in width, with a ground clearance of 380 millimeters. Its gross vehicle mass is 14,320 kg and seats 16 crew members. The straight forward utilisation of a total commercial drive train ensures affordability of this battle proven vehicle.

Source : BAE Systems PLC (LSE: BAES.L)

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news/37579/BAE_Launch_New_Casspir_Vehicle.htm#ixzz1VNVq3pyC

buglerbilly
25-08-11, 10:28 AM
Force Protection Australasia submits REDFIN bid

August 25, 2011

Force Protection Australasia Pty Ltd (FPA), a FORCE PROTECTION, INC. group company today announced it has submitted a bid to the Australian Defence Materiel Organisation for the manufacture of Special Operations Vehicles - Commando for the Australian Defence Force.

The tender for Project JP 2097 Phase 1B (also known as Project REDFIN) is based on a variant of the company's Ocelot vehicle, which is already being evaluated as part of the Australian Government's Land 121 Phase 4 Protected Mobility Vehicle - Light (PMV-L) program.

Force Protection Australasia Managing Director, Dave Miller, says the Commando variant continues the Ocelot's core design concept whereby the crew and passengers sit inside a protective pod made of advanced composite materials while beneath them critical components such as the engine, fuel tank and transmission are contained in a V-shaped armoured spine that deflects a blast away from the vehicle.

"We're very confident our team has produced the most highly protected and agile vehicle of its size and weight available on today's market. One of the most attractive aspects of the vehicle, on top of its survivability levels which protect the crew and mission systems, is its unique modular construction which means that pods can easily be changed in theatre to suit the requirements of each mission," Mr. Miller said.

The vehicle has already proven its worth when Force Protection was recently contracted by the UK's Ministry of Defence (MoD) to supply its Ocelot for the MoD's urgent operational requirement for the Light Protected Patrol Vehicle program (LPPV).

The first of these vehicles, known as the Foxhound in the UK, is now in production and will be in service by mid-2012. Force Protection vehicles already represent some 46 per cent of the UK Army's Protected Patrol Vehicle fleet.

Force Protection Australasia is one of three companies selected for consideration to undertake the next phase of the Land 121 Phase 4 Manufactured and Supported in Australia (MSA) program, with the contract for the future production of up to 1300 vehicles valued at more than $A1 billion by the Australian Government.

The survivability and reliability of Force Protection's range of vehicles globally is demonstrated by the fact they have survived in excess of 4,000 IED and land blasts, and that the majority of its vehicles in service since 2004 remain operational.

Source: Force Protection

buglerbilly
27-08-11, 01:22 AM
Mahindra-BAE Mine-Protected Vehicles Delivered

By VIVEK RAGHUVANSHI

Published: 26 Aug 2011 09:46



NEW DELHI - The first lot of six mine-protected vehicles jointly developed by BAE Systems and India's auto major, Mahindra Group, has been delivered to the state police of Jharkhand, which are fighting an internal Maoist insurgency.

The Aug. 25 delivery marks the beginning of serial production of the vehicles at Mahindra Land Systems in India's Faridabad-based plant, a company executive said. This represents the first infantry combat vehicle of this kind produced by the Indian private sector, he said.

Mahindra Defence Systems is producing a variety of military vehicles for the Indian Army and the paramilitary forces. The Army's requirement for special military vehicles is estimated to be more than $3 billion.

The Army proposes to purchase more than 10,000 light military vehicles over the next five to seven years valued at more than $2 billion, and the majority of these will be produced by private defense companies in collaboration with overseas firms.

These vehicles will be purchased in phases. The Army requires that the vehicles include four-wheel drive, a high power-to-weight ratio, are capable of traveling 80 kilometers per hour and carrying rocket launchers, and are equipped with GPS navigation.

The Army uses about 2,000 Russian BMP-1 and BMP-2 multipurpose armored vehicles equipped with anti-tank missiles and other weapons. The state owned Ordnance Factory at Jabalpur produced the Jonga light vehicle, which has been stopped since 1998.

The Army also is procuring light bulletproof vehicles, for which Mahindra & Mahindra Defence, Tata Motors, Vectra Motors, Force Motors, Concord and the Ordnance Factories Board are in the running.

buglerbilly
30-08-11, 12:06 PM
Oshkosh Defense delivers Canadian TAPV for testing

August 30, 2011



Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, today delivered the Oshkosh Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) to Aberdeen Test Center in Maryland where the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) will conduct mobility, survivability and weapons testing. Oshkosh Defense's response to the TAPV solicitation was submitted to the Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) last week.

"Today, Oshkosh has delivered the best solution for the TAPV program including the most advanced military vehicle technologies and the finest Canadian-based sustainment services for the DND," said Serge Buchakjian, senior vice president and general manager of International Programs for Oshkosh Defense. "Our TAPV is a fully integrated vehicle that is customized to the Canadian Force's specific requirements, offering them the best-value solution. With our partners at General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada and Oshkosh Corporation's London Machinery, Inc., we can produce the vehicle in a way that creates considerable benefits for the Canadian economy for the next 25 years."

The TAPV is intended to replace the Armoured Patrol Vehicle (APV) and the Coyote reconnaissance vehicle, to help ensure the Canadian Army remains capable of effective training, supporting domestic operations and sustaining deployed forces as part of the Canada First Defence Strategy. The Oshkosh TAPV, which is based on the company's proven Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) platform, leverages a mission-proven chassis and the patented TAK-4® independent suspension system used on more than 20,000 military-class vehicles, which have proven highly-effective in some of the most extreme operating environments, including Afghanistan.

In independent testing conducted to date, the Oshkosh TAPV has undergone on- and off-road durability validation, successfully met ballistic and other survivability threat requirements (including the use of steel-pot method for NATO STANAG blast tests), and completed extensive live-fire demonstrations of the fully integrated dual Remote Weapon Station (RWS). The combination of these activities demonstrates the effectiveness, maturity and reliability of the Oshkosh TAPV.

Oshkosh Defense is teamed with General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada and Oshkosh Corporation subsidiary London Machinery, Inc. (LMI) in its bid for the TAPV program. General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada will provide in-country support and system integration. LMI will contribute local advanced manufacturing capabilities to assemble the vehicle, conduct subsystem integration and final acceptance testing, which will be performed by its highly skilled workforce.

Source: Oshkosh Defense

buglerbilly
31-08-11, 01:38 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

JLTV Program Going Through Big Changes

Posted by Paul McLeary at 8/30/2011 11:32 AM CDT



If it’s even possible for a Pentagon acquisition program that could cost up to $70 billion (pdf) to be compared to a forgotten middle child, then the joint Army/Marine Corps’ Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) is it. Kicked off in 2006—before the MRAP program even really got started—the JLTV has been trudging along for a half decade now, piling up unanswered questions. We still don’t know how many trucks the Army and Marines want (or if the Marines even want it), how much each vehicle is supposed to cost, or even what the final requirements are for its design.

All of these uncertainties have to some extent been buried by the Army’s ambitious—and on some level equally uncertain—plans for the Ground Combat Vehicle and growing buzz about the Humvee Recap program.

While things may have appeared quiet on the JLTV front as of late, there’s actually lots going on within this fluid program, including a testing and evaluation schedule that is both being pushed back in the near term while sped up on the back end, and the promise of some serious reductions in how much the whole thing will cost.

Eyebrows were raised earlier this year when the House and Senate Armed Services committees agreed to cut $50 million from the requested $172 million fiscal 2012 budget for the JLTV, moving that cash over to the nascent Humvee Recap program. But that $50 million was only the beginning, Aviation Week has learned. “We’re looking to take more money out than that,” says Col. David Bassett, the U.S. Army’s project manager for tactical vehicles.

The way to do that is to push back the expected award date for the JLTV’s Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase, while shortening that planned four-year phase to accelerate the program schedule overall. The EMD phase will also be a full and open competition open to all bidders, and not just the three teams led by BAE Systems; Lockheed Martin; and General Tactical Vehicles, a joint venture between General Dynamics and AM General, which have already won development contracts. Bassett said that he expects to issue a draft request for proposals (RFP) this fall, “and assuming that we get approval for the updated program, we would be looking out at the spring of next year for the next round of contract awards.”

The program is currently at the end of its Technology Development phase, and Bassett says his office is taking what was learned there in the relationship between cost, weight, protection and reliability, and is making trades in order to save time and money on the program. “The protection level of the vehicle we know is going up from what it was in the last phase,” he says. “We’re looking for a vehicle that has more protection than the previous JLTV threshold.” More savings will come in the armor packages he’s asking for. He is not buying “b-kit” armor for every truck in keeping with the Army’s tactical wheeled vehicle strategy, which calls for 50% of the fleet to be armor-capable while having armor kits for one-third of the fleet. This will save fuel in training, and will still allow commanders to surge production of the latest armor when a threat arises. Bassett is also “looking for trades across the potential C4ISR architecture to make sure we have the capability for future growth without locking ourselves into an architecture that might eventually be overcome by technology.”

In the time since the three industry teams started building their trucks when contract awards were made in 2008, the program—and the Army’s wheeled vehicle fleet—have gone through quite a few changes. Since then, MRAPs and MATVs and up-armored Humvees have come on line by the thousands, and the Stryker has grown to become a big part of the Army future. Through it all, the JLTV has remained something of an enigma. With so many different armored vehicles out there, and with the GCV and the Recapped Humvees looming on the horizon, will the Army finally clearly define the goals—and cost—of the JLTV program? The RFP that is slated for this fall is huge for the future of the program.

(Click here for pics I took of the three models last year at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds.)

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/defense/index.jsp?plckController=Blog&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&newspaperUserId=27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7&plckPostId=Blog%3A27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7Post%3A9f35f022-746e-4528-9243-2ec6aa4430ce&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest

Tomorrow, I’ll have a post on how the Humvee recap program fits into all this.

buglerbilly
31-08-11, 04:45 AM
Revealed: New Defender

Stephen Ottley

August 31, 2011 - 11:37AM


Land Rover DC100 concept, a modern interpretation of the Land Rover Defender, will debut at the 2011 Frankfurt motor show.

Land Rover's iconic off-roader gets extreme makeover.

This is the radical all-new look for the classic Land Rover Defender. After 64 years of almost unchanged service the go-anywhere off-roader will be replaced by all-new model in 2015.

Officially still only a concept, the DC100 is designed to test the public’s reaction to the new look before the final production version is signed off.

“Replacing the iconic Defender is one of the biggest challenges in the automotive design world; it is a car that inspires people worldwide,” says Land Rover design boss, Gerry McGovern.



“This isn't a production-ready concept but the beginning of a four-year journey to design a relevant Defender for the 21st century."

As Drive reported recently the company is determined to continue the Defender but admits a complete overhaul is required to bring it into the 21st century.

Although the Defender is one of the motoring world’s most famous vehicles Land Rover only sells approximately 20,000 units annually around the world.

The new model is designed to appeal to a much bigger audience as the company tries to catch up to newer off-roader rivals in the booming SUV segment.

“Loved the world over for its simple, honest and distinctive design, we are determined that the new Defender will be true to its heritage, while meeting the requirements of a changing global market,” says John Edwards, Land Rover’s Global Brand Director.

“We plan to engage with existing and potential customers to help us finalise the details of the new vehicle. One thing's for sure, it's going to be an exciting journey, and we can't wait to get going."

The engineering team behind the Defender is headed by Australian ex-pat Murray Dietsch, who worked on the Ford Territory. He confirmed that his team is working hard to ensure the Defender remains one of the most capable off-road vehicles, even though it’s expected to add more car-like safety features and creature comforts.

“We’ve been working on Defender for a while,” Dietsch said recently. “The company’s pretty serious about it.

“We’re working on it and we’re making sure that whatever we produce in the future is not going to dilute what Defender really stands for. So it needs to be authentic."

"If someone’s going to get in the car they’re going to want to get in the car and do stuff with it and say ‘I don’t want it to break, I want it to go places that other things won’t take me to’.”

The DC100 will have its official unveiling at the Frankfurt motor show on September 13.

buglerbilly
01-09-11, 11:33 AM
BAE Continues its Emphasis on Teaming with Canadian Industry



Ottawa, Canada - BAE Systems has again teamed with Canadian industry to provide the best of Canadian technology and capability as part of their response to the Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) program.

BAE Systems announced teaming agreements with DEW Engineering and Thales Canada during the CANSEC exhibition in Ottawa in June. Today, BAE Systems announces it has signed a teaming agreement with Bluedrop Performance Learning. Bluedrop will provide training support to the DND for the BAE Systems TAPV vehicle fleet. The training element of the teaming agreement will include all operator training for the vehicle system and remote weapon system, including all related maintenance training for the first line support organizations in the Canadian Forces.

"Bluedrop is proud to support the BAE Systems TAPV team in offering the Canadian Forces a new standard of survivability, mobility and fighting capability," said Allen Dillon, EVP Defence and Aerospace at Bluedrop. "Our aim is focused directly on providing the very best training available to the men and women in uniform, ultimately contributing to their success and safety as they perform their mission."

Bluedrop would lead and coordinate the training program for TAPV at several operating and support bases in Canada, ensuring the Canadian Forces have the necessary skill to deliver and support the BAE Systems TAPV fleet throughout its lifecycle. The effort includes the design and development of the training framework, materials, aids and simulation devices that will ensure the readiness of Canadian Forces to operate and support a new standard in Combat Vehicles.

"We are confident we have the best solution and the best strategic partnerships to deliver on all aspects of the TAPV program," said Chris Chambers GM and VP BAE Systems Tactical Wheeled Vehicles. "We are dedicated to continued investment in Canadian industry through all the BAE Systems programs", added Chambers.

The purpose built RG35 RPU (Reconnaissance, Patrol and Utility) base vehicle, with Thales Canada and DEW Engineering integrated systems, delivers the crucial balance of proven survivability and tactical mobility Canadian troops currently need and will require in the future.

BAE Systems has operated in Canada since 2000. The company has a strong track record in delivering economic benefit by partnering with domestic industries and delivering on offset commitments.

Source : BAE Systems PLC (LSE: BAES.L)

Published on ASDNews: Sep 1, 2011

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news/37842/BAE_Continues_its_Emphasis_on_Teaming_with_Canadia n_Industry.htm#ixzz1WhAjkyb0

buglerbilly
02-09-11, 03:49 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

Draft RFP for Humvee Recap Coming 'Within Weeks'

Posted by Paul McLeary at 9/1/2011 9:00 AM CDT



With competitions for the Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle and Joint Light Tactical Vehicle development programs well under way—such as they are—the next box to be ticked off for the U.S. Army’s reset of its combat vehicle fleet is the HMMWV Recap program. While no request for proposals has been issued, Col. David Bassett, the U.S. Army’s project manager for tactical vehicles, told Aviation Week that a draft RFP will come out “within the next few weeks,” followed by an industry day.

While a recap of the iconic Humvee will give the vehicles better armor protection, an upgraded suspension system and other upgrades, it’ll also extend the life of the vehicle into the 2030s—a long haul from its birth in the 1980s. The Recap of anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 Army Humvees as well as at least 3,400 Marine Corps trucks has created some tension with the JLTV program, with some wondering if the Pentagon can afford both programs at a time when budgets are due to start getting a little tighter. Bassett, who as of this month manages both programs, insists that they’re complementary rather than in competition. He is quick to say that “we’ve structured these as two mutually supportive programs, where Humvee Recap is intended to demonstrate for the Army exactly how much improvement they can gain in their light fleet though an upgrade of the truck they have, at a cost that the Army would be willing to invest.”

Bassett also stressed that the Recap must “be cheap enough where there’s no confusion in the strategy between the role of a Humvee Recap and the role of a JLTV. At the same time we want to make sure that the JLTV remains a significant leap ahead in capability both over the upgraded Humvee and the existing Humvee fleet … There is clearly going to be a difference between the Humvee and JLTV.” In other words, while the Army is looking for the Recap program to use existing, mature technologies to refit the fleet, it is looking to the JLTV for new communications and armor solutions that make it a leap-ahead truck. Still, while the Army has established a base price of $180,000 for each recapped Humvee, after five years of development there’s still no hard cost projection for the JLTV, something Bassett chalks up to changing requirements, threats and evolving technology.

But since we now know that requirements documents are coming out for both trucks at some point this fall—while the Ground Combat Vehicle languishes under a stop-work order—we’ll see how the upcoming “Super Congress” tasked with finding another $1.2 billion in government savings treats these multiple, expensive Army truck programs.

buglerbilly
02-09-11, 11:38 AM
Force Protection submits bid for Canada's TAPV Project

September 02, 2011



Force Protection Industries, Inc., a FORCE PROTECTION, INC. group company, today announced the submission of a bid and test vehicle to the Canadian Forces for the Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) project.

Force Protection is offering the Canadian Forces a 6x6 variant of the battle proven Cougar wheeled combat vehicle developed by Force Protection to meet the TAPV requirements. Force Protection will be the design authority and have overall responsibility for the acquisition contract to supply the TAPV vehicles and maintain configuration control.

As Force Protection's main Canadian partner, CAE will have overall responsibility for the comprehensive in-service support (ISS) solution, including: vehicle operator and mission training systems; engineering information environment; fleet management services; systems engineering support; and, lifecycle and integrated logistics support services. CAE will also be responsible for assembling a pan-Canadian team of companies to develop and support any country-specific requirements for Canada's replacement fleet of tactical armored patrol vehicles.

Force Protection and CAE previously announced a collaboration that includes Elbit Systems as the provider for a dual remote weapons system (DRWS) and Lockheed Martin Canada as the provider of C4ISR suite for the Timberwolf vehicle. Elbit Systems' Land and C4I DRWS was chosen based on its superior performance, reliability and ease of integration. Lockheed Martin Canada was chosen as the C4ISR integrator for Timberwolf based on its recognized capability in the development, production and support for integrated C4 systems.

Randy Hutcherson, Chief of Business Development for Force Protection, said, "Partnered with CAE, Force Protection is pleased to formally submit Timberwolf as the optimal solution for the TAPV project. Along with our key providers, we are committed to offering the Canadian Forces a highly-protected and reliable vehicle, as well as Industrial and Regional Benefits that will contribute to investment in Canadian industry and provide further experience and capability in the armored vehicle market."

A contract award to the final selected bidder for the TAPV requirement is currently expected by the second quarter of 2012.

Source: Force Protection

buglerbilly
02-09-11, 11:39 AM
This pic is from the Ottowa Citizen blog and shows the RG-35 being delivered for the TAPV programme...................

buglerbilly
02-09-11, 11:48 AM
And a slightly older announcement from Textron (day before) covering their ASV-derived proposal for the TAPV...........

Textron Submits Its Proposal for Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) Project

September 1, 2011. 11:45 am

Posted by:

David Pugliese

Textron Systems Canada Inc. has announced that it also submitted its proposal for the Canadian Forces Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) program.

More from the company’s press release:

The Textron TAPV Team, led by Textron Systems Canada, includes Textron Marine & Land Systems and Rheinmetall Canada. Additional key Canadian suppliers include: Kongsberg Protech Systems Canada, a subcontractor to Rheinmetall Canada for the Remote Weapons Systems; and Engineering Office Deisenroth Canada (EODC), a subcontractor direct to Textron Systems Canada for add-on armour.

A contract for the TAPV program to procure 500 vehicles, with an option for up to 100 more, is expected to be awarded in early 2012.

“The Textron TAPV Team is pleased to be offering a 4 by 4 armoured vehicle that will provide the Canadian Forces with an unmatched blend of survivability, protection, power, mobility and versatility,” said Neil Rutter, general manager of Textron Systems Canada. “We also have submitted a comprehensive Industrial and Regional Benefits plan that effectively engages Canadian companies from coast to coast, provides jobs to Canadians, and provides substantial Canadian content in each vehicle.”

Textron’s proposed TAPV, specifically engineered to meet Canadian Forces requirements, draws on Textron Marine & Land Systems’ more than 45 years of experience in the design and production of armoured vehicles. Building from the combat-tested Armored Security Vehicle platform, Textron’s TAPV has undergone five years of extensive research and development. The result is a technology readiness level (TRL) 8 vehicle, designed to deliver outstanding performance and sustainability for a broad spectrum of operations in the world’s most challenging environments.

If awarded the TAPV project, Ottawa-based Textron Systems Canada, as prime contractor, will provide overall program and configuration management, act as the design authority for change management, coordinate vehicle integration activities by Canadian subcontractors, manage the 25-year In-Service Support contract, and execute the Industrial and Regional Benefits program.

Rheinmetall Canada (www.rheinmetall.ca), at its facilities in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Ottawa, will perform multiple integration functions and final vehicle assembly to include the remote weapons station and government furnished equipment, and play a large role in the program’s long-term system support.
Kongsberg Protech Systems Canada (www.kongsberg.com/en/KPS) will provide its Remote Weapon Station (RWS) for the Textron TAPV vehicle through a subcontract with Rheinmetall Canada. Kongsberg would be responsible for assembly, testing, and delivery of its RWS for the TAPV program, using its production facility in London, Ontario.

EODC (www.eodc.ca), an IBD-owned Canadian company based in Ottawa, is offering IBD’s fourth-generation Advanced Modular Armour Protection (AMAP) technology in support of the Textron TAPV. This newest ballistic protection technology includes the use of nano-ceramics and nano-steels to provide enhanced vehicle survivability at lower weight levels.

Textron Systems Canada brings the broad capabilities of Textron Systems’ operating units to Canadian customers. The company is currently focused on the Canadian Forces’ Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle program. More information is available at www.textrontapv.ca <http://www.textrontapv.ca> .

buglerbilly
02-09-11, 11:51 AM
And NEXTER has dropped out..........

Nexter Drops Out of TAPV Race

July 29, 2011. 12:18 am • Section: Defence Watch

By David Pugliese

Defence Watch

Sources tell Defence Watch that Nexter has indeed left the competition to provide the Canadian Forces with a fleet of Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicles.

You may recall that in the spring this claim had surfaced, with some in industry saying Nexter would quietly exit the competition while others insisted that the French company would stay in.

Nexter Systems of France had been offering the Canadian Forces its Aravis vehicle.

But sources now say Nexter officials have not attended the last two mandatory (for potential bidders) meetings on TAPV and that the firm has decided not to take part in the competition.

Nexter did not respond to a request for comment on the issue.

Nexter, however, is continuing on with the Close Combat Vehicle, offering Canada its VBCI armoured vehicle for that project.

Earlier, Thales decided to drop out of the Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle program after determining its Bushmaster didn’t fit the requirements.

The Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle program will replace the Canadian army’s existing fleet of RG-31 mine protected vehicles and the Coyote wheeled light armored vehicles. Besides the initial procurement of 500 vehicles, there is an option for an additional 100.

Aravis photo below from Nexter:

buglerbilly
07-09-11, 02:43 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

U.S. Military Truck Makers Looking Overseas

Posted by Paul McLeary at 9/6/2011 9:48 AM CDT



No matter what happens to the JLTV, GCV and Humvee Recap programs domestically, the defense industry is well aware of the fact that it’s a wide, wide world out there, with plenty of other countries looking for armored trucks to fill a variety of different needs.

Despite defense budget contractions, the international market remains wide open, hungry for the innovations that the U.S. market pays to develop, prove and put into the field. “The trend in the international market is following the U.S. example,” says BAE Systems’ John Kelly, vice president of business winning for land and armaments. In other words, pretty much everyone wants greater mobility, better protection and lighter armor.

While the international market might take its cues from what happens in the U.S., manufacturers can’t just show up with trucks and expect to win business, according to industry insiders. The key to winning and maintaining foreign business is to go local—working with local manufacturers to create long-term partnerships.

Navistar Defense, for one, is planning for when U.S. and NATO forces pull out of Afghanistan and Iraq by developing the company’s defense and commercial base in both countries. There’s already a good parts base for commercial and military trucks in both countries, the company’s director of business development, Rob Puhalovich says, adding that Navistar wants to start building dealerships to “support the war effort today and then transition to peacetime.” The effort will mirror what that company has done in countries such as Canada, South Africa and Australia, where it already had a solid commercial base from which to build defense offerings. “We’re chasing deals in markets where we have had a commercial presence,” he says.

There’s a consensus among industry leaders that some of the biggest markets for new military vehicles are Saudi Arabia, which is constantly upgrading its fleet; Canada, which is in the middle of the selection process for three different vehicles; and emerging markets such as Brazil, Chile, India and Malaysia. All of these countries have open vehicle programs and have partnered with U.S.-based companies to produce vehicles and parts domestically. Kelly says that as a general rule, market trends favor “wheeled vehicles over tracked vehicles,” and like Puhalovich, he says that after a sale a “key part of the business is support and technical services,” which can continue for decades...

buglerbilly
09-09-11, 01:25 AM
France Adds 200 Armored Vehicles to Panhard Buy

By PIERRE TRAN

Published: 8 Sep 2011 14:13


This image is the HD version (Heavy Duty)

PARIS - The Direction Générale de l'Armement (DGA) has ordered a further 200 small armored vehicles from Panhard, boosting a previous contract for 933 units, the procurement office said in Sept. 8 statement.

"The Direction Générale de l'Armement (DGA) ordered from Panhard General Defense Sept. 6, 2011, 200 PVP for the Army," the procurement office said.

The PVP is the Petit Véhicule Protegé, an armored four-wheel-drive vehicle that can be fitted with a 7.62mm machine gun on a remote-operated turret.

The new batch of vehicles will be delivered in 2012. The last of the 933 units ordered in 2004 will be produced in December of this year, the DGA said.

No financial details were available.

The PVP has been deployed in Lebanon and Afghanistan.

Production of the PVP at two Panhard sites has so far generated 1 million hours of work, the DGA said.

buglerbilly
12-09-11, 01:59 PM
Acquisition of Armored Vehicles for Operational Theater

(Source: Spanish Government; issued Sept. 9, 2011)

(Issued in Spanish only; unofficial translation by defense-aerospace.com)


Spanish LINCE aka IVECO LMV..........

MADRID --- The Council of Ministers has approved two contracts for the acquisition of 76 “Lince” armored all-terrain vehicles (squad version, 5 passengers) and 20 armored all-terrain type RG-31 (platoon version, nine passengers), for an estimated cost of 24,628,606.36 euros and 15,331,807.59 euros, respectively.

The acquisition of these armored vehicles is intended to ensure adequate conditions of safety and security during troop movements in the area of operations during international peacekeeping missions.

Protection of Spanish armed forces personnel makes it necessary to continue with current efforts to provide deployed units with suitable equipment, able to protect them against threats in the area of operations which, according all accounts, including from the troops themselves, consist mainly of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), conventional small arms and anti-tank grenade launchers (RPGs).

Therefore it is necessary to purchase vehicles that are fitted with armor protection able to strengthen their security against attacks using assault rifles and explosive charges.


Some of Spanish Army RG-31 MK 5E feature the Rafael Advanced Defense Systems Ltd Mini SAMSON weapon station (GD SBS).

-ends-

buglerbilly
12-09-11, 02:28 PM
Supacat unveils production standard SPV400 with improved ride and reliability at DSEi



06:01 GMT, September 12, 2011 At DSEi 2011 Supacat is unveiling the production standard Supacat Protected Vehicle 400 (SPV400), which has achieved new levels of reliability and significantly improved ride and handling as a result of an intensive year long development programme. The vehicle also features enhanced maintainability, a revised driver interface and new front end styling. The 7th vehicle at the latest configuration will be on show at stand N9-380.

Supacat has continued to rapidly develop the SPV400 to mature the design from the prototype testing phase to a production standard. Since being assessed for the UK MoD’s Light Protected Patrol Vehicle (LPPV) requirement last year, Supacat has subjected the SPV400 to over 10,000 km of reliability testing with over 70% conducted off-road, more than doubling the total trials distances undertaken during the LPPV assessment.

“The new production standard SPV400 is a significantly improved vehicle from the early prototypes. We have achieved new levels of reliability, handling and overall usability in the automotive design that surpass those required by LPPV”, said Nick Ames, Managing Director, Supacat. “This is a vastly different vehicle from the one we had twelve months ago and we’re proud of the progress we’ve made”.

Supacat continued to develop the SPV400 light protected patrol vehicle to meet international demand for this new class of vehicle in military and non-military markets. The SPV400 is one of only two vehicles to succeed in meeting the UK Ministry of Defence’s demanding requirements for its new Light Protected Patrol Vehicle (LPPV).

SPV400 Improvements

Ride and handling has been optimised considerably to increase responsiveness and improve 'driver feel'. This has been achieved by developing new suspension geometry with a new spring and damper set-up, coupled with a high pressure pneumatic system improving suspension response times and also minimizing space required for air-stowage. In addition, the vehicle is fitted with a new brake system using a Hydro-Max hydraulic boosted brake system with separate ABS. To lighten the driver burden Supacat will soon trial an ‘automatic torque sensing’ centre differential, which adjusts torque to each axle dependent on the terrain.

The interior has also undergone a number of refinements, including improved lighting. The driver interface has been revised with new instrument panel and driver control layouts with a new driver display designed to incorporate GVA (Generic Vehicle Architecture) and vehicle diagnostic systems.

Maintainability has been improved by integrating the cooling and hydraulic pipework with the cooling pack into a single module, thus allowing easier access to inspect or replace engine components. A new ground-driven steering pump has been incorporated to maintain power assistance in the event of a stopped engine, for example, if fuel runs out. A dashboard controlled Central Tyre Inflation System (CTIS) has also been fitted. Other enhancements to the pre-production SPV400 are the development of vehicle CAN (Controller Area Network) system including a battery management system, automatic park brake release, driveline control, cruise control and intelligent lighting system.

The SPV400

A light patrol vehicle in the 7.5 ton class, it carries a crew of six (2 +4) and combines an integrated blast and ballistic protection system, including a protected all composite crew pod and V-shaped hull. Using the latest composite and ceramic armour systems, the crew pod is constructed as a separate module, sealed off from potential secondary projectiles, such as kit and electronic devices, which are housed in a rear compartment. All seats are mine blast protected. Its exceptional all terrain, high mobility performance is comparable to the Supacat-designed Jackal and is capable of speeds up to 80mph on the desert plain.

A modular and future-proofed design allows the SPV400 to be upgraded to meet evolving threats and requirements. The V shaped hull protects the crew in an under-belly mine strike scenario, while the modular approach enables the SPV400 to be repaired in theatre following mine blast incidents by replacing the damaged module(s).

Air suspension provides troops with a smooth ride, reducing crew fatigue and conventional steering reduces complexity.

buglerbilly
12-09-11, 09:21 PM
Advanced Recovery Systems Introduced to Support New Light Protected Patrol Vehicles


The EKA recovery equipment is integrated onto a specialist ‘skid’ built by Penman, which closely matches the operational requirements for both recovery and automotive performance. In operation, the new unit is effectively similar to a downscaled version of the larger SuperCompact equipment. Photo: Penman

The new family of light protected patrol vehicles soon to be inducted in service will require new support systems, particularly recovery systems enhancing the mobility and self recovery of such vehicles, and recovery vehicles capable of moving and operating in confined urban spaces where the LPPV will typically operate. Two british companies addressing these requirements debut such systems at DSEi 2011.

The Lightweight Recovery Vehicle (LRV) making its international market debut at DSEi 2011 was developed by Penman-EKA, a newly formed joint venture between recovery vehicle specialist EKA, and Penman.

The new vehicle was designed as a powerful yet manoeuvrable recovery platform designed to support the new class of protected lightweight vehicles. These small, protected vehicles may require rescue from narrow and confined locations such as village streets – where heavier, full-width recovery vehicles cannot penetrate. The first LRV vehicle to be built is based on the DURO 3 6×6 re-roled logistics chassis from General Dynamics Europe, forming a compact, 2.16 metre width LRV. It incorporates key elements from the EKA SuperCompact system incorporated with the fleet of Support Vehicle (Recovery), currently in service with the UK MoD, thereby reducing and simplifying logistics support. According to the developers, the concept has been designed for application and integration with other suitable vehicle platforms.

The EKA recovery equipment is integrated onto a specialist ‘skid’ built by Penman, which closely matches the operational requirements for both recovery and automotive performance. In operation, the new unit is effectively similar to a downscaled version of the larger SuperCompact equipment.

The recovery boom assembly comprises a telescopic rectangular section, the inner box of which carries the recovery bar assembly. The boom provides a maximum lift rating of 6 tonnes and a maximum casualty vehicle weight capability of 15 tonnes. An 8 tonne constant-pull capstan winch is fitted and, in order to anchor the vehicle when winching to the rear, two 8 tonne rated anchor spades are provided to enable two-part pulls to be carried out.

Safe stand-off remote operation of the recovery system is controlled from a chest pack with a 10 metre umbilical, connected to a frame mounted control box on the vehicle. The chest pack features graduable paddle joysticks (suitable for gloved operation) for boom in/out, boom up/down and recovery bar levelling.

Apart from the specialist ‘skid’ onto which the recovery system is integrated, Penman has upgraded and modified the vehicle platform to meet anticipated operational requirements. An additional cab seat is provided within the fully armoured tilt cab – as are riot grilles and a cab escape facility. Up-rated heavy duty springs, shock absorbers and off-road tyres have been added to further enhance the vehicle’s all-terrain performance. Other features include full fitment for current in-service ECM and EECM, including power provision and cooling.


The first LRV vehicle to be built is based on the DURO 3 6x6 re-roled logistics chassis from General Dynamics Europe, forming a compact, 2.16 metre width LRV. Photo: Penman

buglerbilly
13-09-11, 02:53 AM
Extended Zephyr Multi-Role Vehicle Debuts at DSEi 2011


Zephyr Multi-Role Vehicle (MRV) from Creation UK. The platform has been configured to provide a wide range of missions, both combat, combat support, logistics etc. Photo: Creation UK

Zephyr protected vehicle designed by Creation is displayed at DSEi 2011 in a new configuration, reflecting the latest upgrade variant. The vehicle is now available in two- and three-axle configurations. Zephyr’s protection architecture features a composite ‘occupant survival cell’ employing a V-form belly plate and an integral blast mitigation system. The vehicle offers basic protection specified for minimum STANAG 4569 level 2 mine protection and level 2-3 KE protection. Fragment protection is taken to level 4. ‘LifeSeat One’ blast protecting seats were also installed, isolating the passenger from extreme body shock and skeletal injury potential resulting from IED and mine blasts.

Zephyr design concept envisaged a fully functional rolling Mine Resistant Underframe (MRU), configured with protected, soft-skin or demountable top cabs, citadels or other structures. Production ready units have sofar focused around protected patrol vehicle requirements, whilst concurrent design and pre-production studies have addressed other applications including specialist vehicles, pick-up utility vehicles, light logistics cargo carriers, and demountable shelters. Combat support configurations also include troop carriers, command and control, weapons mounted installation kit (WMIK), reconnaissance and battlefield ambulance. The vehicle has seating layouts accommodating from two to twelve occupants, with more space allocated mission systems and weapons fit.

As part of the recent upgrade Zephyr was equipped with extreme-duty nitrogen-based suspension, replacing airbag systems which were considered more vulnerable in combat. The MRU can accommodate a range of powertrain options, dependent on end user preference and specification. The power train elements including the cooling pack, engine, automatic transmission and transfer box are mounted on a quick change ‘cassette’ offering rapid access and removal. This permits main powertrain components to be removed for major repair of maintenance in about one hour. The high pressure sealed nitrogen strut unit features an integral damper and internal bump stop offering an intrinsically safe – and retained mobility failure mode. Additional features include fully integrated health and usage monitoring systems (HUMS) and the capability to support exportable power requirements. The new system, carries no additional weight penalty.The vehicle is sized to enable air transportability within C130 and above – or underslung below CH47. Depending on configuration and protection level, the three-axle variant is designed to meet and exceed improved medium mobility (IMM) criteria with a 4 tonne payload.


Zephyr Multi-Role Vehicle is offered in 4x4 and 6x6 armored, blast protected configurations. Photo: Creation UK

Copyright © 2011 Defense Update. All Rights Reserved.

buglerbilly
13-09-11, 02:10 PM
ST Engineering's Land Systems Arm Secures $68m Contract to Supply New Generation Spider Light Strike Vehicles

(Source: ST Engineering; issued Sept. 13, 2011)



SINGAPORE --- ST Engineering today announced that its land systems arm, ST Kinetics, has won a contract worth S$68m from the Singapore Ministry of Defence (MINDEF) through an international tender, to supply its new generation Spider Light Strike Vehicles (Spider LSV) and spares. Delivery is expected to take place over 2013-14.

Designed with a unique center drive configuration allowing for weapon systems to be mounted on both sides of the driver, the Spider LSV incorporates a state-of-the-art electronic controlled engine, a 4-speed automatic transmission and an enhanced suspension system capable of high cross-country manoeuverability. The Spider LSV has an increased seating capacity for a crew of six and is heli-portable.

"We are extremely pleased that MINDEF has selected the Spider LSV. This is an excellent testimony to ST Kinetics' continued focus to innovate through smart engineering, effective solutions to meet our customers' evolving operational needs," says SEW Chee Jhuen, President, ST Kinetics.

This contract is not expected to have any material impact on the consolidated net tangible assets per share and earnings per share of ST Engineering for the current financial year.

ST Kinetics (Singapore Technologies Kinetics Ltd) is the land systems and specialty vehicles arm of Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd. It delivers integrated land systems, specialty vehicles and their related through life support for defence, homeland security and commercial applications.

ST Engineering (Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd) is an integrated engineering group providing solutions and services in the aerospace, electronics, land systems and marine sectors. Headquartered in Singapore, the Group reported revenues of $5.98b in FY2010 and has more than 20,000 employees worldwide, with over 100 subsidiaries and associated companies in 24 countries and 45 cities.

-ends-

buglerbilly
13-09-11, 02:16 PM
KMW Presents New DINGO Version

(Source: Krauss Maffei Wegmann; issued Sept. 13, 2011)


Heavily protected wheeled vehicles form the most competitive segment of the army equipment market, attracting new products like the Dingo 2. (KMW photo)

LONDON/MUNICH --- Krauss-Maffei Wegmann (KMW), Europe's market leader for highly protected wheeled and tracked vehicles presented a newly developed and increased power-rated version of the DINGO 2 wheeled vehicle at the opening of the security exhibition DSEi in London today.

With already six nations (Germany, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Luxembourg, Norway and Austria) making use of the DINGO 2 in more than 15 versions, it has proven its worth in numerous international missions of the NATO, EU or United Nations. Especially in the Afghanistan missions, afflicted by terrorist attacks, the DINGO has repeatedly served as a life saver for its crew.

“KMW is known throughout the world for its powerful and highly protected military vehicles. With the new DINGO HD we are consequently continuing our product strategy, offering a product line with a broad variety of vehicles, all at the highest level of protection, to our international clients”, said Frank Haun, CEO and President of KMW.

Increased performance and higher payload

The new HD-version (Heavy Duty) offers a much higher payload of up to 3 tons, whilst the external dimensions remain the same as all other DINGO 2 vehicles. The gross vehicle weight was increased to 14,5 tons. It is based on a Unimog vehicle chassis with a 225kW, 6-cylinder engine and a fully automatic transmission. Hereby a large number of new and mission-specific versions can be created, whilst maintaining the known international protection concept.

The logistical concept of the DINGO 2 ties in perfectly with previously released DINGO versions. The user states can thereby guarantee a continuous and price efficient provisioning for the DINGO vehicle family.

DINGO 2 – the best protection for dangerous missions

Almost 1000 DINGOs in different versions, ranging from patrol and reconnaissance versions over mobile command posts to ambulance and NBC-reconnaissance versions, are in use with six European nations. The high level of protection has repeatedly proven its worth during numerous terrorist attacks and has always saved the lives of the crew members. The vehicles offer the soldiers the best protection available in the world combined with high mobility. The large payload allows a battle load capacity for patrols of several days duration.

The deployment under extreme climatic conditions is guaranteed through climate control and a protective ventilation system. For self-defence purposes the DINGO is equipped with a remote controlled light weapons station of the type FLW 100/FLW 200. the vehicle crew is thereby capable of operating the weapons station from within the protected interior. The stabilisation of the FLW allows gunfights even when the vehicle is in movement.

Krauss-Maffei Wegmann GmbH & Co. KG leads the European market for armoured wheeled and tracked vehicles. At locations in Germany, Brazil, Greece, the Netherlands, Singapore, Turkey and the USA some 3500 employees develop, manufacture and support a product portfolio ranging from air-transportable, heavily armoured wheeled vehicles through reconnaissance, antiaircraft and artillery systems to heavy battle tanks, infantry fighting vehicles and bridgelaying systems. The armed forces of more than 30 nations worldwide rely on tactical systems by KMW.

-ends-

buglerbilly
14-09-11, 02:41 AM
DSEi 2011: New alternator to give power boost to vehicles

September 13, 2011

ITT has been demonstrating a new alternator that delivers more than twice the electrical power to energy-thirsty vehicles.

The CRUX (Create, Regulate, Utilize, eXport) generator, on display at DSEi, is capable of producing 1,000 amps, allowing it to power the increasingly large number of electrical systems on modern military vehicles.

The system, developed from technology used on city buses, has been designed to be retrofitted on to a range of vehicles and installed by mechanics in a few hours.

Traditional vehicles alternators used on military vehicles, such as MRAPs, only produce 400 amps or 570 amps, but they only do this when the driver has their foot on the gas.

As Douglas Ramsey, IPS Business Lead at ITT's Integrated Power Systems division explained, vehicles in Afghanistan rarely get above a speed of 20 mph and actually spend much of their time on idle power at 5 mph, but still require high levels of electrical power to run systems like air conditioning, turrets and EO/IR systems.

'The curve of electrical requirements on some vehicles is growing exponentially,' said Ramsey, 'It's easy to imagine some electrical systems getting over taxed. CRUX also includes a regulator which smoothes the flow to a stable 28 volts DC so that delicate systems such as radios and jammers aren't affected.'

ITT has demonstrated the CRUX to the United States Marine Corps in the heat of Twentynine Palms in California in August.

The company says the generator earned high marks for fuel efficiency and power delivery during the demo.

During four days of testing, the CRUX generator ran continually for up to eight hours and consistently supplied high power output, while using less than a single tank of fuel.

Tony Osborne, London

buglerbilly
14-09-11, 04:26 AM
Clear Pic of the OCELOT-derived Special Forces version, so-called Weapons Variant proposed for the latest Phase of Project Redfin..............very nice looking vehicle BUT it makes me wonder what the Bushmaster variant originally proposed for Project Redfin could have been............perhaps Abe can clarify IF it looked similar?



Force Protection Europe is displaying here the new Ocelot Weapons Variant of the light protected patrol vehicle.
Photo: Tamir Eshel. Defense-Update

buglerbilly
14-09-11, 09:26 AM
Oshkosh Defense unveils Light Combat Vehicle

September 14, 2011



The next generation of light combat military vehicles require new levels of mobility and protection to operate effectively in remote, rugged and hostile landscapes. Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, designed the Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) to meet the military's future needs based on 10 years of operational experience with the military utilizing Oshkosh's heavy, medium and MRAP vehicle fleets in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The affordable Oshkosh L-ATV incorporates field-proven technologies, advanced armor solutions and expeditionary levels of mobility to redefine safety and performance standards for the US Armed Forces and international militaries. The L-ATV also is designed for future growth, with the ability to accept additional armor packages and technology upgrades as the mission requires.

"We designed the L-ATV to address the rapidly evolving threats and provide troops with greater ability to navigate through extreme driving conditions," said Ken Juergens, vice president and general manager of Joint Programs for Oshkosh Defense. "Battlefields have changed - threats are more dangerous, operating environments are more rugged and fuel efficiency is more important than ever. The state-of-the-art L-ATV is designed to meet these challenges, today and well into the future, just as our M-ATV continues to meet evolving battlefield threats without comprising its payload and off-road mission profile."

Equipped with the Oshkosh TAK-4iTM independent suspension system, the next generation of Oshkosh's TAK-4 suspension system, the L-ATV can safely navigate dangerous on- and off-road terrain while providing unmatched ride quality. The TAK-4i technology uses a proprietary technology to deliver 20 inches of independent wheel travel - 25 percent more wheel travel than any vehicle in the US military's fleets - and expands on the success of the TAK-4 system, which is currently fielded on more than 20,000 military-class vehicles.

The L-ATV's armored capsule is scalable and can accept multiple armor configurations to protect troops from IEDs and today's other prevalent battlefield threats. The capsule is optimized for protection, weight and mobility, and its modular and flexible design allows the vehicle to accept a greater range of upgrades and continuous enhancements.

The L-ATV's modern technology engine delivers expanded power capabilities, greater fuel efficiency and integrated communications for improved diagnostics and maintenance over legacy engine technologies currently fielded. An optional Oshkosh ProPulse diesel-electric hybrid powertrain has been developed, integrated and tested in the L-ATV, providing a powertrain option that can be readily implemented to maximize the vehicle's efficiency through improved fuel economy, high levels of exportable power (stationary and on the move) and lower life-cycle costs.

Hurrah! Finally............

As evidenced with the MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) production, when the company ramped up to exceed 1,000 vehicle deliveries per month, Oshkosh has robust manufacturing capabilities, proven expertise and is ready now to build the L-ATV cost effectively on-time and in the quantities needed, with flexibility for future growth. Oshkosh's flexible production capabilities and remanufacturing experience allow the company to quickly incorporate production changes or retrofit vehicles with additional armor or upgrades.



Source: Oshkosh Defense

buglerbilly
15-09-11, 05:37 AM
Wednesday, September 14, 2011, 10:17 PM

ACMAT presents at DSEI 2011 the new fast attack vehicle BASTION PATSAS.

The BASTION PATSAS is an open-top armoured fast attack vehicle, dedicated to long duration missions with heavy armament and high level communication equipment. The BASTION PATSAS is based on the BASTION APC which was unveiled at Eurosatory 2010.


BASTION PATSAS fast attack vehicle ACMAT French Defence Industry

The BASTION PATSAS is based on the rugged chassis of the VLRA light truck which provide high mobility. The crew compartment of the BASTION PATSAS provides high level protection against firing of small weapons level 2 and anti-mine protection level 2a and 2b.

With this new vehicle, ACMAT provides an unique and comprehensive solution to operating autonomously with a maximum level of tactical mobility and offensive power for Special Forces units.

The BASTION PATSAS is motorized with a 5.0 litre Turbo Diesel engine coupled to 6 or 5 speed manual gearbox. The BASTION PATSAS can be run at maximum road speed of 110 km/hr, with a maximum cruising range of 1.000 km.


BASTION APC

buglerbilly
15-09-11, 06:20 PM
DSEI 2011: Oshkosh readies L-ATV for launch

September 15, 2011

Oshkosh Defense plans to unveil its new Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) at the AUSA exhibition in Washington DC in October as it positions the vehicle for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programme.

Speaking at the DSEi exhibition in London, Kenneth Juergens, Oshkosh Defense vice president and general manager for joint programmes told Shephard that the company had incorporated elements of its MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) platform into the L-ATV design to bring cost savings through commonality.

‘It is a lighter vehicle than the M-ATV. In terms of JLTV it meets or exceeds the requirements for price, range and performance. We have already done 24,000 testing miles and are looking forward to unveiling it at AUSA,' Juergens said.

While it emerged earlier this week that the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee of Defense has recommended the termination of the JLTV project is its markup of the 2012 defence budget, Juergens echoed other executives at DSEi in being outwardly confident of its survival.

‘We are still expecting a draft RfP sometime in October and a full RfP to come out in January. This is a key programme for the army and the marine corps and they really want this to proceed,' Juergens said.

L-ATV incorporates the Oshkosh TAK-4i independent suspension system - an evolution of the system in the larger M-ATV - which uses proprietary technology to deliver 20 inches of independent wheel travel. The company claims this is 25% more wheel travel than any vehicle in the US military's fleets.

The vehicle's armoured capsule has been designed to be scalable and allows for a range of long-term upgrades.

Juergens said an optional Oshkosh ProPulse diesel-electric hybrid powertrain had been developed and tested on the vehicle.

Meanwhile, the company used DSEi to display an ambulance version of its M-ATV, which takes a range of litters and the all-mechanical design allows the loading of two patients in two minutes. A floating floor also provides more protection in the event of an IED attack.

Also on display was a soft-skin cab version of its Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) truck, which can be offered to export customers without any ITAR restrictions.

Tony Skinner, London

buglerbilly
16-09-11, 06:18 PM
JLTV Cut May Delay Humvee Upgrade

By Carlo Munoz

Published: September 16, 2011



The USA cancels JLTV then obviously we have to re-focus efforts for our own troops...................and what they propose for Hummer is NOT a simple update or recap, its a complete rebuild...........we don't have that option...........God forbid we buy more Mercs!

Washington: The Army may have to retool its plans to upgrade its Humvee fleet, if the proposed cancellation of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle is finalized.

Companies vying for the Army's Modernized Expanded Capacity Vehicle program had expected a draft proposals request from the Army to come out today. Last month, the service released an early list of requirements for the revamped combat truck.

But Wednesday's decision by the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee to cancel the Army and Marine Corps' Joint Light Tactical Vehicle in their version of the fiscal year 2012 defense bill could force the Army back to the drawing board for MECV.

The upgraded Humvees were expected pave the way for the JLTV's introduction into the fleet, while also providing U.S. soldiers with a bigger and tougher Humvee, Granite Tactical Vehicles President Chris Berman explained.

Granite has teamed up with Textron to compete for the MECV program.

But when members of the SAC-D killed the JLTV this week, due to cost growth and delays in the program, they also shifted the MECV effort from "a stopgap to a [full] solution," Bill Kisiah, vice president for advanced military vehicles at Textron, said.

"The services were looking to field a high-low capability mix with JLTV and recapped Humvees. If the high part of that mix goes away, Humvees may need to fill some of that capability gap," Eric Lindsey, a defense analyst with the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment, added.

To fill that gap, Army leaders may switch up the MECV program to squeeze more power and performance out of its new Humvees, Lindsey suggested, but noted there will be limits.

"There are constraints to what can be done with any vehicle, and a 30-year-old Humvee is certainly no exception," he said.

But Berman pointed out their Humvee already meets or exceeds most of what the services were looking for in JLTV, adding the Army and the Marines "should not accept anything less than that."

While it remains to be seen if JLTV cut will make it into the final FY12 defense bill -- House appropriators did not cancel the truck in their bill -- the Senate move "puts a lot more focus" on getting the MECV program going "sooner rather than later," Kisiah added.

But given the rising financial crunch DoD is now under, if House appropriators want to keep the JLTV alive, they will have to kill or dramatically reduce other programs to make it work, Lindsey said.

That said, "there's a decent chance that this is it for JLTV as we know it," he added.

While service leaders will want to see how much they can get out of the old Army warhorse, Berman suggested that factions inside DoD were pushing to ramp down requirements for the new Humvee.

According to Berman, some military officials want the Army to reduce the weight of the new Humvee, so it can be used easier during air assault operations. However, dropping the weight would mean trading off the vehicle's armor and other protective measures.

Decisions on where to go with the MECV, now that JLTV is more than likely out of the picture, could mean another slate of delays for the Humvee program.

When asked what those delays could mean for Granite and other MECV competitors, Kisiah pointed out the Army had planned to issue the draft RFP around this time last year. "We'll just keep going," he said.

buglerbilly
17-09-11, 03:30 AM
U.S. Humvee Recapitalization RfP Coming Soon

By MICHAEL HOFFMAN

Published: 16 Sep 2011 17:17

The u.s. Army will issue the competitive Humvee recapitalization's draft request for proposals (RfP) next week, Col. David Bassett, Army program manager for Tactical Vehicles, confirmed.

Army officials will release the draft RFP one week after the Senate Appropriation defense subcommittee recommended the Defense Department terminate the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program, originally meant to replace the Humvee fleet.

Army leaders plan to upgrade 60,000 to 100,000 Humvees, extending the life of the vehicle to 2030. The Marine Corps similarly plans to upgrade more than 3,000 of their Humvees. Defense analysts said the potential cancellation of JLTV could mean more Humvees fall under the program. The recapitalization program is aimed to provide Humvee passengers more protection while maintaining the truck's speed and agility.

The JLTV program isn't dead yet, as defense industry lobbyists will make their voices heard on Capitol Hill. Even if JLTV is canceled, as most defense analysts expect, the Army must remain focused on keeping costs down on the Humvee upgrade, Bassett said.

A ceiling for the per-vehicle cost of the Humvee upgrade has been set at $180,000. Any higher and the Army and Marine Corps will have to reconsider a replacement like JLTV.

"We don't want to be in a position where we are spending more to upgrade a Humvee than we would to replace that vehicle with an even more capable vehicle that we built from the ground up," Bassett said. "If it costs too much it doesn't make strategic sense. You're better off just replacing it."

The Army will host an industry day to receive feedback on the RFP two weeks after it is released, Bassett said.

Four major competitors have lined up for the recapitalization program, including a team of Textron Systems and Granite Tactical Vehicles, and industry teams led by AM General, BAE Systems and Oshkosh. AM General has built the Humvee since the Army first started fielding it in the 1980s.

buglerbilly
17-09-11, 03:32 AM
JLTV Loses More Support on Capitol Hill

By MICHAEL HOFFMAN

Published: 16 Sep 2011 19:54

Congress stuck the latest dagger in the ailing Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program when the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee recommended on Sept. 13 - to the surprise of few - the program be terminated leaving Army and Marine Corps officials to re-examine the future of their services' tactical vehicle fleets.

JLTV isn't dead yet as industry lobbyists will make their voices heard on Capitol Hill, but many inside the Pentagon have seen this coming as their focus has sharpened on the Humvee recapitalization program.

The House Appropriations defense subcommittee fired a warning shot when it recommended in July a $50 million cut from the JLTV program noting "the operational niche to be filled by the JLTV appears to be shrinking."

Sen. Daniel Inouye, D-Hawaii, the Senate Appropriations Committee chairman, went further on Sept. 13, declaring the service's need for the JLTV has evaporated during the panel's review of the Pentagon's 2012 budget proposal.

"The bill terminates the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program due to excessive cost growth and constantly changing requirements. The committee believes that alternatives exist today to meet the Army and Marine Corps' requirements to recapitalize and competitively upgrade the Humvee fleet, and supports funding for those programs,"

The Defense Department's initial goal to replace the Humvee fleet with the JLTV has shrunk since the program's start to a more meager objective of fielding 50,000 JLTVs for the Army - or one-third of the service's Humvee fleet - and 5,000 more for the Marine Corps.

Col. David Bassett, Army program manager for Tactical Vehicles, said the services must continue to work to deliver the JLTV until legislation is finalized despite the defense subcommittee's black mark. He pointed to the progress the Army and Marine Corps have made to agree on a common set of requirements.

"I believe we're at a point where the requirements changes that we've made which I'd describe as adjustments not whole sale changes, We're at the point now where both services have come together and agreed on a requirement and are ready to proceed on the next phase of the program," Bassett said.

However, the Senate panel pointed to the service's inability to maintain a consistent set of requirement caused costs to soar as a reason the program's downfall.

"The inability to keep program requirements stable has resulted in significant cost growth early in the program's development phase, and projected acquisition costs will make the program unaffordable in this challenging economic environment," according to the report that accompanies the 2012 defense appropriations bill.

One Army source said he is worried the congressional staffs didn't receive full briefings on the progress made by both services on a common set of requirements. Army and Marine Corps officials will continue to answer Congress' question about the program and why the services need JLTV, Bassett said.

Cutting the number of JLTVs the Army and Marine Corps wanted to field from original proposals worked against the services in the eyes of the defense subcommittee. Replacing only a third of the Humvee fleet would only add to, "instead of reducing the service's logistics burden," according to the report.

The defense appropriations bill recommends transferring $20 million earmarked for the JLTV program to the competitive Humvee recapitalization program to "allow the services to rapidly field light tactical vehicles with greater capabilities sooner and at a lower cost," according to the report.

Pressure remains for the Army and Marine Corps to deliver an affordable Humvee upgrade even if JLTV disappears as analysts expect.

"I would offer that recapitalizing the Humvees still makes sense for the Army to keep costs very closely in mind as we go through that process so whatever we end up with still has to survive the logical scrutiny of, does it make sense to upgrade this vehicle, or should we really be looking to replace it to achieve the capability of what both services need," Bassett said.

The Army program manager said he expected the service to issue the draft RfP for the Humvee recapitalization the week of Sept. 19-23 with an industry day two weeks after it is issued.

Like other modernization programs, Loren Thompson, an analyst at the Lexington Institute in Arlington, Va., said JLTV got in trouble when the individual vehicle cost rose to heights too tough to stomach.

Government Accountability Office officials estimated the base vehicle cost grew to $350,000 per vehicle - a price tag unacceptable in this austere budgetary environment, Thompson said.

Army and Marine Corps leaders hoping to modernize their vehicle fleets must perform a balancing act as the services reset fleets worn by 10 years of war. Shrinking budgets have forced officials to make a hard sell, emphasizing significant upgrades for modernization programs like JLTV, the Ground Combat Vehicle and the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle.

However, Army and Marine Corps leaders have struggled to justify steep price tags for vehicles whose capabilities don't far exceed their predecessors. Both services are sitting on the cusp of a technology breakthrough such as an affordable hybrid drive, but they're still not there yet, said Jim Carafano, a former Army officer and defense analyst with the Heritage Foundation.

"There are potential technologies that could change things but they're not quite there yet," Carafano said.

buglerbilly
19-09-11, 12:46 PM
Army Preparing to Produce JLTVs, Recapped Humvees



That's a heavily-stripped JLTV slung underneath that Chinook............................:doh

Final hurrah for the JLTV?

Washington - After refining requirements during a two-year technology development phase for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, Army developers are poised to conduct full and open competitions geared towards recapping Humvees and producing JLTVs, as part of a synergized Light Tactical Vehicles strategy.

The Army-led program is planning to accelerate the developmental timeline of the next phase of the JLTV program, said Col. David Bassett, project manager, tactical vehicles.

"We're in the process of restructuring an acquisition strategy that responds to a shorter timeframe for these vehicles to be able to reduce the cost of the next phase as well as get vehicles out there faster," Bassett said. "We're going to deliver vehicles into the field sooner and we are working hand-in-hand with our user community to look at ways to drive down the cost of the vehicle."

The TD phase for the JLTV program, completed this past May, successfully demonstrated the vehicle's ability to meet a wide range of requirements. These requirements included fortified improvised explosive device protections designed to withstand blast attacks, off-road mobility, variable ride height suspension, exportable power and essential command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities, said Tim Goddette, director of sustainment Systems.

The TD phase further illustrated that the JLTV will be a next-generation light vehicle that brings Soldiers an unprecedented blend of protection, payload and performance, Goddette said. The 27-month TD phase included prototype vehicles from three teams of vendors: BAE-Navistar, Lockheed-BAE and General Tactical Vehicles (General Dynamics and AM General).

"The purpose of the TD phase was geared toward refining the requirements in order to demonstrate the JLTV's ability to meet the designated capability gaps," Goddette said. "The program has succeeded in identifying and proving out those areas of needed development -- and now the Army is analyzing what trade-offs might be required in order to best pursue an acquisition strategy that both lowers costs and delivers this needed capability to Soldiers."

The competitive prototyping and extensive testing pursued during the TD phase was designed to match technological capability with the vehicle's requirements as well as lower risk for an anticipated production phase.

"We demonstrated not only that the requirements were achievable, but we gained valuable insight into the cost of each capability and effect that one capability might have on another. We've learned that some trade-offs are necessary to pursue an overall strategy that best synchronizes requirements, resources, mature technologies and a cost-reducing acquisition strategy," Goddette said.

Operating in today's more budget-constrained fiscal environment, Army developers are working on an approach to JLTV procurement that harnesses the best available technologies while minimizing costs and achieving efficiency in the process.

One such approach includes the possibility of buying less add-on armor, known as B-kits, for the vehicles. Not every JLTV will need the added protection and new, lightweight materials may likely become available in the future.

With its off-road ability, blast-protection and on-board electronics, the JLTV will bring a new set of capabilities to the Army and Marines. The JLTV is being engineered to maximize Soldier protection without compromising mobility and vehicle performance.

"We are now focusing on a vehicle that is 10,000 pounds lighter than an M-ATV and yet we believe will offer as much protection as the original M-ATVs that the Army fielded," said Col. Bassett. These enhanced technological capabilities will allow the JLTV to perform a wide range of missions and perform many roles Humvees are currently unable to do.

At the same time the Army is preparing for the next phase of the JLTV program, they have also embarked upon a competitive Humvee recap program-called the Modernized Expanded Capability Vehicle. The MECV aims to improve the survivability of the existing Humvee that is already in the Army inventory.

The Army plans to release a draft request for proposal for MECV this fall, with an award date notionally slated for next spring.

Thus far, the Army has been encouraged by a strong industry response to earlier requests for information, and plans to award multiple test vehicle contracts before down-selecting to one vendor.

Currently, the Army estimates nearly 6,000 Humvees will be recapped as part of the program; with the potential for additional vehicles should the Marine Corps become part of the program. Both services, the Army and the Marine Corps, continue to review requirements to determine the extent of the collaboration needed.

The MECV program, which aims to improve survivability of the Humvee while driving down weight and cost, does have the requirement for the base cab to be lift-able by the Army's CH-47 Chinook helicopter, Bassett added.

Light Tactical Vehicle Strategy

The JLTV and Humvee-recap program are designed to complement one another as part of an integrated Light Tactical Vehicle strategy designed to best prepare American forces for a range of anticipated future contingencies.

"These two competitive efforts are also synchronized with one another to invest a limited amount of resources up front enabling a 'try before we buy' approach and capitalize on the vast experience our industry partners have gained over that past five years," Goddette added.

There are limits to how much payload and performance we can squeeze even out of an upgraded Humvee without resulting in a vehicle cost where it just makes common sense to buy a JLTV, Bassett said, "these two efforts together give us the best of both options as we seek to modernize our light fleet while sustaining our significant investment in HMMWV".

By Kris Osborn

(Kris Osborn writes for the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology)

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news/38236/Army_Preparing_to_Produce_JLTVs,_Recapped_Humvees. htm#ixzz1YOjVSrnF

buglerbilly
20-09-11, 12:22 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

Humvee Draft RFP Out

Posted by Paul McLeary at 9/19/2011 10:55 AM CDT



A few weeks back, Col. David Bassett, the U.S. Army’s project manager for tactical vehicles, told me that a draft RFP for the Humvee Recap program would come out “within the next few weeks.” Well, it’s here.

There’s a lot of drama surrounding the refitting of anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 Humvees, which has become all tied up with the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program and the issues that vehicle is going through. Earlier this year, Congress stripped $50 million from the JLTV program and shifted the funds to the Humvee, and last week a Senate committee, citing “excessive cost growth,” recommended the cancellation of the program. Chairman Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) said in a statement: “The committee believes that alternatives exist today to meet the Army and Marine Corps’ requirements to recapitalize and competitively upgrade the Humvee fleet, and supports funding for those programs.”

So far, we know that Textron and Granite Tactical Vehicles have combined to submit a bid to the Army (read this excellent George Packer piece in the New Yorker about that effort), and Humvee maker AM General is also in. BAE and Oshkosh are also expected to submit bids.

Speaking of Humvees, taking a quick trip through the dense language in the draft RFP, I noticed that one of the electronics systems it expects to be able to support is the Boomerang, a vehicle-mounted sniper-detection system that Raytheon’s BBN Technologies has been providing to U.S. forces since 2004. At the DSEi show in London last week, BBN announced that it signed a deal to provide the U.K. Ministry of Defense with a version of the system. I asked BBN’s David Schmitt about the deal, and he said the company made no “major changes” to it for the Brits, and that British soldiers are already using it in Afghanistan.

After picking up the sound of an incoming round, Boomerang alerts the crew inside the cab to the azimuth, range and elevation of the shooter. Schmitt added that his company is talking with several other NATO allies about obtaining the force-protection system. Earlier this year, the Boomerang was also integrated with the active Crosshairs RPG defeat system, and proved successful in Darpa and U.S. Army training. Plans call for sending the system to Afghanistan later this year.

buglerbilly
20-09-11, 02:07 PM
BAE Systems to Provide Critical Mine Protection for Soldiers

(Source: BAE Systems; issued September 19, 2011)





These are Iraqi Army vehicles.................

ARLINGTON, Virginia --- BAE Systems recently received a $9 million contract from U.S. Army TACOM to produce and deliver nine 2nd generation International Light Armored Vehicles (ILAV). The ILAV is a 4x4 v-shaped hull, mine protected vehicle used in several countries to fulfill a variety of roles.

Under this foreign military sales contract, BAE Systems will provide six ILAV Explosive Ordnance Disposal variants and three ILAV Interrogator Arm variants. The company will also supply repair parts for the fleet of Interrogator Arm variants.

Work on this contract began in August and is anticipated to be complete in May 2012. A significant portion of the work will be performed by Force Protection Industries, Inc. and Spartan Chassis. Work will also be performed at BAE Systems’ facilities in Aiken, S.C. and York, Pa.

Since 2006, more than 700 ILAVs have been produced and delivered to U.S. and foreign allies. The ILAV has five variants which include: International Light Armored Vehicle (base vehicle), Interrogator Arm, Explosive Ordnance Disposal, Joint Surrogate Vehicle and MRAP Training.

-ends-

buglerbilly
21-09-11, 01:58 AM
German Army orders 31 MUNGO 2 vehicles

September 20, 2011



I'm quietly astonished they've bought more of these as they didn't have a very good reputation in Afghanistan not least because they are too light to be reasonably IED resistant nor very good on rough terrain (too low ground clearance, low & long hull and the wheels are too small, hit a bump and you are grounded)

Krauss-Maffei Wegmann (KMW), Europe´s market leader for highly protected wheeled and tracked vehicles, has received an order from the German Army for the assembly and delivery of 31 further MUNGO 2 Multi-purpose vehicles for the Special Operations Division (DSO). The first three pre-series prototypes were delivered and qualified technically and tactically in an operational test. The delivery of another 31 vehicles will be completed until 2013.

As all other vehicles of the MUNGO family of air-portable vehicles, with its small size and low overall weight the MUNGO 2 Multi-purpose was specifically developed for transportation on a CH-53 transport helicopter. With its universal hydraulics and transport system this multi-purpose version is particularly suitable for the mission-specific transport of munitions, fuel, maintenance and NBC- decontamination equipment. A quick-change system for front mounting implements additionally enables the deployment of engineering systems. With a payload of up to 1.5 tons the MUNGO 2 Multi-purpose can additionally transport supply or armament in trailer operations.

Tailored specifically to the requirements of highly-mobile air-portable forces and built on the system criteria of the MUNGO-family, the MUNGO 2 Multi-purpose additionally convinces through a chassis optimized in continuous improvement for special missions, for example in Afghanistan.

In addition, the vehicle is perfectly protected against ballistic, mine and IED threats. Fully armoured and separated from the chassis, the floor provides along with a safety cell maximum protection for the two-headed crew.

Until now KMW has delivered more than 400 MUNGO in the three different versions - troop transporters, multi-purpose vehicles and large space cabins - to the German Army.

Source: KMW

buglerbilly
23-09-11, 01:05 AM
Creation UK secures combined Saudi Arabia deal for Zephyr Multi-Role Vehicle (MRV)



United Kingdom: Wednesday, 21st September 2011 --[ASDWire]-- Saudi Arabia has been confirmed as the first overseas country to order and buy into Creation’s Zephyr protected vehicle programme. The deal, which establishes a partnership between Penman Group and ERAF Industries, part of Fahad International Company Limited, was finalised during the DSEi Show in London earlier this month. The partnership involves a significant element of technology transfer and will include the establishment of a new in-country operation which will develop and jointly manufacture the Creation Zephyr MRV family of vehicles for tri-service applications in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ERAF Industries is Saudi Arabia’s leading armoured vehicle upgrade and remanufacturing specialist – and the development marks the inauguration of its expansion into full vehicle construction.

Initial stages will focus on the 4x4 MRV in a number of configurations, with the 6x6 variants to follow in 2012. Work has already commenced on the project and a pilot vehicle, which will incorporate a number of specific features and regional requirements, is scheduled to be delivered before the end of this year. Precise details of the contract and its value are not being disclosed.

Penman Group Managing Director, Bryan Findlay says, “When we acquired the business, design and intellectual property rights of Creation early in 2011, we recognised the Zephyr vehicle’s potential as a world market product, not least because of its modular design and thus suitability for manufacture and assembly in local markets. Many countries now wish to invest, develop and support their local economies and indigenous industries. The knowledge transfer element of this contract is indicative of Saudi Arabia’s world leadership and ambition to strengthen its skills and manufacturing capability for the future – and we are very proud to be a partner in that process”.

Abdullah Al Ameel, Chairman of Fahad International Company says, “The Zephyr is a fine example of the type of world class design engineering and technology which the United Kingdom has been able to provide for our country over many years. It fits well alongside our company’s established portfolio of defence products and of course, there is important added value to be gained for all of us through the associated knowledge transfer programme”.

Creation’s Zephyr MRV protected platform programme is an integral part of Penman’s future group-wide capability – and the latest upgrade variant made its debut at DSEi. The upgrade has also opened up the programme to develop to its full scope and potential. The original Zephyr design concept envisaged a fully functional rolling mine resistant underframe, onto which a wide variety of protected, softskin or even demountable top cabs, citadels or structures could be integrated. To date, development and production ready units have been configured around typical protected patrol vehicle requirements, whilst concurrent full design and pre-production studies have included a wide range of other applications.

Throughout its design evolution, the Zephyr has featured a composite ‘occupant survival cell’ with surrounding protection including a V-form belly plate and an integral blast mitigation system. Variants of the Zephyr can be configured for operational roles, body types and specialist applications such as pick-up utility vehicle, light logistics cargo carrier, troop carrier, command and control, demountable shelter, weapons mounted installation kit (WMIK), reconnaissance and battlefield ambulance. Crew and seating layouts can be varied and space is also allocated for weapons fit, communications suites, situational awareness (SA) systems and other electronic devices.

Specifically with world markets in mind, the mine resistant under-frame is also designed to accommodate a range of powertrain options, dependent on end user preference and specification. In addition, the unit has been developed to incorporate a rapid access and removal ‘cassette’ mounting for the cooling pack, engine, automatic transmission and transfer box. This permits main powertrain components to be removed for major repair and maintenance in about an hour.
The latest Zephyr MRVs feature Creation’s new, extreme-duty nitrogen-based suspension all round, which improves roll-stiffness and provides further potential for payload growth. The new system, which carries no additional weight penalty, completely replaces the previous airbag based system, which was considered to be potentially vulnerable to small arms fire and damage in hostile operating conditions.

Hampshire-based Creation’s Zephyr programme began almost five years ago as its privately funded initiative to develop an upgrade and protection package for in-service and legacy fleet vehicles. Its design team quickly recognised the sector’s need for a fundamentally new, radical and fully integrated approach to wheeled protected vehicle engineering. Concepts, projects and design assignments such as the in-house Zephyr, the Lockheed Martin AVA and the Ranger for Universal Engineering then followed, all of which incorporate creative engineering features which subsequently have been widely adopted. More recently, the company has completed designs for other international clients and its subsystems projects, such as the LifeSeat One blast seat, have won critical acclaim.

-ends-

buglerbilly
23-09-11, 01:57 AM
Oshkosh Gets Heavy On New Combat Tow Truck

By Carlo Munoz

Published: September 22, 2011



Washington: The fleet of up-armored, bomb-resistant vehicles DoD flooded onto the battlefield in recent years has saved the lives of untold numbers of American soldiers.

Trucks like the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle and the up-armored Humvee have given U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan a significant edge. But getting these massive trucks off the field once they have been hit has become a difficult and sometimes deadly task.

If an MRAP or up-armored Humvee is hit by an improvised explosive devices or rocket-propelled grenade, the crew may be able to walk away unscathed, but the vehicle will likely be reduced to a smoldering pile of twisted metal.

Hauling the wreckage back to base can require calling in a number of other heavy vehicles to help out. But it also means leaving the convoy exposed in dangerous and hostile terrain, while waiting for those support trucks to arrive.

Since IED and RPG attacks can be used by insurgents to set up ambushes on American patrols in Afghanistan and before in Iraq, waiting for help to arrive could quickly turn into a firefight.

However, the engineers at Oshkosh Defense are looking to change all that, with their newest tactical wheeled vehicle.

The company's Heavy Recovery System will be able to retrieve all Class I and II MRAPs, as well as other large vehicles like Strykers, Bradleys and Humvees, according to a Oshkosh statement released today.

Aside from being able to pull Army and Marine Corps trucks off the field and back to base, the HRV will also be able to withstand the same kinds of threats the vehicles they are retrieving can.

Oshkosh team members plan to roll out a prototype version of the HRS at the Modern Day Marine trade show at Marine Corps headquarters in Quantico, VA next week, according to the company's statement.

buglerbilly
27-09-11, 01:10 PM
Ceradyne Debuts HMMWV RECAP Candidate at Modern Day Marine


Source / copyright : Ceradyne, Inc.

Costa Mesa, Calif.-September 26, 2011 --[ASDWire]-- Ceradyne, Inc. (NASDAQ: CRDN) announced the completion of an advanced technology HMMWV (High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle) RECAP prototype that has been completed by Ceradyne Vehicle Armor Systems and Gravikor in a team effort to incorporate a spaceframe design.

Ceradyne Vehicle Armor Systems, in conjunction with their Team Partner Gravikor will be displaying a technologically advanced version of a HMMWV RECAP candidate at the Modern Day Marine Exhibition in Quantico, VA. on September 27-29, 2011. The prototype incorporates an advanced spaceframe design for a vehicle crew cab providing the versatility to scale the armor application to the mission.

Capable of going from traditional canvas doors to a full "Frag Kit" protection level, this solution also incorporates a blast shield of advanced materials under the crew cab. The combination allows the Marine Corps to recapture the full weight savings needed to insure expeditionary amphibious operations and long term storage aboard ships.

Marc King, President of Ceradyne Armor Systems, explains: "This is the only solution currently available for evaluation that accommodates the concept of "scalable armor" allowing the end user to match the crew protection level with the mission. If no armor or just a light armor application is needed, the spaceframe technology provided on the HMMWV chassis will accommodate it. If the battle field threat is more lethal, the crew can increase the level of protection by changing the armor solution applied to the frame. As better, lighter, more cost effective armors are developed in the future; they can be accommodated as well."

Source : Ceradyne, Inc.

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news/38441/Ceradyne_Debuts_HMMWV_RECAP_Candidate_at_Modern_Da y_Marine.htm#ixzz1Z9bUCnPB

buglerbilly
28-09-11, 01:24 AM
For a high definition, very large image of this vehicle look here................armoured pillbox on wheels with a Hummer bonnet............

http://www.asdwire.com/data/images/ID8641_1_Unscaled.jpg

buglerbilly
28-09-11, 04:00 AM
Tuesday, September 27, 2011, 11:19 AM

Future of military vehicle capabilities from Oshkosh Defense on display at Modern Day Marine 2011

Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE:OSK), will showcase a range of cutting edge vehicle platforms and technologies to serve the U.S. Marine Corps in its exhibit at Modern Day Marine 2011 in Quantico, Va.


Oshkosh Defense LCTV Light Combat Tactical Vehicle

The Oshkosh Light Combat Tactical Vehicle (LCTV) will be on display at the show. Designed to demonstrate the future of light tactical vehicle technologies – including improved off-road mobility and exportable power capabilities – the LCTV has been independently developed and tested by Oshkosh Defense.

The vehicle completed the Tecate SCORE Baja 1000 off-road race in the Mexican desert in 2010. Lessons learned during the race and feedback from the field have advanced the development of technologies available to the Marine Corps today, including Oshkosh offerings for upgrading the HMMWV fleet.


HMMWV using Oshkosh Defense TAK-4® independent suspension

“Oshkosh Defense has developed industry-leading mobility and protection solutions for the Marine Corps’ heavy and medium fleets for years, and we are expanding our efforts with extensive R&D work to bring the light fleets up to a new level of performance,” said John Bryant, vice president and general manager of Marine Corps Programs for Oshkosh Defense.

“We’ve developed an upgraded HMMWV using our battle-tested TAK-4® independent suspension system to give Marines improved mobility, survivability and ride quality.”


Oshkosh Defense MTVR Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement cargo truck

Oshkosh also will exhibit its innovations with exportable power solutions to meet the increasing energy demands of modern military equipment, in accordance with the DoD Operational Energy Strategy. A Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement (MTVR) with On-Board Vehicle Power (OBVP), which can export up to 120 kW of military-grade power and reduce the need for generators, will also be on display.

The MTVR with OBVP can deliver enough energy to power a command center, city block or small airport, and is currently in testing with Marines.


Oshkosh Defense MTVR 16.5 Ton load handling system 8x8 truck

Vehicles and Advanced Technologies on Display

- The Oshkosh LCTV technology demonstrator

- Oshkosh’s upgraded HMMWV, equipped with the Oshkosh TAK-4 independent suspension system

- The MTVR with OBVP

- An MTVR 8x8 with Load Handling System (LHS) featuring a 16.5 ton payload capacity and steering rear axles for improved maneuverability

- In an outdoor display, the Oshkosh Heavy Recovery System (HRS) technology demonstrator will showcase new performance, mobility and protection for U.S. Armed Forces’ recovery vehicle fleets. Oshkosh Defense developed the HRS based on the proven Logistics Vehicle Replacement System (LVSR) platform and cutting edge wrecker technology from Jerr-Dan, an Oshkosh Corporation company

buglerbilly
28-09-11, 02:33 PM
Wednesday, September 28, 2011, 02:31 PM

Russian Company Industry Arzamas Engineering Plant unveils BTR-82A and Tigr-6A APC vehicles.

Experts from the Russian Defence Industry Arzamas Engineering Plant have unveiled their brand-new Tigr-6A light armored truck and BTR-82-A armored personnel carrier.


Russian Tigr-6A wheeled armoured vehicle personnel carrier

The developers say the revamped Tigr-6A armored vehicle is the largest Russian-made off-road vehicle to date. Although the Tigr-6A was designed in 2010, the Russian Army has yet to adopt it.

The new Tigr-6A features double-layer special-steel armor and additional Kevlar-type protection against fragmentation munitions.

Russian BTR-82A wheeled armoured vehicle personnel carrier


The BTR-82 and BTR-82A are an upgraded version of the BTR-80 and BTR-80A wheeled armored vehicles.

The BTR-82 wheeled armored vehicle features energy absorbing structures, a more powerful diesel engine developing 300-hp of power, crew and passengers special suspension seats, a sophisticated fire suppression system, reinforced floor protection against mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs), higher rate of firepower, improved ballistic protection, command, increased survivability by 20 percent, reliability and mobility.

Video New BTR-82A and Tigr-6A Russian wheeled armoured vehicle



Uploaded by armyreco on Sep 28, 2011
Experts from the Russian Defence Industry Arzamas Engineering Plant have unveiled their brand-new Tigr-6A armored truck and BTR-82-A armored personnel carrier. (Read more at http://www.armyrecognition.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&... )

buglerbilly
29-09-11, 03:30 AM
United Arab Emirates Preparing To Buy M-ATVs

Posted by Military Times Online | September 29th, 2010 | Uncategorized

By KATE BRANNEN — Significant foreign military sales are in the works for the lightest-weight MRAP variant built by Oshkosh, including a sale to the United Arab Emirates, according to the company.

The UAE is looking to buy the Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV), said John Bryant, vice president and general manager for Marine Corps programs at Oshkosh. The M-ATV was developed to meet an urgent operational request from U.S. combat forces in Afghanistan. There are currently 8,108 vehicles on contract with Oshkosh for the U.S. military.

In addition to the UAE, there are two other foreign military sales being worked, including an urgent requirement, Bryant said. Oshkosh expects to wrap up production of the first 8,108 vehicles by the beginning of November, allowing the company to address the needs of other countries, he said.

More U.S. contracts also seem likely.

The Pentagon is working a joint urgent operational needs statement for an M-ATV-like ambulance, according to Lt. Col. Coll Haddon, program manager for M-ATV. And Oshkosh believes the U.S. Marine Corps has a need for a reconnaissance variant, Bryant said.

Bryant said he is also confident that the U.S. military’s requirement for the first configuration of the vehicle, what’s being shipped now to Afghanistan, will also grow.

The M-ATV contract was awarded to Oshkosh on June 30, 2009. By December, the first unit was equipped, 159 days after the contract award. Now, there are more than 5,000 of the vehicles operating in Afghanistan.

buglerbilly
29-09-11, 03:35 AM
A low profile, armored pick-up truck: can you say special operations?

Posted by Gina Cavallaro | September 28th, 2010 | Modern Day Marine


Ceradyne Armor System's low profile armored pick up truck.

Supposedly already in use but not, obviously, by regular army.............

If you were at a traffic stop next to Ceradyne Armor Systems’ black Ford F350 in downtown Quantico, you’d never know it’s armored. It’s a sleek street vehicle with secrets.

At 350 pounds each, the front doors are as light as feathers compared with other, earlier armor kits with doors that weigh up to 600 pounds. Just swing the doors closed with a pinky finger.

And, there are no after-market parts. If it breaks , you call Ford.

Ceradyne uses composite, steel composite and ceramic composite components, the same materials it uses on the tactical vehicles driven by U.S. and NATO troops.

buglerbilly
30-09-11, 01:33 AM
Army, Corps settle on requirements to save JLTV

Posted by Michael Hoffman | September 29th, 2011 | Modern Day Marine


Marine Corps officials plan to buy 5,500 Joint Light Tactical Vehicles to replace a portion of their Humvee fleet. (USMC photo)

Even as Congress is writing reports recommending the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program be killed, the Marine Corps’ Program Executive Officer for Land Systems said “JLTV may be within reach.”

However, much has changed in the past two months for JLTV. The Marine Corps and Army have since agreed to a common set of requirements this summer as the Army completed the two-year technology development phase for the joint program.

The Marine Corps and Army hope to replace portions of their Humvee with the JLTV although many defense analysts have marked the program for cancellation as costs have risen and requirements have spiraled out of control. The Corps plans to buy 5,500 JLTVs.

Taylor admitted he didn’t know if the U.S. could afford the JLTV before the Corps and Army made up major ground on requirements over the past two months.

“Both services have confidence that there’s a path to a reasonably affordable vehicle with a reasonable price tag,” he said.

Progress made in the technology development phase will also mean the Army and Marine Corps could deliver the JLTV faster, resulting in “hundreds of millions of dollars in savings,” Taylor said.

Taylor said he doesn’t blame Congress for its harsh judgment of the program because he had similar concerns heading into this summer.

He said both services are ready to brief their progress to Capitol Hill and the Pentagon.

“We’re just coming off that sea change to where now we can finally come up for air to better inform [the Office of the Secretary of Defense] and the Hill,” he said.

buglerbilly
30-09-11, 02:29 AM
Army Breaks Humvee Recap Plan Into Two Phases

By Carlo Munoz

Published: September 29, 2011



Washington: The Army is breaking in half its massive plan to revamp its Humvee fleet, giving industry two separate shots to lock in a part of the multimillion-dollar program.

In the end, the Army will produce nearly 5,800 modified Humvees at a rate of three to four vehicles a day, under the Modernized Expanded Capability Vehicle (MECV) program, according to an executive summary of the program issued by Army Contracting Command.

The MECV effort is the Army's plan to make the iconic combat truck that has carried American troops and equipment into battle since 1989, bigger, tougher and meaner.

The competition will be carried out in two phases. The first phase will focus on modifying the "armament carrier" version of the truck. The remaining Humvee variants will be covered in the second phase, which include command and control and anti-tank versions of the truck, according to the summary.

The ground service will compete both phases of the MECV program separately, awarding individual contracts for both phase one and phase two, it states.

For the first phase, the Army plans to hand out up to three research and development deals and then downselect to a single contractor once the program moves into the production phase by fiscal year 2013.

On the second phase, the Army will open up an entirely new competition but only allow the original three contractors chosen for the first phase to take a shot at it.

Under this plan, the winner of the first phase will likely lock up a deal to modify the remaining Humvees included the second phase.

The Army expects to issue a proposals request for those first phase development contracts next month and select the three contractors by next May.

Humvee builder AM General, a Textron-Granite Tactical team and Navistar, which builds a version of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle, will likely be the top contenders for the MECV program.

The request for proposals for the first phase of the MECV program had been expected to come out earlier this month. Now, the planned October release of the RFP has some speculating whether the delay was tied to efforts on Capitol Hill to cancel the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle.

The upgraded Humvees were expected pave the way for the JLTV's introduction into the fleet, while also providing U.S. soldiers with a bigger and tougher Humvee, Granite Tactical Vehicles President Chris Berman told me last month.

But when members of the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee killed the JLTV, due to cost growth and delays in the program, they also shifted the MECV effort from "a stopgap to a [full] solution," according to Bill Kisiah, vice president for advanced military vehicles at Textron.

buglerbilly
30-09-11, 11:44 AM
Mission command platform enables freedom of maneuver on battlefield

September 27, 2011

By Amy Walker, PEO C3T









ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (Sept. 27, 2011) -- To increase the accuracy and speed of decisions made on the most critical points of the battlefield, the Army is providing Soldiers with the same mission command capabilities in a mobile platform that they have at their home base.

"With Mission Command On the Move we are transitioning from having Soldiers be tethered to their Tactical Operations Centers in order to receive the common operating picture to enabling them to place themselves at the most critical points on the battlefield while still leveraging all of the same mission command capabilities," said Lt. Col. Carl J. Hollister, product manager for Command Post Systems and Integration.

In support of theater-generated Operational Needs Statements, or ONS, product manager for Command Post Systems and Integration, known as PdM CPS&I, which is assigned to Project Manager Warfighter Information Network-Tactical, or PM WIN-T, has provided MCOTM capabilities to Afghanistan and Iraq. The ONS process allows urgent requests from theater for equipment or resources to be identified and rapidly fielded.

Nine Caiman mine-resistant, ambush-protected, or MRAP, platforms were provided in support of ONS in Iraq this year and four Stryker platforms were deployed to Afghanistan in support of an ONS generated by one of the Stryker brigades.

"Mission Command On the Move provides Soldiers with many of the same capabilities resident in the fixed command post, as well as the necessary wideband throughput enabling them to execute the art of battle command on-the-move or at-the-quick-halt from any vantage point," said Lt. Col. Terry Wilson, former PdM for CPS&I. Wilson has since taken the position as Research, Development and Engineering Command III Corps' Science and Technology Officer.

MCOTM -- a mission command equipment package -- is integrated into Bradley, Stryker and MRAP platforms. It enables the Soldier to be present at the decisive point on the battlefield, provides the relevant Common Operational Picture, or COP, and enables situational awareness while on-the-move. It is designed to support mobile mission command requirements for corps, division and brigade level, but more recently it has been pushed down to the battalion level.

MCOTM provides both line-of-sight (terrestrial) and beyond-line-of-sight (satellite) communications, which means that in places like Afghanistan where the terrain doesn't always support terrestrial communications, the Soldiers will not lose critical capabilities.

"In high-intensity conflicts, Mission Command On The Move will allow the Soldier to stay ahead of the enemy because he is receiving and pushing out information faster and with greater accuracy," said Maj. Michael Williams, assistant PdM for MCOTM.

The CPS&I team has actually recreated the way the Army fields mobile mission command. Back in 2008, two weeks after the product office had been awarded Mobile Battle Command On-The-Move, or MBCOTM, the Army terminated the program, but the requirement to provide that capability to Soldiers still remained, Wilson said.

PdM CPS&I has been able to transition the old MBCOTM program so that it executes the new Mission Command On The Move, or MCOTM, systems through the ONS process. When the ONS inevitably started to come through, the team utilized the lessons-learned from the previous program to fill the requirements in an efficient, cost effective manner. The team was able to utilize the work of other organizations to build the needed integrated mobile mission command capabilities, Wilson said.

"Because we were able to achieve this level of integration and reliability, those platforms are in theatre right now and have recently received accolades from ATEC (Army Test and Evaluation Command) Operational Assessment," Wilson said. "It has been a real success story."

The fielding of the four MCOTM Stryker platforms in Afghanistan began as an ONS for a single mission command vehicle, but PdM CPS&I was able to leverage preexisting assets and provide four platforms for a more complete response. Until this particular effort, the organization had only provided these capabilities to brigade and above echelons, but for the first time the mission command platform was pushed down to the battalion level.

In Iraq's Operation New Dawn, the MCOTM platforms are being used to assist in the drawdown efforts. As forward operating bases, or FOBs, are in the process of shutting down, the platforms are being used to fill the gap in communication assets, running operations while the TOCs are being disassembled.

"It's the last vehicle at the FOB, and once the FOB closes, they just drive it right out," Williams said.

MCOTM will also supply needed freedom of maneuver in high-tempo operations without losing mission command capabilities in transit.

"MCOTM will provide the Soldier the ability to leverage all of his mission command capabilities resident in his TOC," Williams said.

The versatility of MCOTM enables full spectrum operations from Tier One operations (stability and support) all the way up to Tier Three (high intensity conflicts) without ever having to set up a TOC.

"Instead of having to receive Command Post Of the Future updates from the FOB, the Soldier can be out on the battlefield circulating around and if a critical mission comes up, he can easily receive it on his CPOF, for example, or whatever system he wants to use," Williams said. "Then he can approve, disapprove, or modify it, or just simply monitor what is going on."

Currently there are nine MCOTM packages fielded in Iraq, four in Afghanistan, and four High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle trainers and one Stryker trainer at Fort Hood, Texas. The trainers are shipped to various points in the United States to prepare units deploying into theater.

MCOTM platforms leverage the Army's WIN-T Increment 1 network and will eventually integrate with the WIN-T Increment 2, which is expected to reach the first unit in 2012. WIN-T Increment 2 will provide the initial on-the-move network communications from division down to the company level.

"The Soldier on-the-move is getting more accurate information," Hollister said. "He is not relying on someone to translate a map or the common operating picture just using a radio. He can see exactly what his chief of staff can see back at the Tactical Operations Center. That is invaluable."

buglerbilly
30-09-11, 02:11 PM
U.S. Caps Humvee-Upgrade Cost at $180K

By MICHAEL HOFFMAN

Published: 29 Sep 2011 21:11

The U.S. Army intends to pay no more than $180,000 to upgrade each Humvee in its recapitalization program, according to the complete version of the draft request for proposals, released Sept. 29.


Above, the M1151 Enhanced Armament Carrier, one of the Humvee models. (U.S. Army)

Army and Marine Corps officials have said it makes sense to upgrade a portion of the Humvee fleet only if it remains significantly cheaper than buying Joint Light Tactical Vehicles, which the services expect to cost about $366,000 apiece.

"We don't want to be in a position where we are spending more to upgrade a Humvee than we would to replace that vehicle with an even more capable vehicle that we built from the ground up," said Col. David Bassett, Army program manager for Tactical Vehicles. "If it costs too much, it doesn't make strategic sense. You're better off just replacing it."

The Senate Appropriations Committee recently recommended the Defense Department kill the JLTV, saying its jobs could be handled by other vehicles, including upgraded Humvees.

Army and Marine Corps officials have since pushed back in public comments against that recommendation.

Christopher Yunker, Mobility Branch section head at Marine Corps Combat Development Command, said if an upgraded Humvee cost any more than 60 percent of what a JLTV would cost, the Marine Corps would consider the Humvee recapitalization a bad investment.

"What we're seeing is to get the capability you're looking for in the JLTV, your most effective move for the taxpayer is to go ahead and buy a new vehicle that will give you a 20-year service life as opposed to recapping an old vehicle that will give you seven or eight years," Yunker said.

The Army had said they expected each Humvee to cost about $160,000 to $180,000 to upgrade. An official with one defense team expected to submit a bid for the contract said he wasn't surprised the service set the ceiling on the high end of the range.

Army leaders plan to upgrade 60,000 to 100,000 Humvees by 2016, extending the life of the vehicle to 2030. The Marine Corps similarly plans to upgrade more than 3,400 of its Humvees. The Army specified the defense teams upgrade the M1151 Armaments Carrier Humvee variant although data will also be collected on the M1152 Shelter Carrier variant during certain phases of the competition.

Four major competitors have lined up for the recapitalization program, including a team of Textron Systems and Granite Tactical Vehicles, and industry teams led by AM General, BAE Systems and Oshkosh. AM General has built the Humvee since the Army first started fielding it in the 1980s.

Defense teams will compete to design upgrades to provide Humvee passengers more protection while maintaining the truck's speed and agility. Army officials listed crew survivability in the draft RfP as the most important evaluation factor in the competition.

The Army announced in the draft RfP it will split the competition into two phases - the research, development, test and evaluation (RDT&E) phase and the production phase.

Service officials will select three defense teams from the RDT&E phase who will then compete in the production phase where "the estimated total production quantity is 5,750 vehicles at a rate of 3-4 vehicles per day," according to the draft RfP's executive summary. The Army will pick a single contractor for production at the beginning of 2013.

Army acquisition leaders will host an industry day Oct. 7. The RDT&E phase RfP will be released Nov. 10, 2012, with proposals due for that phase Jan. 13, 2012. Up to three RDT&E contracts will be awarded May 30, 2012.

Earlier this month, the Army released the first part of the Humvee recap's draft RfP but left out sections "L" and "M" - the Instructions, Conditions and Notices to Offerors and Evaluation Factors for Award - the two most important parts of a draft RfP for contractors.

buglerbilly
04-10-11, 12:20 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

Humvee Competiton Taking Shape This Week

Posted by Paul McLeary at 10/3/2011 1:40 PM CDT



We’re getting closer to finding out if the Army and Marine Corps are really going to refurbish tens of thousands of Humvees over the next couple of years—and what that may mean for the developmental Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program which Congress wants cancelled, and which was recently folded into the same program office as the Humvee.

Last Wednesday, the Army released a slew of documents in a draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for what is officially called the HMMWV Modernized Expanded Capacity Vehicle (MECV) program, telling industry that a real RFP will come out on October 6, with an Industry Day on the 7th. The documents also set a deadline of January 13, 2012 for industry’s submissions, with a Production Contract Award slated for the 4th quarter of 2013.

The program is being split into two parts, with Phase One ending with the award of up to three Research Development Test and Evaluation contracts, with a single winner selected by 2013. Phase Two will then reopen the competition to all three of the original bidders

So far, we know who several of the companies bidding for the contract are: Oshkosh is in; Textron and Granite Tactical are in; AM General is in; BAE Systems is in; and I’ve been told that another major military vehicle maker is making an announcement this week that I suspect will be Recap-related. (More on that later.) Last week at the Modern Day Marine show however, we found out about another company throwing its hat in the ring—armor maker Ceradyne, Inc.

Marc King, president of Ceradyne Armor Systems says that the company isn’t rebuilding the vehicle like the other competitors mentioned above, but that its plan is to offer a bolt-on scalable armor solution that would be adopted by one of the prime competitors. So far, “we’ve been courted by a number of different primes” King says, adding that the Marines are currently funding testing of the solution, and that Army representatives have visited one of the company’s testing centers to get briefed on the company’s armor kit.

One interesting tidbit King passed along is that the company isn’t using an underbelly blast-deflecting V-shaped hull—a design spec which has become almost automatic in the age of the roadside bomb. Instead, the company has teamed up with Cellular Materials International from the University of Virginia, who uses a parabolic blast-absorbing crushable material that is being installed under the vehicle. King also said that Ceradyne is doing something that seems to be becoming a trend in the military vehicle market—it’s teaming with racecar designer Pratt & Miller to help design the spaceframe that will allow armor kits to be bolted on, and taken off, depending on the threat level where the vehicle is operating.

In all, this is shaping up to be a pretty interesting competition—and you can bet there’ll be lots of talk from all companies involved next week at the Army Association (AUSA) convention next week here in DC.

buglerbilly
04-10-11, 12:26 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

JLTV Draft RFP is Out, Finally Sets Cost Goals

Posted by Paul McLeary at 10/3/2011 3:33 PM CDT







It’s here! (Kind of!) The long-awaited (Draft) Request for Proposals for the next phase of the Army/Marine Corps Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program came out today, and we finally know how much the Army wants each vehicle to cost, and how many vehicles it wants to buy. The cost: $230,000 - $270,000 per base unit, with an extra $65,000 for the b-kit armor, comes in right about where many expected it to, and the Army has also put of cap of $52 million on this phase of the competition, which will end in May, 2012. A single contract award is scheduled for 2015.

The documents also state that the Army is looking for 20,750 vehicles across the family of six variants, which include the Utility/Shelter Carrier (JLTV-UTL), two seat; Close Combat Weapons Carrier (JLTV-CCWC), four seat; General Purpose (JLTV-GP), four seat; Special Purpose (JLTV-SP); Heavy Guns Carrier (JLTV-HGC); and the Command and Control on the Move (JLTV-C2OTM).

As far as a build schedule goes, once the final contract is awarded, the draft calls for 450 vehicles in the first year of production, 1,200 vehicles in the second year of production and 2,300 vehicles in the third year of production, with “a steady-state production rate of 3,360 JLTVs per year for the next 5 years.”

All of this information comes out a full five years after the program officially kicked off, and a few weeks after a Senate panel voted to do away with the program altogether. The Army also finally managed to cough up these unit cost numbers at a critical time for the program, given that the Humvee Recap program has stolen quite of bit of the JLTV’s thunder in recent months, and even stole $50 million in fiscal 2011 funding from the JLTV’s coffers.

So here we are. Can the Army afford both vehicles? Does it want to? Will Congress and the White House allow both programs to continue? Is there really a competition between the two vehicles, or can they compliment one another in a shrinking Army/Marine Corps arsenal? Lots of questions, and lots of hopeful-sounding draft RFPs floating around out there…

buglerbilly
04-10-11, 01:25 AM
Oshkosh Defense introduces TAK-4i system

October 03, 2011

Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, has launched its next-generation Oshkosh TAK-4i intelligent independent suspension system to redefine ride quality, mobility and maneuverability standards for off-road military vehicles. The system's design leverages 10 years of operational experience in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as the proven success of the Oshkosh TAK-4 independent suspension system, which has been used on more than 20,000 military vehicles to date.

"The Oshkosh TAK-4 system has brought unparalleled mobility to the battlefield on medium, heavy and MRAP vehicles," said Rob Messina, vice president of Defense Engineering for Oshkosh Defense. "Our engineers have taken mobility performance one step further with the TAK-4i to give troops a critical advantage in maneuverability, speed and durability as they navigate the off-road terrain that dominates today's battlefields."

Oshkosh developed the TAK-4i intelligent independent suspension system after studying military vehicles in action and calculating requirements for optimal speed, mobility and reliability on the battlefield. The TAK-4i system, which has completed more than 50,000 test miles with exceptional reliability, is scalable for use on light, medium and heavy tactical wheeled vehicles. With TAK-4i, a vehicle's height can be adjusted to maximize transportability and reduce the time and effort it takes to field vehicles.

The TAK-4i system delivers 20 inches of independent wheel travel, which is 25 percent more than other vehicles fielded with the US military, for new levels of off-road mobility. Improved shock absorption results in increased speed and significantly better ride quality for Warfighters who often travel off-road for hours at a time. The TAK-4i system is used on the Oshkosh Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) and the Oshkosh Light Combat Tactical Vehicle (LCTV), which are designed to deliver the protected mobility needed on remote, rugged and hostile landscapes.

Oshkosh vehicles including the MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV), Palletized Load System (PLS) A1, Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement (MTVR) and Logistics Vehicle System Replacement (LVSR) use the Oshkosh TAK-4 independent suspension system and have delivered proven off-road mobility in Iraq, Afghanistan and other challenging landscapes around the world. Oshkosh was also selected by the US military to retrofit its TAK-4 system on MRAP vehicles produced by other manufacturers to deliver urgently needed off-road performance.

Source: Oshkosh Defense

buglerbilly
05-10-11, 12:33 AM
Armor Works’ Hyena Stealthy Spec Ops Truck



Check out these pictures I snapped at the Modern Day Marine expo last week of the latest toy from the high-tech camo-makers at Armor Works. This jeep on steroids is the Arizona-based company’s entry into SOCOM’s contest for a high-speed truck that can fit into the back of a CH-47 Chinook.

The Hyena can carry a five-man special ops team and its gear at speeds around 90-mph over some pretty rough terrain, Mark Phillips, Armor Works’ VP of sales and marketing told me at the conference. The little truck features unique seating arrangement that places the driver on the vehicle’s centerline with the four passengers seated behind him. Each passenger seat can be equipped with a machine gun mount (as you can see in the photos) — two on the side doors, a roll cage-mounted center turret and another mount for a rear-facing passenger seat at back of the truck.

Here’s where the truck gets really cool:

See that big retractable pole sticking up in the photos? It can serve as a communications antenna and as a mast for electro-optical/infrared cameras that can be displayed on terminals inside the truck. This is great for a situation where the truck is hiding behind bushes or rocks. It’s also got an infrared lighting and driving system, allowing operators to roll in darkness. Meanwhile, that crazy looking 3-D camo all over the truck is Armor Works’ own TactiCam system that reduces the vehicle’s IR signature in addition to making it a lot tougher to see the truck with the naked eye — pretty badass. Come back for more on this camo tomorrow.







Read more: http://defensetech.org/2011/10/04/armor-works-hyena-stealthy-spec-ops-truck/#ixzz1ZrJ8xu9N
Defense.org

buglerbilly
05-10-11, 12:37 AM
These are older but clearer pics taken by Soldier Systems blog..............

buglerbilly
06-10-11, 01:05 AM
JLTV RfP: U.S. Lowers Cost, Shortens Development

By MICHAEL HOFFMAN

Published: 5 Oct 2011 11:47

U.S. Army and Marine Corps officials set a lower than expected cost ceiling and ambitious development schedule for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program in the draft request for proposals issued by the Army on Oct. 3.

Acquisition leaders from both services have touted the JLTV effort's recent strides in hopes of salvaging a program the Senate Appropriations Committee recommended for termination last month.

The draft RfP sets per-vehicle cost goals between $230,000 and $270,000 - much lower than the $350,000 officials had previously said they expected for the Humvee replacement. An additional armor kit called the b-kit should cost no more than $65,000, according to the draft RfP.

Three competitors will receive contracts for the engineering and manufacturing development phase to be awarded in May. A cost ceiling of $52 million was set for the EMD phase per contractor. The production phase contract is not expected until 2015.

Service officials cut 16 months from the EMD phase, which now will last 32 months. Col. David Bassett, Army program manager for Tactical Vehicles, said in September that he expected JLTV could be delivered sooner than expected because the Army and Marine Corps closed a sizeable gap in respect to a common set of requirements.

Defense analysts still have doubts about the program, especially after the Senate Appropriations Committee cut $243 million from it Sept. 15 and shifted $20 million to Humvee recapitalization. The committee chair justified the cuts while also recommending that the JLTV, which is in its fifth year, be terminated because of "excessive cost growth and constantly changing requirements."

Three defense teams have already built JLTV prototypes and a fourth, Oskosh Defense, has said it also will submit a bid for the EMD phase. The AM General-General Dynamics, Lockheed Martin-BAE Armor Holdings and Navistar Defense-Northrop Grumman teams are considered the front-runners.

Six variants with companion trailers will make up the JLTV family, which will include a four-seat close combat weapons carrier, a two-seat utility carrier and shelter, a four-seat general purpose vehicle, a special-purpose vehicle, a heavy guns carrier, and a command-and-control-on-the-move vehicle.

The Army released the JLTV draft RfP just weeks after issuing a draft RfP for the Humvee recapitalization program - two programs service officials expect to work together to upgrade its tactical wheeled fleet. When it started, Army and Marine Corps officials hoped the JLTV would replace their entire fleets. Shrinking defense budgets have forced those officials to lean more on upgrades to the Humvee and a smaller JLTV buy.

Defense analysts like Jim Carafano with the Heritage Foundation question whether the Army can buy both.

The Marine Corps remains committed to the JLTV, and continues to watch the costs to upgrade the Humvee. However, Christopher Yunker, Mobility Branch section head at Marine Corps Combat Development Command, said it doesn't make sense to recapitalize Humvees if it's going to cost more than 60 percent of what it costs for a new vehicle.

In the draft RfP for the Humvee recap, Army officials set the per-vehicle price ceiling at $180,000, which is 66 percent of the price ceiling set for JLTV.

"What we're seeing is, to get the capability you're looking for in the JLTV, your most effective move for the taxpayer is to go ahead and buy a new vehicle that will give you a 20-year service life as opposed to recapping an old vehicle that will give you seven or eight years," Yunker said.

buglerbilly
06-10-11, 01:12 AM
Sporty performance parameters and budget-cost cap burden JLTV program

This Analysis is written by Daniel Goure, Ph.D. Early Warning Blog, Lexington Institute

The U.S. Army has just published its long-anticipated Request for Proposal (RFP) for the next phase of its Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program. The JLTV was intended initially to replace the venerable Humvee while improving on that system’s survivability and performance. At the same time, the JLTV was supposed to have survivability on a par with the MRAP/M-ATV while being substantially cheaper. The new RFP is for what is called the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase. This phase comes after the completion of a technology development phase which saw three companies — BAE Systems-Navistar, General Tactical Vehicles (GTV), and Lockheed Martin-BAE Systems — provide competing designs. The EMD competition will be open to all interested parties, not just those that completed the first round. A final downselect is expected in 2015 for a single company that will produce a minimum of 20,000 vehicles for the Army and an as yet undefined number for the Marine Corps.

From the start the performance parameters the Army established for the JLTV were sporty, to say the least. The JLTV was to be more survivable than the Humvee while having equal or greater ability to carry payloads, additional power generation capacity compared to current vehicles, better mobility than the MRAP and advanced diagnostics. Did I mention that the JLTV was supposed to come in at least six different varieties as well? All this and a price tag well below that of the MRAP/M-ATV armored trucks built for Iraq and Afghanistan.

One of the perennial problems in defense contracting is that technical success is no guarantee of winning the brass ring. The three companies that won the initial development contracts have by all accounts achieved amazing success in most regards. Yet, the JLTV program appears caught in a budget-cost cap squeeze that could doom the entire effort. The defense budget is shrinking, somewhere between $400 billion and a trillion dollars over the next 10 years, depending on whether sequestration goes into effect. Moreover, the House and Senate Armed Services committees agreed to cut $50 million from the requested $172 million fiscal 2012 budget for the JLTV. Within the Army’s shrinking portion of that pie, the competition for acquisition dollars is becoming more intense as that service tries to support not only JLTV but the new Ground Combat Vehicle, a recap program for the Humvee and ongoing modernization programs for the Bradley Fighting Vehicle and the Stryker. The Army has already signaled that it wants to take more money out of the JLTV program. In addition, the Army has been steadily reducing its estimates of the total number of JLTVs it intends to buy.

Even as the size of the JLTV buy appears to be shrinking and the pot of money available diminishes, the contractors are faced with another challenge: the price the Army wants to pay for the vehicles. According to the new RFP, the target price of the JLTV, depending on the variant, is between $230,000 and $270,000, exclusive of an additional set of heavy armor, the so-called B-kit, which is to cost no more than $65,000. This compares with a ceiling price of $180,000 for a recapped Humvee. So, the Army wants a next generation tactical vehicle at a premium of less than fifty cents on the dollar compared to the one it is replacing. Good luck.

What exactly is good about this deal for the three companies that put so much effort into the first phase competition? A failure to meet the cost caps, even if for good reasons such as to meet performance requirements, will pretty much kill JLTV. In addition, the companies have to compete not only against the other teams who won the initial round but anybody else who wants to enter the game, for less money in the EMD phase, a reduced overall buy and the possibility that the Congress or even the Army might pull the plug on the whole effort. In any other sector, this is a deal no company would touch. Frankly, it says something about the commitment of defense firms to their customers and the American people that they are willing to work under these conditions.

buglerbilly
06-10-11, 01:50 AM
ArmorWorks Heat and Radar Absorbent Camo



Yesterday we showed you ArmorWorks’ Hyena light all terrain truck. The jeep-like vehicle can carry five special operators and two litters at high-speeds all while armed with up to four machine guns and ISR and communications gear. One of the coolest features of the truck is its TactiCam camouflage system.

TactiCam features lightweight panels of randomley generated 3-D patterns that make it pretty darn difficult for the naked eye to distinguish something like a vehicle from its background environment.

“When you do that, it’s hard for both visual and both vehicle-borne identification systems to look you up in a [vehicle ID] table if they can’t find” flat surfaces to match up the 2-D silhouette shown in the ID table, Mark Phillips, AmorWorks VP of sales, told DT at last week’s Modern Day Marine expo.

However, the coolest part about TactiCam may be the fact that these panels can be treated with infrared masking or radar absorbent materials, making them hard to spot with infrared cameras or even radar. Basically, special coatings reduce the amount of sunlight — and therefore heat — absorbed by the vehicle while insulation helps mask the heat generated by the truck and it’s occupants.

“The panels are multispectral signature panels, they will handle thermal and radar signatures,” said Phillips, who declined to get into their specifics.

The 3-D TactiCam plates are also painted with the company’s OptiCam camo system that is custom made for specific battlefields.

“We take hyperspectral color data from the battlespace and we can overlay that on a vehicle wrap and-or on our 3-D TactiCam panels so that you can have, at a very short turnaround time, color camouflage to blend into the [specific] battlespace you’re going to be fighting in,” said Phillips. “The benefits of having the panels with the camouflage on them is that you could be say, in the mountains of Afghanistan where you’re going to have a dirty white panel to match the snow and the rocks and then go down to the desert the next day and be able to swap out the lightweight panels and have a brand new coat of camoflage on there without sending the vehicle back to a depot for repainting.”

Phillips said that it would take ArmorWorks about a month to generate a custom set of the 3-D panels.

“I’ve got a computer algorithm written to generate the 3-D shapes and I can import a CAD file of the outside of a vehicle and I can then place the random pattern 3-D panels on that vehicle and then basically stitch them together,” said Phillips. “If I had CAD files of a vehicle and the color data from the battlespace, I can probably turn around camoflage in about a 30-day period of time. Now, I couldn’t do that for a fleet of 5,000 vehicles but for a special ops group going into a battle space.”

AmorWorks even hopes to bring the TactiCam tech to uniforms.

H added that the U.S. military is already taking hyperspectral images of Afghanistan from the air and the company could even use high-quality photos shot with journalists cameras.

“Embedded photographers, if they capture a raw image , I’ve got the color data I need,” said Phillips. “If they take pictures of the bushes the trees the flowers, the soil, the rocks — anything that’s there, I can get enough data from that.”

Pretty cool, I’ve got to say, it reminds me of the work BAE Systems is doing on a similar system that can render tanks nearly invisible to infrared cameras.

[I]Read more: http://defensetech.org/2011/10/05/armorworks-heat-and-radar-absorbent-camo/#ixzz1ZxTcLdrG
Defense.org

buglerbilly
06-10-11, 01:37 PM
Bushmaster Protection Upgrade In Afghanistan Complete

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Oct. 6, 2011)

Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today announced that Bushmaster vehicles in Afghanistan have been upgraded to provide soldiers with better protection against Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs).

The upgrade was completed in Afghanistan in August 2011.

Upgrades to the vehicles include the installation of new seating and flooring in the cabin to provide additional protection for commanders, drivers and the troops being transported.

“The upgrades will help protect troops travelling in the vehicle by absorbing more of the blast impact,” Mr Clare said.

“Bushmasters are a great Australian success story. They are creating jobs in Australia and saving lives in Afghanistan.

“We are constantly looking for ways to make them even safer.

“The threat of roadside bombs is always present and always changing. That’s why we have to be always working to improve the protection we give our troops in Afghanistan.”

Expert Defence and industry engineers from Thales and Stratos Seating developed the upgrades based on data from damaged Bushmaster vehicles hit by improvised explosive devices in Afghanistan and blast trials conducted in Australia.

In May the Government also announced that it would purchase an additional 101 Bushmasters to support current and future Australian operations.

-ends-

buglerbilly
07-10-11, 11:47 AM
Lockheed Martin's JLTV resists mines at lower weight

October 07, 2011

Recent government blast tests demonstrated that Lockheed Martin's Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) meets protection standards for IED-protected vehicles, while weighing approximately 40 percent less than other all-terrain models deployed in theater.

Lockheed Martin's JLTV succeeded in its blast tests, which used explosions commonly tested against many existing mine-resistant fleet vehicles.

"Our improved v-hull design is demonstrating its merit, having now surpassed Technology Development protection targets set by our customer," said Scott Greene, vice president of ground vehicles in Lockheed Martin's Missiles and Fire Control business. "Our team has produced a remarkable family of vehicles that strikes the right balance between weight and force protection."

The results verified Lockheed Martin's JLTV can protect soldiers from powerful blasts and still be transported by vertical lift, a new mobility option for the Army and Marines at this protection level. Previous US Army and Marine Corps tests showed JLTV can be transported by CH-47 and CH-53 helicopters.

"In addition to being helo-transportable and mine-resistant, our JLTV design also brings another important advantage to the battlefield: improved mobility. Its lightweight, agile design will help soldiers to evade enemies and avoid threats," Greene said.

The government results mirrored Lockheed Martin's company-funded blast tests on its improved vehicle design. The Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) vehicles feature evolutions in cab size and more affordable component materials.

Separate from those above-threshold tests, Lockheed Martin conducted over 20 blast and 200 ballistic component tests before Technology Development started.

"We anticipated blast protection requirements would increase for the EMD phase of the JLTV program, and we designed for it," said Kathryn Hasse, JLTV program director in Lockheed Martin's Missiles and Fire Control business. "We are acutely focused on providing enhanced force protection, performance and payload in an affordable vehicle system."

Lockheed Martin is pursuing the JLTV program, a joint services effort to return advanced mobility, protection and payload to deployed troops by replacing and complementing the aging High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (Humvee) fleet. The JLTV program creates a common family of vehicles consisting of the Combat Tactical Vehicle and Combat Support Vehicle, both with multiple variants and associated companion trailers.

Source: Lockheed Martin

buglerbilly
10-10-11, 11:32 AM
Saturday, October 8, 2011, 06:14 PM

Navistar Defense unveils his new Light Tactical Vehicle 'Saratoga' at AUSA 2011.

Look Ma, the bastard off-spring of a Truck and a Hummer..............:wave

Navistar Defense, LLC will unveil its International® Saratoga™ light tactical vehicle at the Association of the United States Army (AUSA) Annual Meeting and Symposium, which will ber held from the 10 to 12 October 2011 in Washington D.C., United States.


The new Navistar Defence Light Tactical Vehicle International® Saratoga™

The company designed the vehicle for superior survivability, mobility and transportability to target the gap between the current High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) Modernized Expanded Capacity Vehicle (MECV) and Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programs. The vehicle is ready for production to meet today’s mission needs.

“Defense budgets are shifting and the circumstances demand that industry anticipate what our warfighters need rather than wait for a written requirement,” said Archie Massicotte, president, Navistar Defense. “Finding a gap in the market is what we do in the commercial world and we are at it again for the sake of our warfighters. The government needs options and the Saratoga is an affordable solution – available now.”

The Saratoga light tactical vehicle has a high degree of commonality with fielded vehicles and incorporates Navistar’s automotive and manufacturing expertise. The company has also designed and tested its own proprietary geometry survivability solution for the vehicle. Considering material mix, vehicle structure and hull shape, the Saratoga offers a more survivable solution for the light tactical vehicle class while also meeting 76” transportability height. The vehicle meets the most demanding performance needs and has undergone more than 25,000 miles of automotive testing.

The Saratoga incorporates the MaxxForce® D6.0L V8 engine, automatic engaging limited slip differentials, Allison 2100 SP 6-SP Automatic Transmission and air independent suspension for added control. “We believe the Saratoga is a turning point for tactical wheeled vehicles just as the Battle of Saratoga is considered the turning point of the American Revolutionary War,” said Massicotte. “The warfighter needs it today and we are ready.”

http://www.navistardefense.com/NavistarDefense/vehicles/saratoga/saratoga

buglerbilly
10-10-11, 02:10 PM
AMPV on show at AUSA: A new dimension in battlefield mobility


(Photo: Krauss-Maffei Wegmann)

Extremely manoeuvrable, survivable and versatile – Germany’s new AMPV leads the way

06:23 GMT, October 10, 2011 Outstanding levels of tactical, operational and strategic mobility, compelling combat effectiveness and maximum survivability are key requirements imposed on modern military vehicles today – whether they are designed primarily for combat, command and control, mission-specific roles or transport. In contemporary conflicts, where the threat is often asymmetric yet deadly, protecting troops deployed in harm’s way from hostile fire, IED attacks, CBRN agents and even extreme climates conditions has become a top priority for commanders worldwide: around the clock and in every branch of every service.

This is reflected in the current procurement plans of the armed forces of many nations, including the Bundeswehr’s GFF/GTF project to develop protected C4I and mission-specific vehicles as well as protected transport capacity.

Under this programme, Rheinmetall and Krauss-Maffei Wegmann (KMW) of Germany have joined forces to develop a highly protected family of armoured multipurpose vehicles (AMPV) in the weight class up to 9 ton. Their design and layout take full account of operational experience accumulated by the German armed forces in Afghanistan and elsewhere. Engineered exclusively to meet the needs of the modern military, the AMPV family consists of two separate branches.

The AMPV,a prototype version of which is currently undergoing qualification by the German armed forces, is slightly over five metres long, two metres wide and two metres high. Empty, it weighs 7.3 tons and can carry a two-ton payload. The highly protected vehicle cell consists of a self-supporting steel hull with composite armour. Spall liners, reinforced flooring and cellular design offer excellent protection against mines and IEDs; while add-on armour modules supply extra ballistic protection.

High mobility likewise contributes to a vehicle’s overall battlefield survivability, and the AMPV design reflects this. The vehicle’s robust chassis, featuring independent wheel suspension, is engineered to withstand maximum punishment. An automatic transmission, permanent all-wheel drive, automatic differential locking management and combat wheels with a central tyre inflation system combine to assure superb mobility even in the toughest terrain.

A patrol version of AMPV (with an unprotected load space) will be available, as well as mission module carriers with a safety cell extending all the way back to the rear of the vehicle. For enhanced lethality, a remote control weapon station up to calibre .50 can be mounted on any AMPV vehicle.

Extremely compact, all members of the AMPV family largely consist of identical components, especially the logistically relevant parts of the vehicle. Moreover, their essentially uniform, highly ergonomic design makes all AMPV vehicles easy to operate as well as facilitating logistics and training.

buglerbilly
10-10-11, 11:57 PM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

AUSA Kicks off With Some Vehicle News

Posted by Paul McLeary at 10/10/2011 8:00 AM CDT



With the Association of the United States Army (AUSA) convention rolling into town this week, and congressional bean-counters and Pentagon planners deciding what defense programs the nation might be able to do without, the time is ripe for a good ol’ fashioned public relations campaign.

While watching "60 Minutes" on Sunday night—it's safe now, Andy Rooney has retired—an ad for Oshkosh Defense’s Light All Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) flashed on the screen featuring a wooden company exec touting the vehicle’s attributes. The interesting thing about the vehicle is that it was built on the company’s own dime, and as of right now, it’s not part of any official Pentagon development program.

Lighter than the company’s M-ATV, L-ATV incorporates some of the features of that vehicle while offering a scalable armor package that will allow different armor packages to be used depending on the mission. Oshkosh is also offering an option for the ProPulse hybrid diesel-electric drive train with 70 kw of onboard and export power. The company is positioning the vehicle to enter the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) competition once it opens up—again—to all bidders if it survives long enough to hit its next milestone.

While the JLTV is on the brink of extinction after a Senate panel voted to cancel it last month, Oshkosh is probably betting that even if the program doesn’t make it, the Army may look for something in between that and the upcoming Humvee Recap program, which also isn’t a sure thing.

But Oshkosh isn’t alone. Navistar Defense is also taking aim at that sweet spot, and today unveiled a brand new tactical vehicle that aims to “fill a gap” the company sees between those two programs.

Dubbed the Saratoga—company officials say the name was inspired by the Revolutionary War battle, which was a turning point in the war—the vehicle looks quite a bit like the Humvee, and it’s priced, with armor, at about $250,000 per vehicle. This puts it right in the Army’s wheelhouse, which has been defined as $180K for the Humvee Recap and about $250K per base unit, with an extra $65,000 for the b-kit armor for the JLTV. (Navistar is joining with BAE Systems as one of three teams competing for the JLTV contract.)

Like Oshkosh, Navistar has kept the truck under wraps for the past year, developing it on its own dime while driving it about 25,000 mi. (Oshkosh is at about 24,000), Navistar’s Pat MacArevey tells Ares. MacArevey also confirmed that Navistar is submitting a bid for the Army’s Humvee Recap program, and that the Saratoga—remember its outward similarity to the Humvee—shares plenty of similarities with its Humvee bid, including the same blast-protection package. Without giving away too many details, Navistar execs also told us that while they’ve already conducted seven blast tests on the underbelly armor kit, they’re bucking recent convention by not installing a V-shaped hull on the vehicle.

Interesting things afoot, and the convention only just kicked off this morning.

Pic: Navistar Defense

buglerbilly
11-10-11, 01:43 AM
AUSA 2011: Oshkosh takes wraps off L-ATV

October 10, 2011



Oshkosh Defense is using this year's AUSA exposition to give the US Army a taste of its next-generation light combat, all-terrain vehicle, the L-ATV.

The company is one of those that is pursuing both the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programme and the potential Humvee Recapitalisation project.

'We see L-ATV not just as the solution for JLTV but for any light tactical vehicle requirement,' Ken Juergens, vice president and general manager of Joint Programs, told Shephard.

The company says the vehicle incorporates field-proven technologies, advanced armour solutions and expeditionary levels of mobility to redefine safety and performance standards for military forces. It has a similar dashboard to other Oshkosh vehicles, which Jurgens said would facilitate training.

Oshkosh has produced six prototypes to date and has completed some 20,000 miles of mission profile testing.

The L-ATV comes equipped with Oshkosh's TAK-4i suspension system, which uses proprietary technology to deliver 20 inches of independent wheel travel and 25 percent more wheel travel than any vehicle currently in the US military's fleet.

The vehicle's armoured capsule is scalable and can accept multiple armour configurations to protect against IEDs and other prevalent battlefield threats. The company believes it is optimised for protection, weight and mobility, and its modular and flexible design allows the vehicle to accept a greater range of upgrades and continuous enhancements.

The vehicle uses a commercially based powertrain, but Jurgens said that the company had also looked at the feasibility of incorporating a hybrid diesel-electric drive although this was not currently a JLTV requirement. Changing the power train would have the additional benefit of increasing the internal volume of the vehicle.

Jurgens said that the company had not seen any surprises in the draft JLTV request for proposals (RfP) that was released recently. He added that the $250,000 price point was achievable and allowed the company to look at what trade-offs could be made. 'We meet all the JLTV requirements and exceed most of them,' he added.

However, he continued that there were some elements in the draft RfP that Oshkosh had been discussing with the army. 'We think some of the scoring criteria needs to be changed,' Juergens explained. He also said that value could be added to the submissions by requesting a test article and not just a paper proposal. 'The vehicle never lies. that's something the US Army learnt from the M-ATV programme,' he concluded.

‘We designed the L-ATV to address the rapidly evolving threats and provide troops with greater ability to navigate through extreme driving conditions,’ and stressed: ‘Battlefields have changed -- threats are more dangerous, operating environments are more rugged and fuel efficiency is more important than ever.

‘The state-of-the-art L-ATV is designed to meet these challenges, today and well into the future, just as our M-ATV continues to meet evolving battlefield threats without comprising its payload and off-road mission profile,’ Juergens concluded.

Darren Lake, Washington, DC

buglerbilly
11-10-11, 02:35 AM
As Army Mounts Effort to Rescue JLTV, Deal Made for Marine Version

By Colin Clark

Published: October 10, 2011



Washington: The Army is working closely with the Marines to salvage the $54 billion Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno said today.

The Senate Appropriations Committee recently killed the JLTV, citing out of control requirements and persistent cost growth. The committee cut JLTV "due to excessive cost growth and constantly changing requirements." The rebuilding of the Humvee fleet should take care of most of the military's need for tactical mobility, the committee said. The Marines have indicated for more than a year that they were skeptical of JLTV's benefits and had increasingly distanced themselves from the program.

But Odierno told reporters at the Association of the US Army's annual conference that "we are in the process of working with the SAC" and had made "some creative progress on JLTV."

The Army chief of staff said that his deputy, Gen. Peter Chiarelli, is meeting with the assistant Marine Commandant, Gen. John Donforth, to ensure the two services are on the same page. The two men "will go over there and talk with them jointly," Odierno said.

We've heard from a congressional source that a deal between the Army and Marines has been struck. The "Marines are back on board. VCSA and ACMC have a deal. USMC gets its own version, basically."

So look for a lighter, simpler version of JLTV to go to the Marines.

Three companies are currently pursuing JLTV: General Tactical Vehicles, a joint venture of General Dynamics Land Systems and AM General LLC; BAE Systems; and Lockheed Martin.

buglerbilly
11-10-11, 02:49 AM
Monday, October 10, 2011, 07:20 PM

Ricardo announced today that it has completed the build of the new FED ALPHA armoured vehicle.

Ricardo today announced that it has completed the build of the FED ALPHA vehicle as part of the Fuel Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator (FED) programme for the U.S. Army’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) – the company has been awarded a contract for the testing phase, which is currently underway.


FED ALPHA Ricardo wheeled armoured vehicle

“We are extremely pleased to be able to continue supporting TARDEC in its objective to increase the fuel efficiency of the U.S. Army’s vehicle fleet,” said Robert Ellis, director for military vehicle programmes for Ricardo’s US subsidiary, Ricardo Inc. “The FED programme represents an ideal application of Ricardo’s expertise in armoured vehicle design and fuel efficiency improvements.”

The goal of the FED programme, launched in late 2008, is to improve military vehicle technology, reduce fuel consumption on the battlefield and reduce the nation’s dependence on oil. Ricardo has applied its expertise in the design, development and manufacturing of special vehicles, and advanced automotive technology to create a demonstration vehicle that maximizes fuel economy while maintaining the capability and performance of light tactical wheeled vehicles.

In early July 2011, the FED ALPHA was on display for two days in the centre courtyard of the Pentagon. Since that time, FED ALPHA has been successfully completing government testing at the U.S. Army’s Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland. One key facility that is paramount to validating the fuel economy of the vehicle is Aberdeen Test Center (ATC) Roadway Simulator. This facility is the world’s largest automotive test simulator and designed to perform vehicle dynamics, powertrain performance, shock and vibration testing in a laboratory environment. This facility enables the FED ALPHA to be tested in a highly controlled environment so that small changes in fuel economy can be verified.



ATC will test the FED ALPHA over the drive cycle that TARDEC and Ricardo developed during the first phase of the programme. This unique cycle is comprised of various real world type activities (convoy, urban assault, cross-country and extended idle) that a typical military vehicle would encounter on a mission-to-mission basis. The real world testing of the FED ALPHA will assist in demonstrating and advancing the various technologies that could be utilized to improve fuel efficiency for other U.S. Army vehicles.

“The FED ALPHA vehicle is the culmination of Ricardo’s total vehicle system methodology,” said Wes Scharmen, Ricardo’s chief programme engineer for FED. “Each technology that made its way onto the vehicle was properly vetted to ensure that it aided in achieving the program goals of making a fuel efficient and creditable military vehicle.”

Army Power and Energy along with TARDEC will be showing the FED ALPHA vehicle at the 2011 AUSA Annual Meeting & Exposition in booth 4224. This event is open to the public and held on October 10-12 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington D.C.

buglerbilly
11-10-11, 11:55 AM
Bushmaster Ambulances Delivered


Source / copyright : MoD Australia

Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today announced that four Bushmaster ambulances have been delivered to the Air Force Health Services Wing at RAAF Base Amberley.

The Bushmaster ambulance is one of seven variants of the Bushmaster vehicle being built for the Australian Defence Force (ADF).

63 Bushmaster ambulances are being built for the ADF worth more than $670,000 each.

25 Bushmaster ambulances have so far been delivered to the ADF including:

--19 to 7 Brigade based at Enoggera Barracks, Brisbane;
--One to the School of Health at Latchford Barracks, Bonegilla;
--One to the Motorised Combat Wing, School of Artillery at Puckapunyal Barracks; and
--Four announced today to the Air Force Health Services Wing at RAAF Base Amberley.

Mr Clare said the Bushmaster ambulances were an improvement on the Sprinter ambulances currently used by the Royal Australian Air Force.

"The Bushmaster is a terrific vehicle - saving lives in Afghanistan," Mr Clare said.

"These ambulances provide blast and ballistic protection. That means protection from bullets and artillery fired at the vehicle as well as roadside bombs.

"This gives patients, paramedics and drivers better protection in high threat environments."

Mr Clare said the Bushmaster ambulances are fitted with the latest in medical equipment.

"The Bushmaster ambulance can transport two stretchered patients, or one stretchered and four seated patients, at the one time," Mr Clare said.

The vehicles will be ready for operational service after personnel have completed their training and medical fit-out has been finished.

Member for Blair Shayne Neumann said that RAAF personnel would be trained to use the vehicle and its equipment in all conditions.

"It's important that both drivers and paramedics can use the vehicle confidently and safely before they are used in operations," Mr Neumann said.

Source : MoD Australia

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news/38774/Bushmaster_Ambulances_Delivered.htm#ixzz1aTAArfac

geof
11-10-11, 12:40 PM
... (quote) The Bushmaster ambulance is one of seven variants of the Bushmaster vehicle being built for the Australian Defence Force (ADF). ... I can think of three or four .. what are the others (that have been ordered) ..

Gubler, A.
11-10-11, 01:00 PM
X

Gubler, A.
11-10-11, 01:02 PM
Troop variant
Command variant
Assault Pioneer variant
Mortar variant
Direct Fire Support Weapons variant
Ambulance variant
Air Defence variant

The Ambulance is the only major variant as it has a new, bigger rear door. The others are just internal repackages to allow for carriage of specialised equipment.

buglerbilly
11-10-11, 01:42 PM
GE Announces High-Performance 360° Local Situational Awareness Visualization System

(Source: GE Intelligent Platforms; issued October 10, 2011)

Applies to Tracked and Wheeled Armour as well as the light(er) stuff such as MRAP, M-ATV etc

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. --- GE Intelligent Platforms today announced at AUSA (October 10-12, Washington D.C.) the IPS5100, a complete, self-contained, ready-to-run platform that enables 360° local situational awareness and is capable of being easily integrated into a broad range of existing and new military vehicles.

The rugged IPS5100 is specifically designed to have minimal impact in terms of size, weight and power (SWaP) on a vehicle, enabling it to be deployed in environments that are highly space-constrained.

The IPS5100 is capable of handling the input from four to 20 cameras depending on the color depth and resolution (via video streaming over Ethernet) and delivering video to up to four operator screens in its basic form. Scalable to more than twice those numbers, the capabilities of the IPS5100 include real-time panning and stitching, slew-to-cue pointing, motion detection and archive recording. The provided software is designed to be flexible and accommodate virtually any visualization functionality required by the user, including symbology overlay of metadata.

The high performance of the IPS5100 delivers a typical latency below 80ms, making it possible to drive a vehicle by using the real-time video images delivered by the IPS5100 system.

IPS5100 hardware is a rugged 5-slot 3U OpenVPX chassis and enclosure which integrates GE’s SBC324 single board computer - featuring a 2nd Generation Intel Core i7 processor – for system management; the recently-announced GFG500 Gigabit Ethernet Video Processor for the ingest of multiple GbE HD+ sensors; two GRA111 Graphics Processors, each featuring the powerful NVIDIA GT240 96-core CUDA-enabled GPU, for display rendering; and the GE SDD910 solid state disk for up to 256GBytes of data storage.

The IPS5100 measures just 8.5” x 7.0” x 8.9”, and weighs only ~20lbs.

“The IPS5100 is unique in the way it addresses many of the key challenges that have prevented system integrators deploying true 360° situational awareness in the past,” said Al DiLibero, President, Military & Aerospace Embedded Computing at GE Intelligent Platforms. “It is available as an off-the-shelf visualization system with a high Technology Readiness Level (TRL), meaning that it can be rapidly deployed with absolute confidence.”

The IPS5100 has been developed and refined through many man-years of working with vehicle operators and system and platform integrators, resulting in unprecedented portability, scalability and configurability that allows it to be integrated – using existing vehicle electronics - in an effective yet unobtrusive manner with existing tactical vehicle software, hardware and human/machine interfaces.

“By allowing troops to remain ‘under armor’ and therefore protected at all times, the IPS 5100 can make a significant contribution to troop safety. Without a system like this, the combatant would need to expose his head to survey the situation around him,” concluded DiLibero.

GE Intelligent Platforms is an experienced high-performance technology company and a global provider of software, control systems, services, and expertise in automation and embedded computing. We offer a unique foundation of agile and reliable technology providing customers a sustainable competitive advantage in the industries they serve, including energy, oil & gas water, consumer packaged goods, government & defense, and telecommunications. GE Intelligent Platforms is headquartered in Charlottesville, VA.

-ends-

buglerbilly
11-10-11, 02:39 PM
Alcoa Defense Introduces ArmX Armor, Latest Innovation in Armor Alloys

(Source: Alcoa; issued October 10, 2011)

Applies to Tracked and Wheeled Armour as well as the light(er) stuff such as MRAP, M-ATV etc

WASHINGTON --- Alcoa announced today the launch of the latest innovation in armor alloys that provide optimal protection and survivability for the Defense market with the advantages of light weighting with aluminum. The new armor solution was introduced today at the annual AUSA show here.

The new armor alloy -- ArmX -- builds upon Alcoa’s more than 120 years of alloy expertise to create a product that combines reduced weight with toughness and strength for armor applications. Alcoa developed ArmX armor alloy through proprietary casting technologies applied to unique metal chemistry that ensure uniform properties throughout the material, even in thick sections. ArmX armor uses range from bolt- on appliqué solutions to vehicle hatches. Additional applications are also in development.

“Our customers can now immediately access a full offering of ArmX in large plate and forged specifications enabling efficient designs that will help keep soldiers out of harm’s way,” said Alcoa Defense President David Dobson.

ArmX will be produced at Alcoa’s facilities in Davenport, Iowa, and Cleveland, Ohio, both of which have been supporting the defense industry with continuous innovation.

“We continue to innovate at our research center in Pittsburgh then quickly move to full rate production based on our internal models and experienced metallurgists,” says Tony Morales, Alcoa’s Marketing Manager for Aerospace and Defense plate.

“Forged solutions with ArmX add a degree of freedom in design that is crucial to success and cost efficiency,” explained Fred Latrash, Director of Marketing and Sales for Alcoa’s Forgings business. “With forged solutions using ArmX, we are able to create monolithic shapes for doors, hulls and blast shields moving vulnerable seams away from attack.”

“In initial discussions, customers were excited about the detailed data we can share on ArmX and how it can address their immediate needs,” said Dobson. “And we are equally excited not only about the product, but the service we can provide in integrating structural solutions to our customers’ vehicles to protect occupants from blasts.”

Alcoa Defense partners with industry leaders to design systems and materials that increase the speed, reach, agility and survivability of military platforms. Alcoa Defense manufactures subassemblies, prototypes and complete aluminum structures that original equipment manufacturers can integrate into their platforms for land, air and sea.

Alcoa is the world’s leading producer of primary and fabricated aluminum, as well as the world’s largest miner of bauxite and refiner of alumina. Alcoa employs approximately 59,000 people in 31 countries across the world.

-ends-

geof
12-10-11, 11:43 AM
Troop variant
Command variant
Assault Pioneer variant
Mortar variant
Direct Fire Support Weapons variant
Ambulance variant
Air Defence variant


The Ambulance is the only major variant as it has a new, bigger rear door. The others are just internal repackages to allow for carriage of specialised equipment.

Thanks for that .. just thought maybe they had snuk one of the duel cab utes or copperheads through ..

buglerbilly
12-10-11, 11:51 AM
Still to come and not ordered as an official contract yet.................

buglerbilly
13-10-11, 02:41 AM
Industry Struggles To Control JLTV Costs

By Carlo Munoz

Published: October 12, 2011



Washington: Despite drastic changes made by the Army and the Marine Corps to the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program, defense companies are still struggling to get costs under control, according to an industry official.

Kathryn Hasse, JLTV program manager for Lockheed Martin, said costs for the new combat truck continue to be the program's "most challenging" aspect.

To that end, company officials plan to sit down with Pentagon officials this week to discuss how Lockheed is working to get its proposal under the cost cap set by the services, she said during a briefing today at the U.S. Army Association's annual symposium.

Other competitors on the JLTV program, including AM General, Navistar, BAE Systems and General Dynamics, are also scheduled to meet with military officials to discuss their JLTV plans.

Earlier this month, the Army issued a revised proposal request for the vehicle, which included a drastically shortened development timeline and a cost cap of just over $200,000 per vehicle.

This cap is roughly $150,000 less than what Army acquisition officials had originally planned to spend. To get to that new price, the Army traded off certain communications and force protection measures for the new vehicles.

The revised proposals request was drafted weeks after the Senate appropriators opted to kill the vehicle, due to excessive cost growth and schedule delays.

Since the Army issued the new JLTV proposal, top service leaders -- including Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno -- have ramped up the rhetoric on the need for the JLTV within the service.

As designed, the truck would fill the gap between the Humvee and the larger Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle for the Army and Marine Corps.

The changes made to the JLTV requirements will not force a major redesign of the vehicle, according to Hasse. "Technically we are very comfortable" with the changes, she said.

Those changes have also alleviated some of the pressure tied to dropping the total costs of the vehicles, she said, but noted the issue remains the single biggest challenge to the program.

Hasse claimed that soldier safety or ability to do their missions with the JLTV would not be compromised by the trade-offs made by service officials to meet cost goals.

On force protection, Hasse did note that not all of the JLTVs built by Lockheed under the new plan will have enhanced armor protection. That armor would have come stock on each JLTV under the old procurement plan.

The armor, she added, will now be offered as optional "kits" that Army crews can bolt onto the JLTV, depending on the mission. Hasse said making the enhanced armor an option and not a standard feature was strictly to get the base costs below the Army's cap.

The Lockheed program chief was adamant that the move did not mean that Army or Marine Corps units riding in a JLTV would have less protection than they would have.

Lockheed also ramped down the command and control system for the vehicle, changing it to a "scalable" approach and letting combat commanders decide how much or how little of the system they want on the truck.

Here's an interesting shot of what I believe to be the Ute version of the LM JLTV...........via Army Recognition

buglerbilly
13-10-11, 03:14 PM
Alcoa Defense to Supply ArmX Aluminum Armor Kits to Oshkosh for HEMTT

(Source: Alcoa; issued October 12, 2011)

WASHINGTON --- Alcoa announced today that it will supply ArmX aluminum armor kits to Oshkosh Defense for the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) A4. The c-kit armor provides blast protection for the underside of the vehicle. The announcement was made today at the AUSA show in Washington, DC.

“We are excited about partnering with Oshkosh to provide kitted ArmX assemblies, which provide excellent blast protection against improvised explosive device (IED) threats,” said Alcoa Defense President David Dobson. “We offer the complete value proposition of latest products and program management to provide highly engineered subassemblies to our OEM partners if they desire.”

Alcoa provides all elements of R&D through design and fulfillment to allow for unique solutions to move to market quickly. “Though these assemblies are complex, through our knowledgeable program management, we are meeting our customers’ lead times at 100 percent delivery performance,” says Victor Marquez, General Manager of Alcoa Transportation Products, where the kits are fabricated.

ArmX armor plate was formed with special practices to fit the HEMTT’s c-kit blast shield. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) can purchase ArmX forgings or plate, or they can acquire complete ArmX subassemblies that can easily be integrated into their vehicles.

“We made Oshkosh’s design concept for their HEMTT blast shield a reality by producing the 14 subassembly components,” said Dobson. “Our aluminum manufacturing expertise allowed us to take two-inch thick ArmX plate, which is made from the ballistic temper of alloy 7085, and form it into complex shapes. Alcoa’s unique capabilities in bending thick plate while maintaining its strength is unmatched by other manufacturers.”

Alcoa Defense partners with industry leaders to design systems and materials that increase the speed, reach, agility and survivability of military platforms. In addition to delivering lightweight, innovative solutions in multiple product forms, Alcoa Defense manufactures subassemblies, prototypes and complete aluminum structures that original equipment manufacturers can integrate into their platforms for land, air and sea.

-ends-

buglerbilly
13-10-11, 03:39 PM
Reset/Recap

Written by William Murray

MLF 2011 Volume: 5 Issue: 9 (October)



With fiscal year 2012 and beyond Defense Department budgets tightening and troop levels decreasing, military vendors are gearing up for opportunities to provide refurbishment of Army and Marine Corps truck and vehicles as a cost-effective alternative to purchasing new ones. They are also considering their potential to supplant military personnel in daily maintenance, in addition to the recapitalization and reset of trucks, HMMWVs and mine resistant ambush protected (MRAP) vehicles in the Army and Marine Corps, although MRAPs would not seem well-suited to the fight in Afghanistan.

With proper care, including reset/recap services that involve stripping vehicles to their frame rails and rebuilding them again, many of these vehicles can last for 20 years or more of punishing, in-theater use through the improvement of each vehicle’s suspension. Reset and recap services usually involve air conditioning each vehicle’s armor-ready cab and repainting the vehicle before its delivery to the customer with a more powerful drive train. To appreciate the value of these reset/recap services, however, military officials have to carefully consider total life cycle costs for their trucks.

One vendor said that using reset/recap services can result in as much as 25 percent cost savings, compared with purchasing new vehicles. “During this tough defense business climate, we believe there will be an increased reliance on reset/recap services,” said Bill Harris, director of government sales and business development at Heil Trailer International of Chattanooga, Tenn., which has been providing reset and recap services for more than five years. “Despite weak economic conditions, costs remain high and volatile. Combined with a moderating defense budget, these conditions will drive more reset/ recap business, which is typically more economical than purchasing new equipment,” he said.

Heil Trailer International and its Kalyn Siebert subsidiary are supporting the Army’s Heavy Tactical Group, the Marine Corps’ Heavy Fleet Team, and they are also marketing to the Air Force and Navy. For one contractor pitching its military truck repair capabilities, it’s a matter of his organization’s core competency allowing the military to focus on inherently military activities. “They’re in the motor pool working eight hours a day, fixing trucks,” said Lawrence J. Lanzillotta, vice president of Army and Marine Corps Ground Vehicle Reconstitution for Northrop Grumman, speaking of his personnel who maintain 6,500 high-usage Army training rotation vehicles at Fort Eustis, Va., and Fort Polk, La.

“Our workforce gets to be very experienced. A lot of them are retired Army vehicle maintenance personnel, and they’re not pulling Guard duty or having to go to the firing range for rifle qualification,” Lanzillotta said.

Northrop Grumman claims a 99 percent uptime for the fleets it maintains at Fort Eustis and Fort Polk and was able to meet the Army’s demands that a week-long gap between a vehicle maintained and returned to service be reduced to three days. “We know what parts to order ahead of time because we know what breaks,” he said. And the company was able to shift 20 repair personnel to one location to meet growing customer needs, Lanzillotta said. “It’s like if you had a rental car fleet of 7,000 vehicles in intensive use, you would know how many flat tires you would have in a month and know what to order ahead of time.”

Units visiting the National Joint Training Center at Fort Polk don’t have to bring extra parts or equipment because Northrop Grumman’s vehicle uptimes are so reliable, Lanzillotta said. “We free up soldiers to be able to do other work,” he said. A retired Army officer, Lanzillotta is a former principal deputy secretary of defense (comptroller).

Despite its success stateside, Northrop Grumman doesn’t have any responsibilities in truck maintenance with the Marine Corps or the Army outside the continental U.S. In addition to working in ground sustainment with the U.S. Army for 35 years, Northrop Grumman has worked with the Saudi Arabian National Guard in truck maintenance for more than 30 years, working with a fleet of 1,100 vehicles, according to Lanzillotta.

Outside the continental U.S., Army officials are finding that MRAPs are better suited for Iraq, a country with highways and better roads than Afghanistan, where the roads are more narrow, poorly maintained and sometimes no more than dirt trails used by farmers and animals.

Rushed into service several years ago in response to the congressional outcry that resulted from roadside bombs and improvised explosive devices in Iraq killing hundreds of American and coalition servicemembers during the first few years of the Iraq War, MRAPs have effectively protected U.S. troops from these deadly threats. “It was a highly survivable solution,” said Stephen Greene, vice president of communications for Textron Systems Corp. of Wilmington, Mass. His company has delivered 3,300 vehicles to DoD in Iraq. “But you couldn’t take them down a city street because they would hit buildings and knock down power lines.”

MRAPs are also known to occasionally roll over during operations, including one 2008 disaster in Afghanistan that resulted in three Green Berets drowning in a river. In addition to their troubles on primitive roads, MRAPs are also known to have difficulty with sudden turns and rickety bridges.

Greene pointed out that as many as 20 percent of MRAPs in theater are not in service. “There is a lack of parts to keep them going,” Greene said, forcing some soldiers and Marines to cannibalize from broken-down vehicles to keep the better MRAPs running. He argues that the Army and Marine Corps would be better served by having little variation between the models of MRAPs used, to make it easier to stock parts that would work on all MRAPs.

Oshkosh Defense, another major player in the Army vehicle refurbishment program since 1970, has upgraded more than 2,000 MRAP vehicles produced by other manufacturers with its TAK-4 independent suspension system to provide improved mobility in challenging terrain, which could be particularly helpful in Afghanistan.

“They could meet their goal of 80 percent uptime and not have to be as reliant on the supply chain,” Greene said. “It’s good for training to use fewer variations in MRAPs,” he said. Textron also works with the Afghan, Bulgarian, Colombian and Iraqi armies, helping it gain valuable experience that it can bring to bear in working with the U.S. military.

“There may not be a better way to use spare parts, but we would suggest that each logistic arm [of an armed services branch] look at developing contracts that stock ‘critical reserves,’” said Heil Trailer’s Harris. “The Marine Corps does this very effectively.” Usually a resource-challenged service, the Marines pride themselves on carrying out their mission effectively with less.

“The Humvee is survivable and reliable, but not reliable in some environments,” Greene said. “For effective recap, the [military] services have to have a better understanding of [total cost of ownership] for these vehicles to be in service for 20 years,” or the temptation will be to purchase new vehicles when a refurbished one could save the military money over the long haul.

In 2010, the Army asked Heil Trailer to consider installing an armor system on its tactical refuelers. “In the past, the military contracted with third-party suppliers and installed armor after the units were delivered,” Harris said. “This was very expensive and time consuming. By bringing the capability in-house for the government, we provided a better solution that saved the Army a lot of time and money,” working with High Impact Technology LLC to provide extensive training and modifications to Heil Trailer’s Athens, Tenn., facility to perform the “add-on-armor” government contract.

“This engineering and design effort covers a wide spectrum of systems and components used on our trailers, from tactical lighting requirements to suspensions designed to navigate extreme terrain,” Harris said, reached between trips overseas. “In addition, we updated the U.S Army’s engineering drawings so they would continue to realize exceptional armor kits on future tanker requirements,” Harris said. “We delivered an exceptional value to the government and that fact was recognized by [the U.S. Army’s Tank Automotive Command (TACOM)] Fuel Tanker Semitrailer System Acquisition Manager in April,” with effusive praise.

Oshkosh Defense, with 700 service personnel deployed in the U.S. and abroad—including more than 280 in Afghanistan—marked a milestone earlier this year: It had refurbished its 2,000th vehicle for the U.S. Army in-theater. Through the Theater-Provided Equipment Refurbishment (TPER) program, officials at the Oshkosh, Wis.-based company claimed that they’ve saved the Army significant funds through the service not having to ship the vehicles back to the U.S. for refurbishment.

“Many of the heavy and line-haul trucks that have come to this facility have seen almost a decade of rugged, in-theater use,” said Mike Ivy, Oshkosh Defense’s vice president and general manager of Army programs. “The TPER program allows us to significantly reduce the cost of refurbishing the Army’s vehicles,” he said in a company release. According to Oshkosh Defense, its TPER program work is enabling the Army to save 60 days of maintenance cycle time when compared to how long it would take if each vehicle were shipped back to the U.S. for repairs.

Working closely in supply chain management with TACOM and the Defense Logistics Agency through their facility in Kuwait, Oshkosh Defense officials repair 60 to 65 Army vehicles each month, using 300-1,000 replacement parts, according to a company release.

In July, Oshkosh Defense announced it had won a recapitalization contract from TACOM’s Life Cycle Management Command to refurbish 160 trucks from the Army’s heavy tactical vehicles fleet, including the heavy expanded mobility tactical truck A4s and palletized load system A1s. Oshkosh Defense would restore the vehicles to zero-miles, zero-hours condition at significantly less cost to the Army than acquiring new vehicles under the contract’s terms. Oshkosh Defense also reached a 10,000 vehicle milestone in providing support to the Army, Army National Guard and Marine Corps, returning the medium- and heavy-payload vehicles to zero-miles, zero-hour condition.

In June, the Oshkosh Defense announced it would deliver more than 730 trucks from the Army’s Family of Heavy Tactical Vehicles to the TACOM Life Cycle Management Command, showing the company’s key position in the Army’s fleet management strategy. Oshkosh Defense is working with the heavy mobility tactical truck A4s, which are a backbone of the military’s logistics and resupply fleet, and the new heavy equipment transporter A1s through the contract. ♦

buglerbilly
14-10-11, 01:35 AM
Supacat announces Australian operations

October 13, 2011



Supacat announced today the operational launch of Supacat in Australia and the launch of Supacat Team Australia, comprising 15 Australian partner companies, to bid, build and deliver the JP2097 Ph 1B (REDFIN) programme for the Australian Defence Material Office (DMO).

Supacat Team Australia is bidding the Special Forces HMT Extenda vehicle, which shares commonality with the Nary HMT fleet, delivered by Supacat to the DMO in 2009. The DMO is expected to announce its vehicle selection by the end of the year.

Supacat will be led by Australian national, Michael Halloran, who will transfer as Managing Director from his current position as Director & General Manager of Supacat's UK operations. Halloran has a strong track record in developing new businesses and extensive industry experience gained with Australian, UK and US prime contractors.

"Supacat will be first and foremost an engineering company, solving problems and developing products focussed on the people that use them, whether they be soldiers, drillers, lifeboat pilots or miners. Secondly, we will be an effective and efficient prime contractor, delivering on time, to cost and to quality", said Hallaron.

Also attending the launch was Nick Jones, Director and Founder of Supacat. Jones commented, "We have built Supacat into a strong business over the past 30 years and we are very excited to be opening our first international office."

To form Supacat Team Australia, Supacat conducted a rigorous down-select process to identify industry partners, who have all agreed MoUs. Supacat Team Australia will work in partnership to deliver the entire program efficiently, on a best value for money basis, within Australia. Supacat has already established its Global Support Solution in Australia in partnership with VEEM Pty Ltd to support vehicles in service with Australian forces and this will be expanded to support the REDFIN Ph 1B fleet.

Supacat Team Australia partners include: Aerostaff, Andrew Engineering, Baker and Provan, Broens Industries, Cablex, Eggler Consulting Engineers, Hallmark Logistics & Engineering, Hofmann Engineering, Marand Precision Engineering, PS Management Consultants, QinetiQ, Tectonica Australia, Unique Solution Partners and VEEM.

"Supacat Team Australia offers the Australian Defence Force an Australian led solution, built, delivered and supported by local industry. The delivery of the REDFIN 1B project will provide an enduring legacy of Australian capability and provide local companies with entry to global supply chains," said Halloran.

Source: Supacat

buglerbilly
17-10-11, 12:15 PM
AUSA: Jeep J8 Patrol Vehicle

by Brandon Webb on October 16, 2011


The Jeep J8 at AUSA

Keeping with the spirit of next generation vehicles, for those of you that know, Jeep and AM General are in a cage match over the next generation military vehicle. While this is big Army, Jack had a good SOCOM post back in July you can check out about Jeep vs. Flyer. I’m personally not a fan of the Hummer. Big, clunky, expensive to repair and sticks out like a turd in a punch bowl in any Area of Operation. I hated driving the Hummer when I was in Afghanistan and much preferred the Toyota Hilux four-door. I got to check out Jeep’s J8 up close and it’s pretty bad ass. It’s also rumored that while the J8 has been making the circuit, the real Jeep contender and full specs are not going to be revealed until the very last minute.

I like that it has a diesel engine that gets about 30mpg, and from a tax payer perspective you save a massive amount due to the availability of an existing commercial parts inventory. -Brandon out





Weapons Support and Vehicle Storage
LPV can mount a variety of weapon support systems configured as follows:
• Mounting plate on A-Pillar to accommodate swing arm and LMG
• Mounting plate on rear tubular frame to accommodate geared traversing ring for LMG, HMG and 40 mm AGL
• Universal ammunition storage: close to front weapon position and traversing ring operator
• Storage racks fitted internally on the sides of the vehicle, aft
• 6 lashing rings for equipment tie-down

Vehicle Structure
A tubular frame is secured onto the 3-door vehicle chassis with flexible mounting bushes at key points to enable the vehicle chassis and frame to flex when operating over rough terrain. This tubular structure is the mounting point for many items:
• Heavy-duty front bumper with mounting points for winch, driving lamps, IR lamps, tie downs etc.
• Front wing, A-pillar, bulkhead, sill and driver protection bars fitted with:
- Rear crew area support for traversing ring
- Heavy-duty rear bumper with tie-down points and tow hitch
• A factory-fitted Payload Enhancement Kit increases GVW to 3,864 kg (8,518 lb)
LPV features 2 mesh seats and gunner’s sling, with height adjustment for driver and commander. Windshield can be removed to improve visibility. Soft top provided for transport and storage.

Engine
VM 2.8 L (2,766 cc) 4 cyl, direct injection, common rail, turbo-charged, intercooled diesel engine

Read more: http://kitup.military.com/2011/10/ausa-jeep-j8-patrol-vehicle.html#ixzz1b2Jj4rxp
Kit Up!

buglerbilly
17-10-11, 11:09 PM
USMC Skipping Recapped Humvees, Prefers JLTV

Oct 17, 2011

By Paul McLeary



The U.S. Marine Corps is interested in “harvesting” technologies form the Army’s Humvee Recap program, but because of the capabilities they have already identified as essential to their mission, they won’t buy any fully Recapped Humvees.

Instead, according to comments made by the Corps’ Dan Pierson, deputy program executive officer for land systems, the service is banking on the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) while upgrading—not fully recapping—several thousand Humvees.

“When you look at the requirements that the Marine Corps had for the Humvee Recap, it was much more robust than what the Army is trying to get out of Recap, because we were trying to install a lot more mobility,” with more payload capacity, Pierson said earlier this week at the Association of the U.S. Army’s annual convention in Washington.

“According to Marine Corps studies, these requirements pushed the Recap price tag “up in the $240,000-250,000 [per truck] range,” which is the same price as a JLTV. Since the JLTV would be brand new, and “has so much more payload, so much more capability” than the Humvee, “the business case analysis for the Marine Corps for the Recap was just not there,” Pierson says.

Pierson added that since the Marines still need to sustain its Humvee fleet, “we’re still going to work very closely with the Army on Humvee Recap and be partners throughout.” In other words, they will take what they can from the Army program, without fully buying in to the effort.

Pierson spoke at a media briefing with Col. David Bassett, Army program manager for Tactical Vehicles, who praised the development of the JLTV, saying that the service has learned plenty of hard lessons about what works and what doesn’t, in trying to marry weight, mobility and protection. Bassett says that achieving Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP)-like levels of protection is now possible in a package that weighs about 10,000 lb. less than the original Oshkosh-designed MRAP All Terrain Vehicle (MATV), which itself is much lighter than the MRAP. “What we’ve learned is that there are really no silver bullets to achieve that level of protection,” Basset says. “It’s about good engineering.”

When it comes to recently released light tactical vehicles like Oshkosh’s L-CTV and Navistar’s Saratoga that are aiming to bridge the “gap” between the JLTV and Humvee Recap requirements, Bassett only says that “we do believe that this needs to be competed” and vendors will be able to come in with new solutions once the program is opened up once again to competition. Bassett and Pierson affirmed that the Army wants 50,000 JLTVs, and the Marine Corps wants to buy 5,500.

The JLTV program has seen better days. Last month, the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee recommended it be canceled, but no final Congressional vote has been taken. Bassett says canceling JLTV in favor of the Humvee Recap would mean that the Pentagon will not be able to meet all of its light vehicle needs, since Recap can’t meet the payload and protection thresholds that JLTV has demonstrated.

This uncertainty has caused Ashton Carter, the deputy secretary of defense, to recommend to the Australian government—which has long been a partner on the JLTV—to “take a pause” in their involvement, according to Bassett, who added that the Australians are still interested, even if they have temporarily walked away from the program.

Photo: US Army

buglerbilly
19-10-11, 03:13 PM
Demo Humvee burns 70 percent less fuel

October 18, 2011

By Gary Sheftick





WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Oct. 18, 2011) -- The Army has temporarily halted its testing of a unique fuel-efficient tactical vehicle so it could be shown to senior leaders and displayed in the nation's capital.

The Fuel Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator, dubbed "FED Alpha," is on display this week in the Pentagon courtyard for an Energy & Sustainability Technology Fair. Last week it was on the exhibit floor at the 2011 Association of the U.S. Army Annual Meeting and Exposition.

The concept vehicle has a solar panel on its rear hatch that can recharge its electrical system. It also has a custom engine, transmission and a score of other features that dramatically increase its mileage per gallon compared to other Humvees.

The vehicle has all the capabilities of an up-armored Humvee, but burns about 70 percent less fuel, said Steve Kramer, an engineer with the U.S. Army Tank and Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as TARDEC, headquartered in Warren, Mich.

Kramer has been involved in designing the FED Alpha for the past three years. TARDEC is working with Ricardo, a British company, on the testing phase of the vehicle at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

The FED Alpha may never be mass produced as is, Kramer said, but added that he hopes many of the energy-saving features can be priced low enough to make it onto the next generation of tactical vehicles.

"Hopefully the technology on here can get back into the force," he said.

The FED Alpha features a Cummins turbo-charged 200-horsepower 4-cylinder diesel engine, a six-speed automatic transmission, and low-rolling resistance tires.

The low-rolling tires alone provide an estimated 7 percent fuel reduction. While officials said that percentage may not sound like much, if applied to the Army's entire tactical vehicle fleet, it would add up to about $45 million in fuel savings annually.

The vehicle also has a gas pedal that provides the driver feedback if the vehicle exceeds the recommended fuel-efficiency speed. The pedal vibrates and provides force against the driver's foot, but if it's mission-essential to increase the speed, Kramer said the driver can punch through the feedback and continue the mission.

The FED Alpha also has:

• A high-efficiency 28-volt integrated starter-generator that enables electric accessories and 20 kW of onboard power for equipment

• A lightweight aluminum structure, except for the armored cab and underbelly V-shaped blast shield

• An improved driveline that uses a unique carrier and differential assembly, including non-geared hubs and isotropic super-finished gears to reduce friction

Since July, the FED Alpha has been undergoing testing at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The Aberdeen Test Center Roadway Simulator is validating the fuel economy of the vehicle.

ATC is the world's largest automotive test simulator and is designed to perform vehicle dynamics, powertrain performance, shock and vibration testing in a laboratory environment. It enables the FED Alpha to be tested in a controlled environment so small changes in fuel economy can be verified.

ATC will test the FED Alpha in convoy operations, urban assault, cross-country trips and extended idle situations.

A second vehicle, the FED Bravo demonstrator, is scheduled to be completed by late November or early December, Kramer said.

The FEB Bravo will be a hybrid-electric drive vehicle. It should undergo shakedown testing in Michigan before Christmas, Kramer said, and head to Aberdeen Proving Ground for testing in early spring.

buglerbilly
20-10-11, 10:19 AM
This vehicle was shot at the MiliPol show just held in Paris.............no idea what it is but I sure like the way it looks!

buglerbilly
22-10-11, 01:53 AM
I was just reading an article on the USMC Expeditionary Mortar system when I noticed this paragraph...................




The other big issue with the ITV is cost. The original Growler was made partly from salvaged M151 jeep parts – a vehicle that is reportedly available in several versions for as little as $7,500 in kit form, or $14,500 for an upgraded “tactical dune buggy.” In contrast, the ITVs will now cost over $209,000 each, which is itself over 80% growth from the original, and much-criticized, contract. Is the Corps really getting its money’s worth? Or did it end up paying vast sums, and offering little protection, because they were hemmed in by the MV-22 Osprey’s limitations?

Is the USMC totally FUCKED IN THE BRAIN!????

:wtf

There are tens if not hundreds of vehicles that can meet this need for a FRACTION of this idiotic cost...............its expensive cos it needs to fit Osprey.................BS, sheer nonsense!:mad

buglerbilly
22-10-11, 06:14 PM
Friday, October 21, 2011, 07:35 PM

Qatar's Internal Security forces order 22 HIGUARD MRAP and 5 Sherpa APC Renault Trucks Defense

The Qatari Internal Security Forces (ISF) have just ordered 22 HIGUARD (MRAP) and 5 Sherpa light APCs from Renault Trucks Defense. The signing ceremony took place on 17 October 2011, with delivery of the vehicles scheduled for 2012/2013.


HIGUARD MRAP Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle Renault Trucks Defense

This order is the result of 4 years of discussions with the ISF. The quality of Renault Trucks Defense vehicles is recognised by the ISF, which had already acquired other vehicles from the brand's range.

The HIGUARD vehicle is derived from a Sherpa medium 6x6. This vehicle can provide very high levels of protection in certain configurations and can transport up to twelve fully-equipped personnel. Its dissuasive silhouette makes it highly suitable to law enforcement units.


Video HIGUARD MRAP Renault Trucks Defense

Uploaded by armyreco on Oct 21, 2011
Qatar's Internal Security forces order 22 HIGUARD MRAP (Read more at http://www.armyrecognition.com/october_2011_news_defense_army_military_indust... ) and 5 Sherpa APC Renault Trucks Defense.
Army Recognition
Online Defence & Security magazine
Worldwide Defense & Security News
Marketing and communication for Defense & Security Industry and Exhibition
Land Forces equipment, weapons and vehicles
http://www.armyrecognition.com

The Sherpa APC Security and Law Enforcement version can deploy 10 men and act as a mobile command post. The Sherpa APC is the troop transport version of the Sherpa range. Designed in conformity with military standards, it offers excellent mobility and robust crew protection. This vehicle is already in service with several customers, including France and NATO.



Sherpa APC Armoured vehicle personnel carrier Renault Trucks Defense

Weasel
22-10-11, 06:26 PM
I was just reading an article on the USMC Expeditionary Mortar system when I noticed this paragraph...................





Is the USMC totally FUCKED IN THE BRAIN!????

:wtf

There are tens if not hundreds of vehicles that can meet this need for a FRACTION of this idiotic cost...............its expensive cos it needs to fit Osprey.................BS, sheer nonsense!:mad

Grasshopper: look at the date the RFP for the growler was put out. Then look at the locale of the winning company, then look at where an influential general and congresman come from, and you will find that they all match.

cheers

w

buglerbilly
23-10-11, 12:47 AM
Grasshopper: look at the date the RFP for the growler was put out. Then look at the locale of the winning company, then look at where an influential general and congresman come from, and you will find that they all match.

cheers

w

Maestro,

I already know that the pork-swilling swine predominate in parts of the USA political society BUT this is just plain THIEVERY! Personally, I'd shoot people for less............probably why I don't have a career in politics!

geof
24-10-11, 10:56 AM
... The Mini Moke makes a return ....

buglerbilly
24-10-11, 01:36 PM
U.S. Military Sees JLTV Development Gain Speed

By LANCE M. BACON and MICHAEL HOFFMAN

Published: 23 Oct 2011 15:59

The U.S. military's program to replace the Humvee has had more ups and downs than the road on which they are tested, but things look to be moving forward.


Above, an artist's rendering of Lockheed Martin's entry into the JLTV competition. (Lockheed Martin)

U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps leaders trimmed a lot of extras to cut the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) cost by $100,000. This also will slice 16 months from the $52 million engineering, manufacturing and development phase, which will end in May 2012. That means the $270,000 base vehicle will come cheaper and sooner, as a single contract award is now scheduled for 2015.

The Army wants at least 20,000 JLTVs with the potential for a larger buy for the program with an estimated worth of $20 billion. Army officials plan to replace a third of their 150,000-vehicle Humvee fleet with the JLTV. The Marine Corps plans to buy 5,500.

The services are now trying to convince the Senate Appropriations Committee, which had recommended the JLTV program be terminated, to come along for the ride.

"We spent all the time with the Marine Corps getting the requirements right that we frankly didn't tell the story to you all, to the Senate, and particularly the Senate Appropriations Committee about the good work that is going on," said Lt. Gen. Robert Lennox, deputy chief of staff for U.S. Army programs.

The new vehicle, outlined in an Oct. 3 draft request for proposal, will have the survivability of a mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicle, better mobility than a Humvee and the ability to add mission kits. It will be transportable by ship or helicopter and be able to provide 30 kilowatts of exportable power. Six variants with companion trailers will make up the JLTV family, which will include a four-seat, close-combat weapons carrier, a two-seat utility carrier and shelter, a four-seat general purpose vehicle, a heavy guns carrier and command-and-control-on-the-move vehicle.

The latest changes include an increase to allowable weight from 12,600 pounds to 14,000 pounds. The original number was needed so the Marine Corps' CH-53 Sea Stallion could sling load the JLTV at high altitudes and high temperatures. But industry teams would have to experiment with exotic materials to reach such weight, said Katheryn Hasse, Lockheed Martin's director of tactical wheeled vehicles.

And while most initial entries could produce as much as twice the required 30 kilowatts of external power, the new standard will cut weight and cost.

Critics have ripped the program's lengthy technology development phase, but service officials wouldn't have been able to reach the requirement consensus without it, said Col. David Bassett, the Army program manager for Tactical Vehicles.

Four defense teams led by BAE Systems, Lockheed Martin, Oshkosh Defense and General Tactical Vehicles, a joint team of General Dynamics Land Systems and Humvee-maker AM General, have developed prototypes and will submit bids for the EMD phase. Three will be selected to move forward. Officials are mum on a lot of the details, as they don't want to show their hand before placing their bets. But here is a taste of what is to come:

BAE Systems

BAE Systems delivered 11 JLTVs for the TD phase, which is 12 months of rigorous government testing.

The vehicle, now in its fourth generation, is designed with payload, protection and performance in mind but is scalable for future technologies, said Deepak Bazaz, program manager.

If the decision were made on looks alone, the sleek BAE vehicle would have this in the bank. But this isn't a beauty pageant, and BAE knows it. So its bottom-up design is centered on the soldier. The company even calls the vehicle a "Valanx," a combination of the ancient Greek "phalanx" formation designed to protect soldiers in combat, with a nod to the V-shaped hull designed to deflect a mine blast away from the vehicle.

BAE also teamed with the existing commercial base in a strategy to keep production and spare parts costs down, Bazaz said. Northrop Grumman has the lead on command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. The vehicle comes with a Navistar engine, Allison transmission and Meritor suspension.

Clip structures forward and back take the load into the suspension system to provide greater survivability. Ground height is not set, though earlier variants had a 24-inch max standoff. Simply put, the higher the vehicle is, the farther away the soldier is from a roadside bomb blast.

Officials said they "prefer not to share specific numbers" as the program approaches the EMD competition but are "very confident" the vehicle will meet reliability and fuel economy requirements. Bazaz also said the vehicle will achieve weight standards "with margin."

"It all comes down to performance against the requirements," he said. "We've got a very compliant vehicle at an affordable price point because of our commercial relationships and our partner strengths with our expertise in survivability. When you put all of that together, you get a very strong combination that we can bring to the Army."

General Tactical Vehicles

The General Dynamics/AM General team is finishing the redesign on a vehicle that combines the General Dynamics' skills in survivability with AM General's experience in this arena. And the influence of the latter is evident when looking at the vehicle, which some have described as a "Hummer on steroids."

The GTV JLTV incorporates the Stryker's double-V hull, said Mike Cannon, senior vice president of ground combat systems for General Dynamics.

"Lessons learned out of the TD phase are really going to inform us on the EMD phase," Cannon said. "We did not pay enough attention to quality going in the TD phase, but we're going to be dead on it in EMD. We're going to be all over it."

The tag team is also exploring other nondevelopmental capabilities, primarily relief from the height requirement. The company looked to negotiate a change during a private, two-hour session with program leaders that was offered to each company last week. Cannon said the height requirement would force them to reduce either the space between the vehicle and a roadside bomb or the crew space, and the company is not interested in an adjustable suspension because it adds a lot of cost.

"We have a really strong partner," Cannon said. "We have strong capabilities, systems integrators, systems engineering and survivability. That's our forte."

Lockheed Martin

Lockheed's JLTV is designed to bridge the capability gap between the Humvee and MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle by boosting mobility, payload and force protection, Hasse said.

The V-hulled vehicle achieved MRAP-level blast protection Oct. 4 while weighing 40 percent less than the M-ATV. Lockheed, which has partnered with BAE Global Tactical Systems, has logged more than 160,000 testing miles and has a fuel efficiency of 12 miles per gallon with the Gunner Protection Kit - a 50 percent increase over a Humvee with no armor. The company also is designing the JLTV to 13,800 pounds to provide a margin for growth and is confident it will hit the reliability requirement of 3,600 mean miles between failure.

"Are we there today? The answer is no," Hasse said. "But we will begin the EMD phase at a very substantial level of reliability … about 3,600 mean miles between hardware mission failure. That is a very reliable base to continue to tweak the design and take the corrective actions to achieve the level of reliability the government desires.

Soldiers will especially like the user-friendly crew cab, which was designed around the war fighter. Lockheed leveraged its aerospace background and systems integration experience to incorporate a substantial amount of capability into the dashboard, which frees space for the war fighter.

"We're going to provide the levels of force protection that the Army requires, which are substantially more than JLTV was and originally intended to do, and we're going to do it in a package that is very reliable," Hasse said. "We've already proven that in our TD program and our internal testing program."

Oshkosh Defense

Despite its strong showing with the M-ATV, Oshkosh is the new kid on the JLTV block as it did not participate in the TD phase.

But that doesn't cause Rob Messina, vice president for defense engineering, to lose any sleep. His Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle, or L-ATV, is the sixth generation in a light vehicle family in which Oshkosh has invested more than $60 million. "We can show reliable history, well-developed components and performances that are in the range the customer is looking for," he said.

This latest evolution leverages the M-ATV's modular and scalable protection. It replaces the diesel-electric power train with an electric power train, but its key strength is its mobility. The vehicle includes the TAK-4i intelligent suspension system. Built on 10 years of operational experience in Iraq and Afghanistan, the system provides up to 20 inches of independent wheel travel. These combine to provide a vehicle that is 50 percent faster off-road than the M-ATV, Messina said.

Improved shock absorption also allows high speed on rough terrain while keeping passengers comfortable and lowering driver fatigue. Messina would not say where the L-ATV stands on reliability, fuel efficiency or weight, but he said the Marine Corps' high-hot requirement, which is 12,600 pounds, is achievable with the base variant.

Messina said he is confident Oshkosh can provide a "threshold or better performance" at the cost requirement - so confident, in fact, that Messina said he will be asking Army leaders to change their policy and give credit for performance above threshold.

buglerbilly
27-10-11, 05:07 PM
Humvees Are Maxed Out; Army Needs JLTV, Says Gen. Lennox

By Carlo Munoz

Published: October 26, 2011



Washington: The Army has pushed its iconic Humvee combat truck as far as it can go and needs to buy the Joint Tactical Light Vehicle to support those vehicles.

The Army cannot load any more armor, communications equipment or other next-generation gear onto the Humvee, according to Lt. Gen Robert Lennox, chief of the Army office in charge of funding service programs.

The service is pursuing multimillion-dollar effort to revamp the Humvee. But some have argued the Army can save millions if they just used upgraded Humvees to do the job of the JLTV. "I do not think we can," Lennox told me yesterday when I asked if the Army could use the Humvee to replace the JLTV.

The upgraded Humvees were designed to supplement, not replace, the JLTV, Lennox explained. The Army would have to add a slew of additional upgrades to get the Humvee on par with the JLTV, he added.

The problem is the Army has already "hit the max capacity" on what it can do on the truck, as part of its ongoing Humvee recapitalization plan, Lennox said. Tacking on more equipment onto a combat vehicle that has been in service since 1989 is something the Army cannot afford to do, he said.

That said, the Army must press ahead with its plan to build the new JLTV, the three-star general added. Testifying before the House Armed Services tactical air and land subpanel earlier that day, Lennox and the Army's deputy acquisition chief Lt. Gen Bill Phillips dismissed the notion of upgraded Humvees replacing JLTVs.

Instead, service leaders have been focused on "getting the requirements right" for both programs and educating lawmakers on why the Army needs both vehicles, both men told the subcommittee.

But recent Army efforts to get requirements right for the JLTV is exactly why some are wondering whether a retooled Humvee can do the job cheaper.

The Army and the Marine Corps decided to drop several key features on the JLTV earlier this month, to get the truck's total costs down. The Army now claims it can buy the toned-down JLTV for roughly $270,000 per truck. Previous cost estimates have priced the JLTV at $350,000 per copy.

Trimming key features from the JLTV has made the vehicle virtually indistinguishable from the upgraded Humvee, Loren Thompson, defense analyst with the Lexington Institute and member of AOL Defense's Board of Contributors, claims.

The only difference between the proposed JLTV and the updated Humvee is cost, Thompson argues. That message has already begun to resonate in the halls of Congress. Senate appropriators opted to kill the JLTV in their version of the 2012 defense budget. Their House counterparts took $50 million from the program in their draft of the legislation.

In the end, growing budget pressures on the Army may force the service to consider using Humvees as a JLTV replacement, Lennox admitted. But until then, swapping JLTVs for Humvees is a question "we have not asked," he said.

buglerbilly
31-10-11, 06:00 PM
Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV) 1.1

Solicitation Number: H92222-11-GMV

Agency: Other Defense Agencies
Office: U.S. Special Operations Command
Location: Headquarters Procurement Management Division

Added: Aug 23, 2011 1:57 pm
This is a combined sources sought announcement and industry day announcement for the Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV) 1.1 requirement.

The United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), Directorate of Procurement has a requirement to purchase a Modified-Government off-the shelf (M-GOTS) vehicle with Special Operations Forces (SOF) peculiar modifications. This vehicle will be a highly mobile, CH-47 transportable platform with associated manuals, life cycle spare parts, mechanical/operator training, and a Government furnished C4ISR suite. It is anticipated that this procurement will be accomplished using full and open competition with the intent of awarding an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) type of contract. The acquisition strategy is being developed. At this time we are contemplating a two phase approach wherein Phase I would include written proposal and certified test data provided at contractor's expense, with an award of up to two contracts for further Test and Evaluation (T&E). Phase II would include Government purchases of approximately two prototypes for Engineering/Developmental Testing (DT)/Operational Testing (OT) from each vendor, with down select to single vendor and exercise of the production option. The Government invites contractor feedback regarding the feasibility of this approach. It is the Government's intent to release a Request for Proposal (RFP) which will be posted on this FEDBIZOPPS website.

This request for information does not constitute a commitment, implied or otherwise, that a procurement action will be issued. This notice shall not be construed as a Request for Proposal or as an obligation on the part of the Government. No entitlement to payment will arise as a result of the submission of contractor information. No other program information related to total dollars available, total quantity of vehicles authorized, or time line for official solicitation is available at this time. USSOCOM will post that information in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) to FEDBIZOPS after finalization of the acquisition documents.

All 4 attachments herein are applicable. In order to gain explicit access to the attachments, contractors must be registered in Central Contractor Registration (CCR) under NAICS code 336992.


Added: Sep 09, 2011 3:04 pm
The program office for the GMV 1.1 effort has recognized a need to expand the NAICS range for which explicit access should be allowed. The following NAICS are valid for explicit access as of 08 SEP 2011: 336111, 336112, 336120, 336992, and 336999. Due to proximity of the planned industry day event, follow-on accommodations will be made during the week of 17 OCT for the PM to meet with additional interested parties who were previously unable to register for the September event. Upon gaining explicit access to the program information, please submit the form to request attendance at the second industry day. No new information will be presented at the second event, so attendees of the first event do not need to register and will not be granted access to the second event. Registration is due 23 SEP, TIQ's are due back 30 SEP.

buglerbilly
02-11-11, 04:42 PM
McHugh Keeps JLTV Options Open, Except Humvees

By Carlo Munoz

Published: November 2, 2011



Washington: The Army is keeping an open mind on all options for its Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, but rejected using an upgraded version of the Humvee.

The Army is willing "to take a look" at all potential vehicle alternatives that can meet the JLTV's cost and performance goals, Secretary John McHugh said during today's Defense Writers Group breakfast. McHugh was vague on what current alternatives are under consideration. But one possibility was not on the list. "We are done with the Humvee," he said regarding using an upgraded version of the truck to fill the JLTV's requirements.

Some inside the Beltway argue the Army could get JLTV-like capability for a fraction of the cost by using revamped Humvees. That argument picked up steam earlier this month when the Army and Marine Corps lowered their expectations for the new tactical vehicle.

The services dramatically reduced JLTV costs by axing several key features from the combat truck's design, saving the services over $100,000 per vehicle. The cuts were designed to soothe tempers on Capitol Hill, which is growing increasingly impatient with the program. House appropriators axed $50 million from the program, while their Senate counterparts opted to kill the JLTV all together.

But the downgraded requirements also made the truck virtually indistinguishable from the retooled version of the Humvee, some outside the Pentagon claim. McHugh made clear to reporters today he is not one of those people.

There is simply no comparison to what a upgraded Humvee can do and what a JLTV is designed to do, he told reporters. The Army does not expect that assessment to change anytime soon, he added.

There is no way the Humvee could be modified to the point where it could replace the JLTV, even if the Army wanted to, a top service officer says. The Army has "hit the max capacity" on what the Humvee can do, Lt. Gen Robert Lennox, chief of the Army office in charge of funding service programs, told me last week.

McHugh conceded Congress could force the Army to change its tune on Humvees-for-JLTVs. But the Army cannot afford to take anything "off the table" given the incredible fiscal pressure it is under, he said. That said, the Army isn't quite ready to cross the bridge from the JLTV to the Humvee.

buglerbilly
08-11-11, 03:15 AM
Army Tests Raise Questions About Heavier Humvees; 'We Don't Know If They Can Do It'

By Carlo Munoz

Published: November 7, 2011



Washington: There is growing concern within the Army that industry won't be able to give the service what it wants for its improved Humvee fleet.

"We have tested some of the [upgraded Humvees] already and they did not prove out," said an Army official with knowledge of the program. "We don't know if they can do it," the official said of ongoing industry efforts. The Army will continue to entertain industry offers for the Modernized Expanded Capability Vehicle program, according to the official. But the proposals already on the table have been less than stellar, the official said Friday.

The Army is capping the number of Humvees it plans to upgrade in the coming years in order to get its Joint Light Tactical Vehicle into the field faster. The official made clear the decision was not tied to the lackluster performance of the modified Humvees. The Army plans to modernize between 5,000 to 6,000 Humvees, and they are meant only for its air assault units, the official said. The Army initially wanted to upgrade between 60,000 to 100,000 Humvees under the MECV program, industry sources told me. Now the Army plans to build roughly 50,000 JLTVs to flesh out its light tactical vehicle fleet. "The JLTV is the modernization piece for the light [combat vehicle] fleet. The MECV [only] goes after a piece of it," the official said."We are hoping the [Humvee] will get us there for our airborne and air assault forces."

Targeting the upgraded Humvee for the air assault mission should make it easier and cheaper for the Army to purchase the JLTV, the official said. The new trucks can be fielded faster since the Army doesn't have to worry about making JLTV light enough for air transport. They will also be cheaper since the expensive metals needed to make the JLTV light enough for air assault are no longer required.

It looks as if reducing the number of MECV trucks should quash any chance of the Army has of later trying to use Humvees to replace the JLTV. The Humvee cannot handle the additional armor and communications equipment it would need for it to be on par with the JLTV, the official said. Lt. Gen Robert Lennox, chief of the Army office in charge of funding service programs, told me last week the Army "has hit max capacity" with what it can do with the iconic battle truck. Army Secretary John McHugh put the proverbial nail in the coffin on the Humvee-for-JLTV argument last week, telling reporters "we are done with the Humvee."

Army leaders wanted to use the JLTV for air assault missions but Army and Marine Corps leaders decided last month to drop the mission to cut costs. That change helped bring the JLTV's price down from $350,000 each to $270,000. That move also forced the Army to look at the upgraded Humvee for the air assault mission, according to the official.

buglerbilly
16-11-11, 01:03 PM
Discover the IDF’s Future Field Intelligence Vehicle

(Source: Israel Defense Force; posted on Nov. 15, 2011)



An Israeli invention will soon be changing the world of field intelligence technology- the IDF’s Field Intelligence Corps’s “Granite” vehicle.

Developed by ELTA Systems Ltd. and based on the Ford 550 model, the vehicle is unlike the “Raccoon” observation vehicle, already in IDF possession, which scans back and forth in order to cover 360 degrees. Instead, the “Granite” combines synchronized radars and observation tools that scan the entire area at all times and focus automatically on every suspicious target. Additionally, the “Granite” has even better armor protection than the “Raccoon”.

The introduction of the Granit is not only an advancement in technology, but will also reduce the number of soldiers required to scout a restricted field from two to one, combining the roles of observing an area and focusing on suspicious activity.

Major Nir, Head of the Mobile Observation Department of the IDF’s Field Intelligence Corps, stated that the use of high-tech radars doesn’t undermine the human element and the operating soldier: “It’s true that the Granite system makes it easier for our soldiers to pay closer attention to the field surrounding them, but it doesn’t change the fact that it’s the soldiers that investigate each and every threat to its core.”

Another important feature of the technology is the synchronization among all the combat units deployed within the same mission. “Once the Granite gets a proper image of the threat, we can immediately send it to the tank and the aircraft that are also in the battlefield” says Major Nir. (ends)

Field Intelligence Corps Incorporates High-Tech Weapons

(Source: Israel Defense Force; posted on Nov. 15, 2011)



Faster and safer vehicles with high-tech radars and advanced observation tools to be used by female and male combat soldiers

The Field Intelligence Corps is purchasing more weapons for its female and male combat soldiers. The Corps recently put into use the new "Strom Mark III" vehicle upgrading its mobility.

Another advanced field intelligence vehicle, the "Granite" will soon be purchased as well. Based on the Ford 550 model, the "Granite" combines synchronized radars and observation tools that can see the entire area and every target. The vehicle is even better armor protected than the "Raccoon" observation vehicle, already in IDF possession. In recent assessments, the "Granite" succeeded in every mission and the relevant officials are evaluating purchasing possibilities.

Field Intelligence Corps officials are currently searching for mobile radars to use in the field. Additionally, the GOC Command is searching for screens with recording devices to be used as observation tools. These screens are similar to modern-day tablet devices. Once purchased dozens of these devices will be given to infantry units.

Other improvements in the Field Intelligence Corps will allow for the training of more female combat soldiers and field intelligence observers. The girls will train in reconnaissance along the borders and during other suspicious incidents. (ends)

-ends-

buglerbilly
17-11-11, 09:18 PM
Marines prefer JLTV over recapped Humvee

By Philip Ewing Thursday, November 17th, 2011 12:42 pm



Despite looming threats of deeper defense cuts — and uncertainty about whether the program itself will survive — the Marine Corps would rather buy new Joint Light Tactical Vehicles than modernize the vehicles it has now, our distinguished colleague Matt Cox reports.

Here’s the dispatch he filed from Wednesday’s House Armed Services land forces subcommittee hearing:

Lawmakers pressed Marine acquisition officials to explain why the service isn’t considering the Army’s Humvee recapitalization plan, an effort designed to beef up existing Humvees with cost-saving improvements so they can better cope with the modern battlefield.


“We are in a budgetary situation right now where everyone is looking to pinch pennies,” said Pennsylvania Democratic Rep. Mark Critz. “The move from the Humvee to the JLTV program — I’m trying to understand what the Marine Corps’ plan is. I have heard in some of the reporting that the recapping of the Humvee is about half the price of building new.”

The Marine Corps’ Program Executive Officer for Land Systems, William Taylor, said he didn’t buy that estimate.

“I would respectfully disagree that that Humvee recap would equate to about half the cost,” he said. “Our best estimates of what it would take to overcome the engineering deficiencies to provide a durable Humvee range somewhere between $240,000 and $260,000, so at that cost you are bumping up against a cost of a new vehicle that would provide much more capability.”

Aside from its fleet of Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles, the Marines have a trimmed-down fleet of about 18,600 Humvees and other tactical vehicles, said Brig. Gen. Daniel O’Donohue, director of the Capabilities Development Directorate, Combat Development & Integration.

The Marines plan to replace about 5,500 of those Humvees with new vehicles, he said.

“These are the ones that shoot, move and communicate forward; they have the most demanding profile,” O’Donohue said. “And these are the ones that we are looking at for the JLTV.”

MRAPs will likely be placed in war reserve for when they are needed, Marine officials said.

“We have cast a post-OEF Marine Corps which is not for extended campaigns ashore but to be a crisis response force,” O’Donohue said. “The MRAP was a substitute in a high IED threat but isn’t applicable for where we might go otherwise.”

As for the remainder of Humvees, O’Donohue said the Corps will maintain the fleet and modernize them in the late 2020s.

– Matthew Cox

Very interesting stuff — did you catch that bit about how O’Donohue says the Corps of tomorrow will be a “crisis response force” that won’t need heavy vehicles? This dovetails with the vision of at least two consecutive commandants, who have said they want the Marines to be a “two-fisted fighter” and a “middle-weight force,” not the “second land Army” it became across the 2000s.

But the Marines’ acquisitions have a way to go before everything is in place: The Corps still needs the F-35B for fast-jet air support; it needs its new amphibious vehicle so it can get troops ashore; and it needs JLTVs and other vehicles light enough and trim enough to ride aboard Navy amphibious ships. Some or all of these things could be up in the air going into the big crunch.

Read more: http://www.dodbuzz.com/2011/11/17/marines-prefer-jltv-over-recapped-humvee/#ixzz1e02hKWFp
DoDBuzz.com

buglerbilly
19-11-11, 01:57 AM
More on this................

Israel is Fielding a Tactical Intelligence Collection Vehicle

tamir_eshel

November 19, 2011 00:080


The IDF new Granite tactical intelligence collection vehicle is based on Elta Systems' ISRV system. Photo: Noam Eshel, Defense Update

Israel Defense Forces’ (IDF) Field Intelligence Corps’s has fielded an advanced reconnaissance vehicle called ‘Granite’, based on IAIs’ EL/I-3302 Intelligence Surveillance & Reconnaissance Vehicle (ISRV) developed by ELTA Systems Ltd. Elta has integrated the mission payload on the SandCat, an armored vehicle based on Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Ford 550 model. The vehicle has full armor protection and concealed telescopic mast, which can be erected rapidly as the vehicle halts.

Granite will augment and later, replace HMMWV based Racoon, delivered by Rafael in the early 2000s. Both vehicles are equipped with mast mounted multi-sensor payloads comprising a surveillance radar, and day/night electro-optical observation system.


Granite is based on Elta Systems' ISRV - based on the Plasan SandCat platform. Photo: IAI

Unlike the task specific Racoon, ISRV was designed to provide a as a hub for tactical intelligence gathering operations. The system architecture, user interface and reduced workload enables operation by multiple users assigned to different tasks, or a single operator supporting routine surveillance activity through semi-automated means,including slaving EO payloads to the targets spotted by the radar.

The vehicle carries the new EL/M-2207 electronically scanner array (AESA) detecting man-size targets at a distance of eight kilometers, with EO payloads such as long range POP-300 recognizing such targets from seven kilometers and designating targets for engagement by precision guided weapons. Elta designed the ISRV to deploy forward observations using the Man Portable Ground Observation & Surveillance System (MNPGOSS) and lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles, supporting manned or unmanned forward observations. The system also integrates with supported units can be performed over the IDF new ‘digital army program’ (Zayad).



Uploaded by talmonc on Oct 20, 2010

EL/I-3302 ISRV Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Vehicle
For more information please visitus at http://www.iai.co.il

buglerbilly
01-12-11, 01:06 AM
General Dynamics receives DURO APC order

30 November 2011 - 16:32 by the Shephard News Team



General Dynamics European Land Systems has announced that it has been awarded a contract by the Swiss Army for delivery of the DURO Armoured Personnel Carriers (APC) for the Swiss Global Mobility Task Force (GMTF). Under the contract the company will deliver an additional 70 vehicles.

According to General Dynamics the procurement of these vehicles was approved in the 2010 Swiss Armament Procurement Program.

The DURO is a highly protected and mobile wheeled vehicle, capable of transporting up to 11 soldiers. It meets the Swiss Army's requirements for a vehicle that provides troop protection and mobility for military applications, as well as peacekeeping operations. The GMTF Armoured Personnel Carrier is part of the DURO and EAGLE family of protected wheeled vehicles in the weight category of up to 14 tons. In the GMTF version, the DURO is 6.90 m long, 2.16 m wide and 2.67 m high. With its modular protection system, the vehicle offers very high ballistic, mine and IED protection. On the road, the GMTF reaches a top speed of 100 km/h and manages gradients of up to 60 percent and lateral inclines of up to 30 percent.

With high on-road and off-road mobility, the GMTF has a 245 hp Cummins turbocharged diesel engine, an Allison 5-speed automatic transmission, unique DeDion axle system with patented anti-roll bar, tire pressure control system and permanent all-wheel drive. All vehicles are equipped with an air-conditioning system and a NBC overpressure system for enhanced comfort and protection.

General Dynamics has already delivered 220 DURO GMTF vehicles to the Swiss Army, procured through the 2008 Swiss Armament Procurement Program. The Swiss Parliament approved the procurement of 70 additional vehicles to increase the DURO GMTF fleet availability for training and deployment.

The company said that deliveries will take place in the fall of 2013. The vehicles will be manufactured at General Dynamics' facility in Kreuzlingen, Switzerland.

buglerbilly
06-12-11, 09:03 AM
Interesting video of the Thales HAWKEI....via APDR........


Uploaded by VenturaMediaAsia on Jun 20, 2011

Channel 7 report on the Ute version...............


Uploaded by srprs8 on Aug 12, 2011
4x4; monocoque v-shaped armoured hull; 4 wheel power assisted steering; fully independent coil spring suspension; run flat tyres / optional Central Tyre Inflation System (CTIS); 3+ tonnes payload; 2-3 crews; ~7 tonnes kerb weight; 130kph max speed; 600kms max range; 200L fuel capacity; 600kg ceramic appliquè armour add-on kit; remote weapon station or manual gunring option; C4I ready; helicopter sling-load ready.

buglerbilly
09-12-11, 01:45 PM
Qatar's Internal Security Forces Order 27 Vehicles From Renault Trucks Defense

(Source: Renault Trucks Defense; issued Dec. 9, 2011)


Renault Trucks Defense HIGUARD 6x6 armoured truck


Renault Trucks Defense Sherpa APC Police wheeled armoured vehicle personnel carrier

VERSAILLES, France --- The Qatari Internal Security Forces (ISF) have just ordered 22 HIGUARD (MRAP) and 5 Sherpa light APCs from Renault Trucks Defense. The delivery of the vehicles is scheduled for 2012/2013.

The HIGUARD vehicle is derived from a Sherpa medium 6x6. This vehicle can provide very high levels of protection in certain configurations and can transport up to twelve fully equipped personnel. Its dissuasive silhouette makes it highly suitable to law enforcement units.

The Sherpa APC Security and Law Enforcement version can deploy 10 men and act as a mobile command post. The Sherpa APC is the troop transport version of the Sherpa range.

Designed in conformity with military standards, it offers excellent mobility and robust crew protection. This vehicle is already in service with several customers, including France and NATO.

This order is the result of 4 years of discussions with the ISF. The quality of Renault Trucks Defense vehicles is recognized by the ISF, which had already acquired other vehicles from the brand's range.

Renault Trucks Defense, a reference manufacturer for the terrestrial armed forces, designs and develops a full range of armoured vehicles, with the SHERPA. Legacy supplier to the French Army, with more than 4,000 VAB armoured personnel carriers in service, Renault Trucks Defense can claim more than 65 customer countries across the world. Employing 600 people in France, RTD's 2010 revenues exceeded EUR 300 M.

Armoured vehicles represent more than 60% of its activity, but it also has a truck offering geared to a very full range of military uses. Renault Trucks Defense participates in programmes with Nexter, such as the CAESAR artillery system and the VBCI infantry fighting armoured vehicle. It holds several brand names across the world, including ACMAT.

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buglerbilly
15-12-11, 03:54 PM
WTSI Delivers Fuel Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator to the U.S. Army



09:05 GMT, December 15, 2011 GREENBELT, Md. | World Technical Services Inc. today delivered a military ground vehicle demonstrator that tests technologies to improve fuel efficiency of light tactical vehicles. The Fuel Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator built for the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, or TARDEC, offers significantly improved fuel efficiency.

WTSI President William Sample formally presented the demonstrator keys to George Loewen, associate director of TARDEC Concepts, Analytics, Systems Integration and Demonstrators, during an official hand-off event today at WTSI facilities in Sterling Heights, Mich.

“WTSI is honored to partner with TARDEC in the delivery of a fully operational Fuel Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator to test technologies that can be transferred to other vehicle platforms that support our soldiers,” said Sample.

The demonstrator delivered by WTSI, known as FED Bravo, is one of two vehicle designs for the TARDEC project. The other demonstrator, FED Alpha, was engineered with a more traditional, systematic process. FED Bravo evolved from a “Monster Garage” approach that tapped into a broad range of military and commercial automotive expertise as well as academia for innovative engineering and design solutions. The FED Bravo demonstrator is powered by a parallel, road-coupled hybrid-electric drivetrain with a rechargeable battery.

The TARDEC project aims to improve fuel mileage per gallon by about 70 percent compared to current M1114 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles, or HMMWVs. Performance testing is under way. WTSI will provide subject matter expertise and logistical support during testing and demonstration of FED Bravo through 2012.

buglerbilly
15-12-11, 04:06 PM
Green Light for Hawkei

(Source: Thales; issued December 12, 2011)

Thales Australia’s innovative Hawkei light protected vehicle has won Australian Government funding for further development.

Thales Australia CEO Chris Jenkins today welcomed the announcement by the Minister for Defence, Stephen Smith, that Hawkei had been downselected under the LAND 121 Phase 4 program.

“This is a fantastic achievement for our engineering and production team, our partners and the 120 Australian firms that are part of our manufacturing supply chain.

“Up against the best vehicles in its class from US and European manufacturers, the Thales Hawkei has come out on top, which is a great vote of confidence in the skills of Australian defence industry.

“The Hawkei prototypes were developed in only 18 months and have completed more than 40,000km in vehicle testing. They have been subjected to more than 10 blast tests to prove the protection levels of the crew compartment.

“Subject to further discussions with the Commonwealth, the development contract
announced today will enable us to take the prototype through to a production-ready vehicle that fully meets the specifications set by the Australian Army.

“It is a truly innovative, highly mobile, highly protected, 7-tonne vehicle, with in-built vehicle systems to make it a real fighting platform for Australian troops. The Hawkei has been developed with Vehicle Electronic Architecture to be mission system ready.

“We will work closely with Defence through the further development of the Hawkei to ensure it meets their needs. Our international and local partners including Plasan, Boeing, PAC Group and many Australian SMEs will be vital to this project.

“Today’s decision also makes it possible for Thales to pursue export opportunities for the Hawkei. We have already achieved more than $100m in Bushmaster export sales, and the new Hawkei vehicle has great export potential, with a design that meets the needs of a wide range of military forces.”

Mr Jenkins also welcomed the Minister for Defence’s commitment to the Bendigo protected vehicle manufacturing capability and the skills of its workforce as “an important national security capability”.

Thales is a global technology leader for the defence & security and the aerospace & transport markets. In 2010, the company generated revenues of EUR 13.1 billion (equivalent of AUD 18.9 billion) with 68,000 employees in 50 countries.

Thales Australia is a trusted partner of the Australian Defence Force and is also present in commercial sectors ranging from air traffic management to security systems and services. Employing around 3,300 people in over 35 sites across the country, Thales Australia recorded revenues of around AUD 900 million in 2010.

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buglerbilly
22-12-11, 02:02 PM
Christmas Boost for British Forces As Ministry of Defence Announces £400m Protection Package

(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Dec. 22, 2011)


Foxhound Light Protected Patrol Vehicle undergoing extensive trials and testing at Millbrook Proving Ground, Bedford, prior to acceptance into service (stock image)
[Picture: Andrew Linnett, Crown Copyright/MOD 2011]

The Defence Secretary today announced a £400m package of protected vehicles and Counter-Improvised Explosive Device (C-IED) technology to further improve the protection of British Forces in Afghanistan.

IEDs are the single greatest threat to our forces in Afghanistan. Improving the protection of our forces on the front line is the military’s number one priority, and these investments mark another major step forward in the battle against the Taliban.

The package includes around 100 additional Foxhound protected patrol vehicles. Foxhound is at the cutting edge of protected patrol vehicle technology and will provide unprecedented levels of blast protection for its size and weight.

Today’s announcement will take the total number of Foxhound vehicles available to our Armed Forces to around 300.

The first of the 200 Foxhounds already ordered by the MoD are due to be delivered for military training over the next month, and will be available for deployment to Afghanistan during 2012.

This announcement also includes over £200m of advanced C-IED technology, giving British Forces a major boost in the battle against the insurgency.

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said:

“Success in Afghanistan is our number one priority and protecting our forces from IEDs is our most urgent challenge.

“Foxhound is designed, developed and built in the UK and this announcement demonstrates the Government’s commitment to providing our troops with world-class protective equipment.

“The vehicle will provide our Armed Forces with a highly protected and agile vehicle, and its manufacture in this country will create and sustain jobs across the UK.

“The C-IED package is another major step forward in the battle against the bombers, using cutting edge technology to defeat their evil campaign and protect our troops.”

BACKGROUND NOTES:

1. The original £180 million contract to build 200 of the new Foxhound vehicles was signed with FPE in November last year. The second tranche, announced today, is subject to final contractual negotiation with FPE.

2. Originally procured as an Urgent Operational Requirement, Foxhound was designed specifically to protect against the threats faced by troops in Afghanistan – for example, its V-shaped hull helps it withstand explosions caused by an improvised explosive device.

3. Its size and agility allows troops to carry out a wide range of tasks in environments that may restrict larger, heavier vehicles. Foxhound is ideal for the Partnering and Mentoring role required for Transition, being able to access urban areas with increased protection.

4. The vehicle incorporates state of the art technology from a range of areas, including from non-traditional Defence sources such as the UK’s world-leading motorsport industry, drawing a significant number of SMEs from across the country into the supply chain.

5. Its engine can be removed and replaced in just 30 minutes and it can drive away on only three wheels.

6. The second tranche of around 100 Foxhound will be subject to final contractual negotiations with Force Protection Europe (FPE).

7. The vehicle was designed, developed, and built in the UK by FPE and Ricardo plc, together with Team Ocelot partners Thales, QinetiQ, Formaplex, DSG and Sula. Construction of the vehicles will take place throughout the UK.

8. Since May 2010 more than £500M has been approved for the purchase of protected vehicles in Afghanistan, including the new Foxhound patrol vehicle.

9. Owing to the nature of the C-IED procurement, there are no other details that are releasable on this procurement that would not be in breach of its security classification


Foxhound is at the cutting edge of protected patrol vehicle technology and will provide unprecedented levels of blast protection for its size and weight (stock image)
[Picture: Andrew Linnett, Crown Copyright/MOD 2011]

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buglerbilly
22-12-11, 02:30 PM
Spartan Chassis Receives Order From BAE Systems for International Light Armored Vehicles



07:32 GMT, December 22, 2011 CHARLOTTE, Mich. | Spartan Chassis, Inc., a subsidiary of Spartan Motors, Inc., has received a multi-million dollar subcontract award from defense contractor BAE Systems to support the production of advanced tactical vehicles and spare parts under the International Light Armored Vehicle (ILAV) Program.

"We appreciate our ongoing relationship with BAE Systems," said Tom Gorman, Chief Operating Officer of Spartan Motors, Inc. "This opportunity—which is smaller in volume with greater product variation—is in direct alignment with our strategic and operational strengths of leveraging our expertise, speed and agility to produce reliable vehicle solutions."

Under the terms of the ILAV program, the Michigan-based custom chassis manufacturer will produce 10 ILAVs in two different configurations and supply ILAV spare parts. These mine protected vehicles, provided to the United States Government as part of a Foreign Military Sales contract with BAE Systems, are scheduled to be completed in the first quarter of 2012 and delivered to Iraq in the second quarter of 2012.

Spartan has a proven history of building ILAVs for BAE Systems since 2006 and has delivered over 700 of these vehicles to Iraq, Yemen and United States military customers. The ILAV features a 4x4 v-shaped hull and has five variants which include: International Light Armored Vehicle (base vehicle), Interrogator Arm, Explosive Ordnance Disposal, Joint Surrogate Vehicle and Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Training.

In addition to this new award, Spartan also continues its ongoing support of MRAP prime contractors and the U.S. Government by providing spare/replacement parts for many of the vehicles built at Spartan during the MRAP program.

buglerbilly
23-12-11, 01:06 AM
A bit more on the new Foxhound order..............

MoD Announces Purchase of 100 More Foxhounds

By ANDREW CHUTER

Published: 22 Dec 2011 10:37

LONDON - Force Protection Europe has secured a further order from the British Ministry of Defence for its new Foxhound light armored patrol vehicle as part of a procurement package principally aimed at improving capabilities to counter Taliban improvised explosive devices in Afghanistan.


With the purchase of 100 additional Foxhound light armored patrol vehicles, announced Dec. 22, the Ministry of Defence will now have 300 Foxhounds in its fleet. (U.K. Ministry of Defence via Flickr)

The MoD said it is ordering 100 additional Foxhounds on top of the 200 machines it contracted for last year to provide a highly protected lightweight patrol vehicle for the armed forces in Afghanistan.

The original deal, struck in November 2010, had a value of 180 million pounds ($282.2 million), although that included a sizable spares package.

An MoD spokeswoman said she could not give a value on the additional vehicles because contract negotiations were ongoing.

The first Foxhounds from the original launch order are scheduled to be delivered for training in the coming weeks, with the machines being deployed to theater early in the new year.

The original Foxhound order was paid for by the Treasury as an urgent operational requirements procurement. This latest batch though will come out of the MoD's core budget - confirming for the first time that the Foxhound is to be part of the military's long-term equipment plans.

The additional order for 100 vehicles is only half the original size the Labor Government said it would purchase at the time of the program's launch.

An MoD spokeswoman said no decision had been made on whether more vehicles would be needed. The MoD was "assessing the requirement for a third tranche of Foxhounds," she said.

The British Army is currently looking at its future force structure, including which of the many vehicle types acquired for the Afghanistan and Iraq campaigns will be brought into the core equipment program.

Because the armored vehicle budget has taken a huge hit in the last couple of years and the government is strapped for cash, some are likely to be taken into core, some gifted or sold to other nations, and some scrapped.

The Foxhounds were ordered to replace poorly protected armored Land Rover vehicles, which were held responsible for a number of deaths and serious injuries among troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Land Rovers were withdrawn from front-line duties some time ago.

The MoD said in a statement that the Foxhound is ideal for the partnering and mentoring role required in Afghanistan because of its ability to access urban areas with increased levels of protection.

The announcement of the order comes days after General Dynamics completed the purchase of Force Protection in a $360 million deal.

The MoD statement said the intention to purchase the extra Foxhounds was part of a 400 million-pound package that also included unspecified counter-IED technology purchases.

The MoD spokesman declined to comment on the nature of the C-IED acquisitions on security grounds.

buglerbilly
23-12-11, 09:53 AM
BAE Systems wins armoured vehicle awards

23 December 2011 - 9:36 by the Shephard News Team


Swedish RG-32M

BAE Systems Land & Armaments has announced that it has been awarded two contracts worth a combined total of more than $150 million to supply armoured vehicles to the United Arab Emirates and Sweden. BAE Systems made the announcement in a 22 December 2011 company statement.

Under the first contract the company will provide the RG31 to the United Arab Emirates. The RG31 is a mature, combat proven mine protected armoured personnel carrier designed, developed and manufactured by BAE Systems in South Africa. In total, over 2,166 RG31 vehicles have been delivered.

The second contract will see the delivery of the RG32M to Sweden. The RG32M, which is extensively in service with the Swedish Armed Forces, has various military and non-military applications to fulfil a wide spectrum of command, liaison, scouting, patrol and peacekeeping roles.


RG-31 as shown

buglerbilly
23-12-11, 02:18 PM
Germany receives 12 Mercedes-Benz Actros heavy armoured breakdown and recovery vehicles


Mercedes-Benz Actros sGeBAF. (Photo: Mercedes-Benz)

Models represent an important addition to the vehicle fleet currently deployed by the German armed forces

16:19 GMT, December 22, 2011 Mercedes-Benz has delivered twelve Actros heavy armoured breakdown and recovery vehicles (HABRV) to the German armed forces. At the official handover ceremony celebrated at the Materials Management Centre in Hesedorf, Michael Dietz, Head of Sales and Marketing for Mercedes-Benz Special Trucks, handed over the keys to Hans Thünemann, Director and U4 Project Group Leader at the Federal Office of Defence Technology and Procurement (BWB).

On hand to accept the keys on behalf of the end users was the commander of the 13th Armoured Infantry Division, Brigadier General Klaus von Heimendahl, who in turn handed over possession of the Actros HABRV - referred to in the armed forces as the "Bison" - to the vehicle crew attending on behalf of the armed forces.

Along with the HABRV, Mercedes-Benz is also providing a complete solution comprising special tools, original equipment spare parts, a package for Integrated Logistic Support (ILS), training documentation and training sessions for instructors, as well as a service agreement ensuring that Mercedes-Benz aftersales service support is available both at home and abroad.

Prior to delivery, the vehicles were subjected to an intensive initial inspection at the Mercedes-Benz test terrain, as they could be put to immediate use following their arrival in Afghanistan in January 2012.

DELIVERED IN THE SHORTEST POSSIBLE TIME

Mercedes-Benz was commissioned by th BWB in March 2011 to produce and deliver twelve HABRV models, with the stipulation that the vehicles were to be supplied in the period between September and December 2011. The fact that barely half a year has elapsed between the signing of the contract and delivery of the first vehicle demonstrates that Mercedes-Benz armoured vehicles are not only ready for series production but also already commercially available.

“OFF-THE-SHELF” ARMOURED VEHICLES

Forming the basis of the HABRV is the Actros 4151 AK 8x8. Mercedes-Benz produces these individual special vehicles using tried-and-tested series production parts and components as part of its own "off-the-shelf" manufacturing processes, which in turn are based on its flexible production lines.

IMPORTANT ADDITION TO THE VEHICLE FLEET DEPLOYED BY THE ARMED FORCES

The heavily-armoured HABRV Bison system implemented on the Mercedes-Benz Actros 4151 AK 8x8 sets new standards for logistics vehicles in terms of performance and protection, and makes the ideal addition to the armed forces vehicle fleet for deployment applications thanks to the outstanding mobility and optimum protection it provides.

geof
24-12-11, 04:51 AM
.. Luv the pic .. Merc towing the MAN .. :-p

buglerbilly
05-01-12, 11:50 AM
Thursday, January 5, 2012, 12:11 AM

The Italian armoured LMV IVECO Defence Vehicles will be produced in Russia.

Russian Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov announced in December 2011 that the production of armored vehicles Iveco LMV M65 Lynx for the needs of the Russian Ministry of defense will be located in Voronezh, Russia.


LMV IVECO Light Multirole Armoured Vehicle during trial tests in Russia

The Italian LMV vehicle has passed driving performance tests and resistance to landmines explosion by the Russian military. Italy has proposed now a joint venture to produce the vehicle in Russia.

According to information from the Russian newspaper "Rossiyskaya Gazeta", the vehicle LMV could be manufactured locally by the company KamAZ with technical assistance of the Italian Company Iveco Defence Vehicles. First, the main candidate for partnership with the Italians could be the Russian Defence Compnay "KamAZ", but the relevant agreement has not been achieved.

The Russian Ministry of Defence has decided in 2010 to supply its armed forces with the wheeled armored vehicle LMV, with production in Russia.

The main competitor of LMV called "Tiger" (GAZ-2330), produced by BMK Arzamas Machinery Plant which is supplied to the Russian army since 2007. At the end of 2010 the Russian Ministry of Defense acquired in Italy, ten armored vehicles LMV M65 for testing in the Army in Russia. In the future, during the next 5 years between 1,500 and 1,700 LMV vehicles with a unit value of 300-500 thousands Euro should be assembled in Russia.

buglerbilly
07-01-12, 03:04 AM
At $230K, JLTV Still A Bridge Too Far For Congress

By Carlo Munoz

Published: January 6, 2012



WASHINGTON: Army and Marine Corps efforts to cut costs on the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle may be too little, too late to save the program, according to a new Congressional Research Service report.

The initial sticker shock for the JLTV has not faded away from congressional lawmakers minds, despite the services' cost reduction efforts. Breaking that mentality inside Congress will be difficult and could end up sealing the program's fate, according to the report. "Given this wide-ranging opposition to the JLTV program on the basis of affordability, even a [cheaper] JLTV variant might prove to be difficult to justify," CRS analysts write. Last year, legislators scoffed at the vehicle's initial $350,000 price tag. And they made their feelings known by stripping millions from the program in the fiscal 2012 defense spending legislation.

As a result, the Army and Marines rolled out a new JLTV proposal request last October featuring a drastically shortened development timeline and per unit cost of just over $200,000 per truck. That revised price tag was $150,000 cheaper than initial service estimates. But doubts continue to swirl on Capitol Hill over whether the services can keep that promise, the report states.

Army and Marine Corps officials were able to significantly cut JLTV costs by stripping a number of capabilities from the base version of the truck. Standard armor setups on the JLTV became optional. Advanced command and communication packages slated for the truck were broken down into "scaleable" segments that can be added onto the standard JLTV. Taking these elements out of the JLTV equation got the services where they needed to be on cost.

Thing is, these options -- if deemed necessary by service requirements -- may be tacked back into the JLTV, the report points out. Once those amenities go back onto the vehicle, those cost savings go out the window. And, most importantly to the Hill, there is nothing lawmakers can do about it once funding is approved. "Given this possibility, Congress might choose to closely monitor the Army and Marines during the rest of [the program] . . . . to ensure that the services do not make significant requirements changes [or] additions that could adversely affect the JLTV development timeline and program cost."

Despite those concerns, the JLTV continues to have to full backing of top Army and Marine Corps brass. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno and Army Secretary John McHugh have stated repeatedly that JLTV will be the service's combat truck of the future. Will that be enough to save a program that many claim to be a poster child for Pentagon procurement bloat? Or will the Hill wield their power of the purse and put the JLTV out to pasture once and for all?

Stay tuned.

buglerbilly
10-01-12, 04:29 AM
Monday, January 9, 2012, 03:40 PM

Israeli army plans to add 2,500 light tactical vehicles Humvee to its military fleet.

The Israeli military plans to add 2,500 Humvee jeeps to its fleet in one of the largest procurement deals between the two countries in recent years. The United States deployed the all-terrain vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan, and thousands have already been shipped home as part of the military's withdrawal in December. Most were low mileage, making them a worthwhile purchase for the Israel Defense Forces' ( IDF) needs, the Yediot Aharonot daily reported Sunday, January 8, 2011.


Israeli Humvee light tactical vehicle

The IDF (Israel Defence Forces) currently operates an undisclosed number of High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs), better known in the U.S. Army as "Humvees," in a host of tactical roles, primarily for utility, logistical and scout missions. Many of the vehicles have been modified and upgraded with heavy steel plating, ballistic-resistant windows and other measures meant to provide better protection for troops in urban guerrilla warfare.

The Americans and allied forces deployed unarmored Humvees that often fell prey to roadside bombs, small-arms fire and RPG (rocket- propelled grenade) attacks. Heavy casualties eventually prompted the U.S. Army to launch an emergency armoring program. Some of the armor cladding was manufactured in Israel.

The cost of the deal and delivery date were unclear, although Israeli defense officials said the bulk of the deal will be financed via American military aid funds to Israel, which total some 3 billion U.S. dollars a year.

While senior Israeli officers recently visited the United States to finalize the deal, which also includes heavy trucks and other U.S. military surplus, an Israeli Defense Ministry spokesman could not immediately confirm the deal's current status.

The army plans to store most of the fleet in emergency depots, where they will be maintained for wartime use.

buglerbilly
10-01-12, 01:48 PM
Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV): Background and Issues for Congress

(Source: Congressional Research Service; issued January 3, 2012)

The Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) is being developed by the Army and the Marine Corps as a successor to the 11 different versions of the High Mobility, Multi-Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) that have been in service since 1985.

On October 28, 2008, three awards were made for the JLTV Technology Development (TD) Phase, which is scheduled to conclude in the June 2011 timeframe to three industry teams: (1) BAE Systems, (2) the team of Lockheed Martin and General Tactical Vehicle, and (3) AM General and General Dynamics Land Systems. Once testing was completed and technology requirements established, a full and open competition was expected to be conducted in the late summer, 2011 for the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) Phase and the Department of Defense (DOD) planned to award two contracts for the EMD phase, which was scheduled to last 24 months.

In February 2011, it was announced that the award of the EMD contract would be delayed until January or February 2012 because the Army changed requirements for the JLTV. DOD had planned to award two contracts for the EMD phase, which was scheduled to last 24 months, but instead proposed a 48-month-long EMD.

There will be two JLTV variants—a Combat Tactical Vehicle (CTV) that can transport four passengers and carry 3,500 pounds and a Combat Support Vehicle (CSV) that can transport two passengers and carry 5,100 pounds.

The FY2012 Budget Request for JLTVs is $172.1 million for Army Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) and $71.8 million for Marine Corps RDT&E, for a program total of $243.9 million.

The Senate Appropriations Committee Defense Subcommittee recommended terminating the JLTV program, noting “excessive cost growth, constantly changing requirements, and existing alternatives.” In response, Army and Marine leadership seemingly put aside past differences by relaxing transportability requirements and setting a goal for a lower per-unit cost of $225,000 per vehicle. In addition, the EMD phase would be cut by 16 months—now 32 months as opposed to the previous 48 months.

The FY2012 National Authorization Act (H.R. 1540) decreased the Army’s JLTV budget request by $64.8 million and the Marine’s request by $24.9 million due to the delay of the awarding for the EMD contract. The FY2012 Department of Defense Appropriations Bill (H.R. 2055, P.L. 112-74) provides $87.3 million for Army JLTV RDT&E and $46.7 million for the Marines in recognition that the Services have made changes to the program to simplify the JLTV design, ease requirements, and decrease per-vehicle costs.

Potential issues for Congress include affordability of the JLTV in relation to HMMWV and MRAP and in the overall context of an anticipated “challenging economic environment.” Another concern is that, even though the Army and Marines have dropped some requirements to lower per-vehicle costs, requirements might be added in the future, driving up the program cost.

The Army and Marines have both noted that, despite emphasis on recapitalizing HMMWVs and MRAPs in lieu of developing JLTVs, there are limitations concerning the degree to which these vehicles can be upgraded and still be operationally effective.

Another possible issue for consideration is the new lower JLTV per-vehicle cost target might be close to that of recapitalized HMMWVs, bringing into question if it is better and more cost effective to procure “new” JLTVs versus “old” recapitalized HMMWVs.

Click here for the full report (16 pages in PDF format) hosted on the website of te Federation of American Scientists.

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/weapons/RS22942.pdf

(ends)

buglerbilly
11-01-12, 12:56 PM
Wednesday, January 11, 2012, 09:17 AM

Navistar Defense to provide $880m in upgrades for MaxxPro MRAP vehicle fleet.

Navistar Defense, LLC received a $880 million delivery order today to upgrade 2,717 International® MaxxPro® Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles. The order from the U.S. Marine Corps System Command calls for MaxxPro units to be upgraded with the company's rolling chassis solution. The award also includes engineering changes, supplies and services.


Navistar International MaxxPro Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP)

"As Defense budgets are being reduced, it is imperative that we continue to develop economical solutions that repurpose assets while also working to ensure warfighters have access to emerging technologies and capabilities," said Archie Massicotte, president, Navistar Defense. "Our rolling chassis solution allows us to leverage our unique vehicle design and replace an older chassis with a new, highly mobile independent suspension chassis. During all this we keep the armored capsule intact while creating commonality through the entire MaxxPro fleet."

Under the delivery order, MaxxPro vehicles will be retrofitted with new rolling chassis. This enhancement further improves the vehicle's off-road capability with the addition of the DXM™ independent suspension, a MaxxForce® 9.3 engine, 570 amp alternator and driveline.

The company has fielded nearly 9,000 MaxxPro vehicles and continues to anticipate needed vehicle capabilities and enhancements for its entire fleet of 32,000 vehicles.

"As the operational tempo continues to impact the Army's truck fleet, we will continue to leverage our commercial infrastructure to sustain the fleet through maintenance, repair and rebuild activities," said Massicotte.

Work will begin at the company's West Point, Miss., assembly facility in January 2012 and is scheduled for completion in October 2013.

In addition to rolling chassis, Navistar is also considering new vehicle options. In October, the company unveiled its new International® Saratoga™ light tactical vehicle, which Navistar has been testing for the last year at its own expense.


Navistar Saratoga light tactical vehicle

buglerbilly
14-01-12, 04:59 AM
Iveco delivers first batch of vehicles to Switzerland

13 January 2012 - 18:25 by the Shephard News Team



Iveco Defence Vehicles has announced that it has delivered the first batch of heavy trucks to Switzerland as part of a €125 million contract signed in 2010. The company made the announcement in a 13 December 2011 statement.

Under the contract Iveco is to deliver 910 Iveco heavy trucks over the next four years, as well as providing support, project management and engineering services.

The order comprises 14 model variants, including 4x2, 4x4, 6x2, 6x6, 8x6 and 8x8 vehicles from the Stralis and Trakker heavy truck ranges. All vehicles will be fully EEV emission compliant, featuring ecological and economical FPT Industrial Cursor engines, fitted with automated EuroTronic transmissions and Automatic Drivetrain Management (ADM).

buglerbilly
19-01-12, 02:19 AM
Is 'Ford Tough' Tough Enough For DoD Acquisition

By Carlo Munoz

Published: January 18, 2012



Interesting move! When Ford owned Landrover they basically demilitarised the company and refused to develop anything further despite opportunities..................

WASHINGTON: Ford Motor Company's foray into the defense sector could be good for the Pentagon, but questions remain whether the automotive giant can navigate the complex and oft-frustrating acquisition process, according to a defense analysts.

Ford is vying against defense firms General Dynamics, Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems to build the next-generation combat truck for the Army and Marine Corps. Ford will be the third commercial-truck maker to throw its hat into the defense industry ring. Navistar and Oshkosh earned their stripes in the defense market by securing deals to build versions of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle. But Ford is the first of the three big U.S. automakers to make the leap into defense. The last major military contract held by Ford was to build the Willys-Overland Model GPW combat vehicle, better known as the Jeep, in World War II.

Ford's decision should be "welcome news" to the services and Pentagon, top defense analyst and AOL Defense contributor Loren Thompson says. Department officials have long argued that increased competition for weapons programs leads to cost savings. And throwing Ford into the JLTV mix will do just that, Thompson argues. "The Army may need more offerors to sustain real competition in the future," he said. "Having Ford available as a bidder would maintain the Army's options." Navistar and Oshkosh's success on the MRAP should be enough to assuage any doubts on whether the company can make it in the defense world.

Ford could become a major player in the defense field, but its biggest challenge will be adjusting to the cumbersome and red tape-laden military acquisition process. A process that has taken down its fair share of procurement programs. The defense acquisition process, particularly inside the Army, has "proven to be capricious and unrealistic [especially] about pricing," Thompson said. The procurement process in the commercial world -- the world where Ford and others have thrived -- is largely devoid of the pitfalls plaguing the Pentagon. That said, DoD must "permit some accommodations in requirements" in the JLTV to allow Ford to compete, David Berteau, an expert in defense management and acquisition, said. He did not go into detail on what typed of changes may be needed. Congress forced the Pentagon and the services to lower their expectations for JLTV requirements to cut costs. But lawmakers are still concerned whether the vehicle is a sound investment.

One advantage Ford does have heading into the JLTV competition is the company's new chief is well versed in the acquisition wars that go on inside the Pentagon. Ford CEO Alan Mulally was a former high-ranking official at Boeing, defense aviation expert Phil Finnegan pointed out. During his time at Boeing, Mulally was a key player in the company's campaign to land the Air Force's aerial tanker contract -- one of the most highly scrutinized DoD acquisition program next to the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. If there was anyone to lead Ford into the wilds of defense acquisition, there are very few better than Mulally, Finnegan noted

buglerbilly
19-01-12, 01:11 PM
Oshkosh awarded FHTV bridge contract

19 January 2012 - 11:35 by the Shephard News Team



Oshkosh Defense has announced that the US Army has opted to continue the company’s production and support of the Family of Heavy Tactical Vehicles (FHTV). Oshkosh was awarded a bridge contract for the work which will see the current arrangement continued until October 2013 for orders and September 2014 for deliveries.

The first order under the bridge contract was awarded 21 December 2011. It includes more than 20 HEMTT Light Equipment Transporters (LET), more than 10 PLS A1 trucks and more than 10 PLS A1 trailers. The order is valued at more than $11 million. Work under the order is scheduled to be completed in December 2013.

The Oshkosh FHTV includes the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT), Heavy Equipment Transporter (HET) and Palletized Load System (PLS). Army and National Guard soldiers have relied on these vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan, and in other missions around the world, to safely haul heavy payloads in challenging terrain and extreme conditions.

The HEMTT A4 is the backbone of the Army’s logistics and resupply fleet. It has a 13-ton payload capacity and is available in multiple variants for a wide range of operations. The PLS supports the Army’s distribution and resupply system, transporting ammunition and other critical supplies needed in battle. The HET is designed to rapidly transport battle tanks, fighting and recovery vehicles, armored vehicles, and construction equipment, as well as their crews, so they arrive in mission-ready condition.

buglerbilly
24-01-12, 12:35 AM
Exclusive: Army Kills Humvee Upgrade Program; Shifts Dollars To JLTV

By Carlo Munoz

Published: January 23, 2012



UPDATED WASHINGTON: The Army will cancel a multimillion dollar effort to upgrade its Humvee fleet and funnel those funds into the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, according to sources with knowledge of the program.

Pentagon acquisition officials spearheaded Army's decision to terminate the Modernized Expanded Capability Vehicle program -- the official moniker of the Humvee recapitalization program, sources say. The MECV cancellation will likely be part of the Army's upcoming fiscal 2013 budget plan. An Army spokesman could not confirm or deny the program's cancellation, noting internal budget deliberations are still ongoing.

Senior service leaders, including Army Secretary John McHugh and Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno, have repeatedly stated JLTV is the future of the Army's tactical vehicle fleet. The Army already decided to ramp down the -- from between 50,000 to 100,000 vehicles down to roughly 6,000 for air assault ops to make way for the JLTV's entrance into the fleet. In 2010, service officials attempted to cancel the MECV program, until Capitol Hill forced the Army to pull it off the budget chopping block.

If true, the cancellation will allow the Army to move full bore into JLTV development, using dollars from the defunct MECV effort, according to these sources. It also leaves the service without a viable backup plan, if schedule delays and cost overruns continue on the JLTV. The Humvee still plays a huge role in ongoing combat operations and is the backbone of the Army's light tactical vehicle fleet.

But Army officials had serious doubts whether industry could build an upgraded Humvee to meet the service's demands. "We have tested some of the [upgraded Humvees] already and they did not prove out," an Army official with knowledge of the program told AOL Defense last November. "We don't know if they can do it," the official said of ongoing industry efforts. MECV competitors have been working on various ways to increase the vehicle's armor and payload while keeping it light enough air assault missions. Initially, Army leaders wanted the JLTV for air assault.

But the specialized metals and material needed to get the JLTV air mobile was one of many reasons why the vehicle's costs skyrocketed. Last year, legislators scoffed at the JLTV's estimated $350,000 price tag per truck. And they made their feelings known by stripping millions from the program in the fiscal 2012 defense spending legislation. As a result, the Army and Marines rolled out a new JLTV proposal request last October, nixing the air assault and other requirements to cut the JLTV's per-unit costs down from roughly $350,000 to $270,000. But even after all that, Congress remains unconvinced the JLTV is worth the investment.

buglerbilly
25-01-12, 01:04 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

No New Humvees?

Posted by Paul McLeary at 1/24/2012 1:28 PM CST



Reports have surfaced that the Department of Defense has decided to cancel its Medium Expanded Capacity Vehicle (MECV, or Humvee recap) program, despite Congressional support for the refit that would keep the infantry workhorse rolling for another few decades. It's been a rocky road for the MECV, which has significantly complicated the Army's efforts to build brand new Joint Light Tactical Vehicles (JLTV), but it looks like the end has finally come for the program in the latest round of budget slashing.

But losing a program that lots of people in the Army and Marines didn't even really want isn't the end of the world. The real hit comes with the revelation that the Army isn’t going to be able to keep the money it would save by losing the Recap program: the cash will instead go to the Navy and Air Force. If that’s true, it would be another sign that money and influence are markedly moving away from the Army and shifting to the services that are seen as having more of a role to play in the “pivot” the Obama administration is making toward the vast blue expanses of the Asia Pacific region. It would also, of course, be a blow to the companies that were planning on bidding on the Recap program, specifically Humvee maker AM General; Textron; Oshkosh; Navistar; and BAE Systems, all of whom were looking to win the business.

Original plans called for about 60,000 Army and Marine Corps HMMWVs to receive new armor and suspension kits, among other upgrades, but that number was trimmed down to about 6,000 last fall, around the same time that the Marines said that they wouldn’t buy the rehabbed trucks, preferring instead the JLTV. The Corps’ Dan Pierson, deputy program executive officer for land systems, told reporters in October that “the business case analysis for the Marine Corps for the Recap was just not there,” since the requirements that the Marines had for the Recap “was much more robust than what the Army is trying to get out of Recap because we were trying to install a lot more mobility” with more payload capacity. According to Marine Corps studies, these requirements pushed the Recap price tag “up in the $240,000 -- $250,000 [per truck] range,” which is the same price as a brand-new JLTV which has both more payload and more capacity than the refurbished Humvees.

Just weeks before that however, the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee recommended the cancellation of the JLTV program, and transferred money out of its account and into the Humvee Recap fund. Col. David Bassett, Army program manager for tactical vehicles said at the time that cancelling the JLTV in favor of Recap would mean the Pentagon will not be able to meet all of its light vehicle needs, since Recap wouldn’t be able to meet the payload and protection thresholds that JLTV has demonstrated.

A request for proposals for an engineering and design manufacturing phase for the JLTV was due on January 20, and while it has yet to be issued, an Army spokesperson confirmed today to ARES that it is coming “soon.”

buglerbilly
25-01-12, 10:08 AM
Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 08:11 AM

Russia signed a contract with IVECO Defence Vehicles for 60 Light Multirole Vehicle Lynx LMV.

Russia signed a deal with Italy in December on the semi-knocked down assembly of 60 Lynx light multirole armored vehicles (LMV) from Iveco, Deputy Defense Minister Alexander Sukhorukov said on Tuesday, January 25, 2012.


LMV Iveco Lynx Light Multirole Vehicle of Czech Army (Credit photo Army Recognition)

“The deal was signed in December. Italy will supply kits that will be assembled at a joint enterprise in [central] Russian city of Voronezh,” Sukhorukov said.

Four vehicles were earlier acquired and brought to Russia for comparative tests with Russian analogues, he said.

“They displayed better characteristics than the vehicles we are currently using,” Sukhorukov said.

The LMV M65 is a light multirole armored vehicle developed in 2001 by Iveco Defense Vehicles. It is designed primarily for strategic and tactical mobility with a high level of protection against anti-tank and anti-personnel mines.

Russian military currently exports Tigr (Gaz-2330) light armored vehicles manufactured at Russia's Gorkovsky automobile plant (GAZ) and Arzamas machinery plant (AMZ).


Russian made GAZ-2330 Tigr armoured vehicle personnel carrier

buglerbilly
27-01-12, 12:33 AM
Ares

A Defense Technology Blog

Next Stage in JLTV Competition Is Here

Posted by Paul McLeary at 1/26/2012 10:07 AM CST



Just to add a little more flavor to an already hectic Pentagon budget day, the Army decided to release its request for proposals (RFP) for the next phase of its Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program which looks to have won the budget battle against the Modernized Expanded Capacity Vehicle, (Humvee Recap) effort.

Now that the 33-month—sped up from 48 months—Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase has kicked off, the Army says that it will award up to three contracts this summer for the delivery of 22 prototype vehicles per contract. The Army is setting an Average Unit Manufacturing Cost target at $250,000, excluding B-kit Armor and other add-on kits, which falls in line with October’s Draft RFP which called for a cost target of somewhere between $230,000 to $270,000 per vehicle. The cost target for the B-kit armor packages remains at $65k.

The October draft capped the EMD phase at $52 million per bidder, while today’s solicitation raised that number slightly, explaining that any proposal in excess of $65 million “will be considered unaffordable.” Teams fighting it out for the contract are: BAE Systems and Navistar; General Tactical Vehicles, a joint venture between General Dynamics and AM General; and Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems. Oshkosh and Navistar have both designed and built new prototypes of vehicles they want to submit for the JLTV competition, and commercial automaker Ford has also expressed interest in jumping into the fray.

Current estimates call for 50,000 vehicles for the Army and 5,500 for the USMC, though a program spokesperson emails that “planning figures are subject to change as the Services respective tactical wheeled vehicles strategies evolve, and based on available funding and service requirements.”

Now we’ll just have to wait to see what kind of money the Pentagon wants to lay out.

buglerbilly
27-01-12, 01:53 AM
Industry Pitches Humvee Upgrades To Marines, Again

By Carlo Munoz

Published: January 26, 2012



WASHINGTON: Defense firms working on the Humvee upgrade effort are setting their sights on the Marines after Pentagon officials killed the Army-led program, industry sources say.

Marine Corps officials who observed testing on some early industry designs for the Modernized Expanded Capability Vehicle -- the official moniker of the Humvee recapitalization program -- were more enthusiastic than their Army counterparts about the program, according to an industry source. Marine observers were asking questions and making suggestions on how to improve the MECV design, whereas Army observers simply "stood in the back taking notes," the source said. Humvee builder AM General, a Textron-Granite Tactical team, along with Navistar -- which builds a version of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle -- were seen as the top contenders for the MECV program.

But with the Army's decision to cancel the MECV, industry partners are looking to the Marines to breathe new life into the program. But this isn't the first time defense firms have pitched the MECV to the Corps. The Marines scuttled any idea of buying the MECV last October, but noted the Corps would be open to plucking certain elements of the program for their Humvee fleet. The MECV capabilities sought by the Army were simply overkill for the Marines, Dan Pierson, deputy program executive officer for land warfare systems, said at the time. But industry teams tied to the MECV want to take one more shot at the Corps. This last-ditch effort, if successful, will ensure the millions of industry dollars invested in MECV won't be a complete wash, according to the industry source.

The Marine Corps are facing the same difficulties with their Humvee fleet as the Army, despite the smaller size of the Marines' tactical wheeled fleet. Unlike the Army, the Marines would likely be more open to upgrading the current Humvee fleet since that solution could be fielded faster and cheaper than the next-generation JLTV, a top defense consultant noted. The Army and Marine Corps retooled the JLTV's requirements last October to cut costs on the program. The new per-truck price is roughly $230,000, which is drastically lower than the initial $350,000 per truck price. That initial price tag prompted congressional lawmakers to kill JLTV in the fiscal 2012 defense spending bill. Armed with that revamped per-unit cost, the Army issued a formal industry solicitation for JLTV development today. However, the money saved from the MECV cancellation won't be used to support the new vehicle's development.

buglerbilly
28-01-12, 10:54 AM
Army drives ahead with Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program

January 26, 2012

By Ashley John-Givens, PEO CS&CSS





WARREN, Mich. (Jan. 26, 2012) -- Today, a Request for Proposal was issued by the U.S. Army for the Engineering and Manufacturing Development phase of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program.

The Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV, family will balance critical weight and transportability constraints within performance, protection, and payload requirements -- all while ensuring an affordable solution for the Army and U.S. Marine Corps.

"Both the Army and the U.S. Marine Corps have identified critical capability gaps in their respective light tactical vehicle fleets. JLTV is the most cost-effective program to meet capability gaps for the light tactical vehicles with the most demanding missions," said Kevin M. Fahey, Program Executive Officer for Combat Support and Combat Service Support, known as PEO CS&CSS.

JLTV is a major Army-Marine Corps acquisition program for a new generation wheeled vehicle that will replace a portion of the services' Humvee fleet. The program's aim is to develop a new multi-mission light vehicle family with superior crew protection and performance compared to the Humvees.

"The Technology Development phase for this program did exactly what it was intended to do -- provide the basis for the cost-informed trades that resulted in a common Army and Marine Corps requirement. It serves as a model for how the services looking forward should operate in a cost-constrained budget environment," said William E. Taylor, Program Executive Officer Land Systems Marine Corps.

In the spring of 2011, JLTV successfully completed a 27-month Technology Development, or TD, phase -- satisfying its intended purpose of demonstrating the integration of mature technologies as a complete system and providing the Army and the Marine Corps with an assessment of the technical, performance cost and schedule risks relevant to entering the Engineering and Manufacturing Development, or EMD, Phase.

"The TD phase gave the Army and USMC exactly the kind of information we needed concur on a common base requirement, a streamlined acquisition schedule and a competitive process to ensure JLTV remains affordable," said Col. David Bassett, project manager for Tactical Vehicles.

Following submission of proposals, the Government will convene a source selection evaluation board, comprised of subject matter experts from across the Department of Defense, to review the industry proposals. The Army intends to award up to three contracts during the summer for the EMD phase for the delivery of 22 prototype vehicles per contract. Additional deliverables include ballistic structures, armor coupons, additional test assets, contractor furnished kits, trailers and data requirements.

The refined 27-month acquisition strategy is designed to put a premium on driving down costs, reducing risk and getting vehicles into the hands of warfighters quickly. The JLTV EMD contract period of performance for contractors is 27-months, while the full EMD phase will last for 33-months as the program offices ensures JLTV moves successfully from Milestone B to Milestone C.

buglerbilly
03-02-12, 09:41 AM
Via Soldier Systems blog............OMFG!

Army to Exhibit Clandestine Extended Range Vehicles at Chicago Auto Show

February 3rd, 2012



The Clandestine Extended Range Vehicle is a diesel electric hybrid built by Quantum in conjunction with the US Army’s Detroit-based Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) National Automotive Center (NAC). Funded by USSOCOM, the stealthy AWD buggy tops out at 80 MPH and can traverse 60% grades. Additionally, it is designed to fit in the CV-22.



The CERV kind of reminds me of a project I worked on in industry a few years ago. We called ours the Green Reconnaissance Vehicle. What makes this even funnier to me is an Army statement about the TARDEC CERV, “Undoubtedly, these are some of the Army’s ‘greenest’ vehicles and the kind of technology that can meet our Nation’s energy security demands.” Yes, there should be a few groans from my readers.

buglerbilly
07-02-12, 01:22 PM
Deleted - wrong thread

buglerbilly
07-02-12, 10:32 PM
Ford pulls out of JLTV competition

By Michael Hoffman Tuesday, February 7th, 2012 4:13 pm



American auto manufacturing titan Ford Motor Co. chose not to stray from the Explorer or F-150 and pulled out of the competition to build the military’s Humvee replacement Monday.

Pentagon leaders asked Ford officials to consider the possibility of joining the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle competition. Raytheon Co. and Future Force agreed to work with Ford to submit a bid. Once the three companies saw the deadlines set by the new Request for Proposals issued by the Army last month, all three companies decided to sit this one out.

“Ford, Raytheon and Future Force … have reviewed the Request for Proposal for the JLTV program and decided to pass because we are unable to meet the program’s timing requirements,: said Ford spokesman Mike Levine.

JLTV program officials received a boost of confidence when the Army chose to cancel the Humvee Recap program. Army leaders and Congress chose to go all in with the JLTV rather than spend millions to keep building off the three decade old Humvee chassis.

A defense insider speculated that Raytheon, the most experienced in defense contracts of the three, informed Ford the competition was too far ahead and the investment required to catch up would not be worth it.

Ford’s interest in the contract has defense analysts fascinated at what their manufacturing muscle could bring to the Army tactical wheeled strategy even if it means the car and truck company doesn’t compete to build the JLTV.

Ford has made significant leaps in its hybrid technology, which the Pentagon continues to show interest. If the Defense Department focused more on operations and maintenance costs for new acquisitions, which often make up 70 percent of the life cycle costs, adding hybrid technologies would be cinch for the Army and Marine Corps’ tactical wheeled modernization strategy.

However, the focus remains primarily on the per vehicle price tag meaning an expensive hybrid system doesn’t help JLTV program managers keep the JLTV’s per vehicle cost near the targeted $250,000.

Read more: http://www.dodbuzz.com/2012/02/07/ford-pulls-out-of-jltv-competition/#ixzz1ljoGYjxA
DoDBuzz.com

buglerbilly
08-02-12, 01:09 PM
Navistar Defense, Indigen Armor and SAIC Team for SOCOM Ground Mobility Vehicle Program

(Source: Navistar Defense; issued February 8, 2012)

LISLE, Ill. --- Navistar Defense, LLC, Indigen Armor and SAIC today announced they will team for the upcoming U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Ground Mobility Vehicle 1.1 (GMV 1.1) program.

The GMV 1.1 program requires a highly mobile, roll-off mission-ready platform that is transportable on a CH-47 helicopter. To support Special Operations (Specops) missions, each vehicle will be integrated with a full government furnished Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) suite.

“We are eager to team with Indigen Armor and SAIC to provide U.S. Special Operations forces with an off-road truck that possesses unprecedented mobility and is designed to be an affordable solution throughout its lifecycle,” said Archie Massicotte, president of Navistar Defense. “Navistar brings world-class truck and engine integration capabilities to the table and with our partners we will be able to provide quick-to-market products to support the needs of Special Operators.”

“As a company founded by special operations personnel to design vehicles for special operations personnel, Indigen Armor is excited to add to the subject matter expertise of Navistar and SAIC to provide the finest solution for SOCOM's GMV 1.1 requirement,” said John Choate, president of Indigen Armor and former Navy SEAL. “This team establishes a robust alliance that combines proven expertise in meeting SpecOps mobility requirements, automotive design and manufacturing, C4ISR integration, logistics support and contract management.”

Under the teaming agreements, Navistar will serve as the prime contractor for the GMV 1.1 program. Navistar and Indigen Armor will combine their automotive and Special Operations expertise with SAIC’s skill in C4ISR technologies and its ability to field and provide integrated logistics support.

“This team understands SOCOM's mission requirements and has worked well together supporting them in recent years,” said Glenn San Giacomo, SAIC senior vice president and business unit general manager. “These experiences will help us as we design, field and sustain an exceptional vehicle that has full life-cycle efficiencies designed in from the start.”

The program currently calls for the production of about 200 units per year for up to five years. A request for proposals is expected in late February 2012, with production awards expected in early January 2014.

Navistar International Corporation is a holding company whose subsidiaries and affiliates produce International brand commercial and military trucks, MaxxForce brand diesel engines, IC Bus brand school and commercial buses, Monaco RV brands of recreational vehicles, and Workhorse brand chassis for motor homes and step vans.

Indigen Armor was conceived by special operations personnel while serving in a volatile combat zone in 2004. Acquired by J.F. Lehman & Company private equity firm in 2009, the company continues to be run by military veterans with extensive Special Operations backgrounds that focus on the design and development of SpecOps mobility platforms. The company has a growing staff of professionals housed in a 267,000 square foot, state-of-the-art prototyping and manufacturing facility.

SAIC is a scientific, engineering and technology applications company that uses its deep domain knowledge to solve problems of vital importance to the nation and the world, in national security, energy & environment, health, and cybersecurity. The company's approximately 41,000 employees serve customers in the U.S. Headquartered in McLean, Va., SAIC had annual revenues of approximately $11 billion for its fiscal year ended January 31, 2011.

-ends-

buglerbilly
08-02-12, 01:13 PM
A bunch of actual and possible competitors for this programme.............here's one.......


The SRTV-5 at SOFIC 2011


Ground Mobility Vehicle System (ver 1.1) is SOCOM's concept for a new truck to replace their HMMWV-based systems currently in service. Since the solicitation is expected to kick off in September, several companies have been showing their wares. However, one company has been flying under the radar yet delivering capability for years. The Search & Rescue Tactical Vehicle (SRTV) produced by BC Customs (BCC) is in the tactical family of SXOR Mobility Vehicles. The SRTV is a platform based family of vehicle utilizing identical components with multiple body configurations. The result is a range of dimensions, crew compliments, and capabilities with no additional training or sustainment requirements.

The SRTV is constructed of MIL-STD aircraft tubing, minimizing weight, maximizing strength, and providing a skeletal base for multiple types of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) ballistic and blast armoring. BCC has utilized readily available components from the Rock/Desert racing industry with special attention paid to redundant systems required for military operations. The SRTV has produced documented speeds of over 100 mph; vertical grades over 70 degrees, side-hill angles of over 60 degrees including a vertical step of 3 plus feet. Additionally, the SRTV can exceed double its curb weight in payload. BCC has been at this for some time and has integrated all standard military vehicle requirements such as run flats, open electronics (including Tactronics' C4I system) as well as redundancy in all major operating systems.

There are weapons mount options: Fore and aft crew serve weapon mounts, 360 degree turret with roll protection, and standard swing arm mounts. BCC has also been working with Garwood Ind to integrate their M134 Minigun, FN to integrate their light Weapon Stations, and MSG for multiple weapon stations. Nicknamed the "Warthog" by users, the SRTV-5 has an internal crew of three with options for up to two additional crew and two internal (roll protected) patients. The SRTV-5 is internally loadable in the CH-53E and CH-47 with rapid ground mobility within one minute.

The SRTV-22 (Osprey) variant has an internal crew of three with options for two additional crew or two (roll protected) patients, but loses either one crew member or patient as required. The variant is designed to quickly load and unload from the V-22 with no major adjustments other than collapsing the roll protection. With practice, this can take the crew only a few seconds. The body is built to meet all V-22 tolerances, including ramp over angle and footprint. Additionally, it is less than 900 lbs per wheel, making it ideal for use as an Internally Transportable Vehicle (ITV) and can be ordered with the V-22 trailer. The ramp angle and weight per wheel issues are two of the biggest issues facing vehicle designs intended for the V-22.

In addition to SOCOM interest in a new vehicle, the USAF's Guardian Angel community recently released their third RFI in as many years looking for a specialized light rescue vehicle capable of internal and sling load transport as well as airdropability. Additionally, the RFI mentions a vehicle that can transport two PJs as well as two litter patients. BCC seems well positioned for this Guardian Angel Airdroppable Rescue Vehicle (GAARV) requirement. All SRTV variants can carry two external patients (Stokes, Israeli, Talon, or pole litters) without roll protection. Additionally, BCC is working with the Air Guard for airdrop certification.

For example, the SRTV-3 was originally designed for USAF Guardian Angel Forces in 2004 and fielded in 2007. Additionally, the SRTV was included in the Air National Guard's (ANG) FY09 Weapons Systems Modernization Requirements documents specifically for Guardian Angel use. BCC is currently working with the ANG on Airdrop and multiple MDS (aircraft type) ITV certifications to field a number of SRTV-5 and SRTV-22 variants for ANG rescue forces while awaiting the Air Combat Command (ACC) GAARV Solicitation process. BCC has recently fielded an SRTV-5 variant to the US Border Patrol special operations group BORSTAR. In addition to having an established product, they constantly work to improve existing vehicles as well as to develop new capabilities.

buglerbilly
08-02-12, 01:18 PM
This is another version, the SRTV-1..........with natty little Trailer.................

buglerbilly
08-02-12, 01:51 PM
More on this Hybrid...............fer Crissakes get a designer to give it a bit of pizzaz! :pifreak

Army bringing Detroit military muscle, efficiency to Chicago Auto Show

February 3, 2012

By John W. Wray, RDECOM


Command Sgt. Maj. Hector Marin, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, rides in a Clandestine Extended Range Vehicle at the Army Strong Zone Jan. 6, 2011, in San Antonio.

WARREN, Mich. (Feb. 3, 2012) -- The U.S. Army is sending two concept hybrid vehicles to the Chicago Auto Show to showcase its latest energy-efficiency efforts that can save money, address environmental concerns and, most importantly, save Soldiers' lives.

The U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, known as TARDEC, will display two Clandestine Extended Range Vehicles, or CERVs, from its Detroit Arsenal-based headquarters at the Chicago Army Recruiting Battalion display.

CERVs are lightweight, diesel-electric hybrid prototypes with a top speed of 80 mph. Designed for reconnaissance, targeting and rescue missions, CERVs have silent run capabilities of eight miles. Each CERV can ascend a 60 percent grade and has a torque rating of 5,000 pounds.

The CERVs boast a 25 percent fuel savings compared with conventional vehicles. TARDEC developed the vehicles with California-based Quantum Technologies.

"TARDEC's mission remains unchanged; bring the newest innovations and technology that support our troops against an ever-evolving and changing enemy threat," said Derhun Sanders, TARDEC associate director of communications. "Undoubtedly, these are some of the Army's greenest vehicles and the kind of technology that can meet our nation's energy security demands."

In terms of Soldier safety, Sanders points to a recent Army Energy Security Task Force report stating a one percent improvement in fuel economy results in 6,444 fewer Soldier trips on fuel convoys. A significant number of American casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan have resulted from guarding fuel convoys.

CERVs are being tested around the country as the finishing touches are being put on the Army's newest lab, the 30,000-square-foot Ground Systems Power and Energy Lab, or GSPEL, which will open April 11.

GSPEL is an eight-labs-in-one, state-of-the-art research and development facility. GSPEL will serve as the cornerstone for the Army's next generation of power and energy initiatives providing the Army with the cutting-edge laboratory space and equipment necessary to conduct research, development, modeling, simulation and testing on military and commercial ground vehicle of all sizes and purposes from subsystem components to entire systems-of-systems.

buglerbilly
16-02-12, 11:10 AM
Army brings prototype scout vehicle to Chicago Auto Show

February 14, 2012

By Sue Meade



CHICAGO (Army News Service, Feb. 14, 2012) -- Military vehicles are not the first image that comes to mind when thinking of an auto show, but the U.S. Army's newest concept models are among about 1,000 vehicles on display at the 2012 Chicago Auto Show.

The U.S. Army Detroit Arsenal sent a collection of today's military fleet, as well as two new concept hybrid models from its research, development and engineering center, to showcase some of the latest efforts to produce energy efficiency, save dollars, evaluate environmental concerns and save Soldier's lives.

The two Clandestine Extended Range Vehicles, or CERVs, are light-weight, diesel-electric hybrid prototypes that have been engineered for reconnaissance, targeting and rescue missions. With a top speed of 80 mph, the CERVs have a "silent run" capability of eight miles, can ascend a 60-percent grade, have a torque rating of 5,000 pounds and have a decreased fuel consumption of 25 percent over conventional models.

"The amount of fuel that we can save will reduce the amount of Soldiers that are out on convoys providing all the logistics tail that we have," said Lt. Col. Andres Contraras of TARDEC. He said using hybrid technology throughout the Army's tactical fleet could eventually eliminate the need for thousands of the Soldiers on the battlefield who are engaged in the delivery of fuel.

"This CERV vehicle an example of the hybrid technology that's good for the economy, good for the environment, [and] also good for the Army in reducing its logistic footprint," Contraras said.

The new green vehicles were developed by the Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, known as TARDEC, located in Warren, Mich., in cooperation with California-based Quantum Technologies.

The U.S. Army also works with the National Automotive Center to develop dual-use technologies with the Detroit automakers on components such as advanced suspension technologies, advanced batteries, hybrid and electric technologies and non-primary power sources like auxiliary power units.

"I think in the Army of the future, you're going to see more hybrid technology and all the green technology that the automotive industry is gearing toward," Contreras said.

(Spc. Chuck Gill from Soldiers Radio and Television contributed to this report.)

buglerbilly
16-02-12, 11:20 AM
Couple of more pics............

geof
17-02-12, 08:50 AM
.. Mini Moke on Steroids ....

buglerbilly
18-02-12, 12:25 AM
SGA2012: AM General launches right-hand drive HMMWV

14 February 2012 - 9:36 by Darren Lake in Singapore



I'd say they are 15-20 years too late.................IF this had been on offer from 1990 onwards then they might have picked up some interesting orders. Now? Nah don't think, the focus is rightly on semi-armoured/armoured Utilities with COTS-related vehicles for in-country training and "police" missions.............

US Manufacturer AM General has used the Singapore Airshow to unveil a right-hand drive version of its popular High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV). The company sees a large potential market for a right-hand drive HMMWV in the local region with a number of countries driving on the left. Singapore is an obvious target, but according to Gerritt Beck, a company spokesperson, there are some 73 countries that are right-hand drive including Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei, Australia and New Zealand. 'Of course India is the big elephant in the room,' Beck stated. 'But they're a make/buy deal. We're looking for a local partner, but we're not there yet,' he added.

Beck added that the company was happy to look at both direct commercial sales and foreign military sales for the new version of the HMMWV. 'Its up to the customer how they want to buy it,' he said. In terms of the redesign, the main elements have been moving the steering box and the battery box. The right-hand drive has gone through a full engineering development phase and it is as capable as the left-hand drive version. Beck said that the company would be offering the right-hand drive variant in all the configurations currently available.

The company is continuing to manufacture some 400 vehicles a month for both US and international left-hand drive customers. Some 58 countries have bought the HMMWV to date. Beck said that scale of production allowed the company to offer a full support service. 'You don't just get a vehicle, with us you get a partner and a whole logistics package,' he asserted.

The right-hand drive will be the most up to date configuration of a vehicle that has been constantly upgraded since its introduction in to service in 1985. 'The vehicle looks similar, but it has been completely re-engineered over that period,' Beck said. The International 205 version of the HMMWV has a 6,396kg gross vehicle weight. The vehicle's engine produces 3,400rpm and has a state of the art transmission and suspension. Beck said that as well as targeting local militaries, the company was also looking at the vehicle for a number of para-public roles, such as fire services. ''It's the type of vehicle that would be great in natural disaster relief,' he concluded.

buglerbilly
22-02-12, 11:14 AM
Oshkosh Defense to Unveil Upgraded FMTV at AUSA Winter



Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE:OSK), is continuing its commitment to further improve protection and mobility for Warfighters on the changing battlefield with new enhancements for the U.S. Army and National Guard’s Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV). The result for soldiers is better underbody protection and noticeably improved vehicle performance and ride quality on rough terrain.

Named the FMTV Enhanced Protection & Mobility Demonstrator (EPMD), the prototype vehicle utilizes the Oshkosh TAK-4® independent suspension system and a custom-fitted Oshkosh Underbody Improvement Kit (UIK) for previously unrealized levels of protection and mobility. The FMTV EPMD will be unveiled at the AUSA Winter Symposium & Exposition, Feb. 23-25 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

“We’re drawing on two Oshkosh Defense core competencies – survivability and off-road mobility – to give the FMTV platform improved capabilities on the battlefield against evolving threats and severe terrain,” said Mike Ivy, vice president and general manager of Army Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “Oshkosh has had great success delivering a high-quality FMTV fleet for our customer at a reduced cost. These upgrades build on that success and give soldiers a better protected, more mobile family of vehicles.”

The FMTV EPMD uses an Oshkosh-designed UIK to provide protection beyond the platform’s Long-Term Armor Strategy-compliant armor suite. Oshkosh is in the process of delivering more than 8,000 MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) UIKs, which are protecting Warfighters in Afghanistan today, as well as more than 400 UIKs for the Army’s Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT) A4. Oshkosh UIKs are designed for light, medium, heavy and MRAP vehicles in the ongoing battle against increasingly dangerous IEDs and roadside bombs.

The Oshkosh TAK-4 system, used on more than 20,000 medium, heavy and MRAP vehicles, delivers several improvements to the FMTV’s current configuration, including:

• Increasing the off-road profile capability from 30 percent to 70 percent
• Delivering 16 inches of front wheel travel – a 120 percent improvement
• Improving ride quality on severe terrain, allowing soldiers to arrive more refreshed for their missions
• Increasing the maximum off-road speed by nearly 20 percent

Oshkosh to date has conducted more than 6,000 miles of independent durability testing on the FMTV EPMD’s subsystems to prove their maturity and readiness for the battlefield.



Source : Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE: OSK)

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-41147/Oshkosh_Defense_to_Unveil_Upgraded_FMTV_at_AUSA_Wi nter.htm#ixzz1n6leUlyu

buglerbilly
23-02-12, 01:42 PM
Saturday, February 18, 2012, 08:33 AM

ACMAT unveils a new generation of armoured vehicle the Bastion Patsas at IAV 2012

ACMAT a leader in the international defence industry for the development, design, and manufacture of combat armoured vehicles and light trucks adapted to new missions of the armies in the world, and current and futur threats of all the new theaters of operations. At International Armoured Vehicles 2012, ACMAT presents its new range of tactical combat vehicles, the BASTION Patsas, the ALTV and the VLRA Commando.
Visit ACMAT at IAV 2012 stand C-20 - Hall.


ACMAT its new range of Special Operations vehicles from left to right:
BASTION PATSAS, VLRA Commando and ALTV Open Cab

ACMAT Special Operations vehicles

With the BASTION PATSAS, the ALTV Open cab series Torpedo and the VLRA Commando, ACMAT provides a unique and comprehensive solution to operating autonomously with a maximum degree of tactical mobility and offensive power to Special Operations Forces units.

Based on 60 years of military experience in the rugged and hostile environment of Africa and Middle East, the new BASTION PATSAS is specifically designed to meet the high levels of mobility, armour protection, payload and survivability in the most extreme drving conditions. Open-top, this special feature allows the deployment of heavy weapon and missile platforms, the fitting of reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition systems as well as performing check-point missions and any special operations. The features of the BASTION PATSAS combine the famous rigid all-welded steel chassis and field-proven technologies to challenge all the theaters of operations.


ACMAT Bastion PATSAS Special Operations vehicle

The new Armoured Personnel Carrier of ACMAT

The BASTION APC transports ten people fully protected up to the level 3, STANAG 4569. The V-shaped, anti-mine and high-volume monoshell of 9 m3 operates many fire support and self-protection systems. The BASTION APC is the armoured survivable solution to transport within protection armed troops and various weapon applications in the same mission.


The new ACMAT Bastion APC armoured personnel carrier

ACMAT S.A.S. is a subsidiary of Renault Trucks Defense, is the manufacturer of the famous VLRA, which is in service with over 1,200 units in the French Army. ACMAT has dozens of customers for its range of tactical, logistical and armoured vehicles (ALTV, VLRA and Bastion) in Africa, Middle East and Europe.

Commitment to Quality

Providing all the services for a full life-cycle support, ACMAT ensures a secured logistic for all the spare parts. The Maintenance in Operational Conditions allows a significant reduction in term of ownership cost. From delivery to reconditioning programs, ACMAT provides its clients and partners a complete engineering support, which guarantees their vehicles to operate at full capability worldwide.

buglerbilly
23-02-12, 01:45 PM
Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 06:01 PM

Nimr 6x6 Armoured Patrol Vehicle equipped with DRS Systems Technologies on display at IAV 2012

Abu Dhabi-based Nimr Automotive, a subsidiary of Tawazun Holding, is currently exhibiting at the 11th Annual International Armoured Vehicles (IAV) conference and exhibition being held at FIVE, Farnborough, UK (20th to 23rd Feb 2012).


NIMR 2 6x6 wheeled armoured cargo vehicle United Arab Emirates defence industry

The first ever UAE company to appear at International Armoured Vehicles, Nimr develops and manufactures a wide range of interoperable defence vehicles that feature high power delivery, high mobility, high versatility and high protection levels.

These multi-mission vehicles are designed and manufactured for applications that range from tactical missions in harsh environments, such as arid deserts, to modern urban warfare, deep infiltration missions, reconnaissance, border surveillance, and support logistics. Depending on the configuration required by the customer, they can perform a variety of roles, including armament or personnel carrier, logistics vehicle, ambulance, and Command and Control vehicle.

Under a Memorandum of Agreement between Nimr and DRS Technologies, part of the Finmeccanica Group, DRS Technologies, is equipping Nimr vehicles with tactical vehicle electronics, electro-optics, vehicle power management and tactical communications. This combination of Nimr’s vehicle engineering capacity and DRS Technologies’ systems and integration skills can equip these vehicles to deliver world class C4ISTAR solutions, including battle management, close-in situational awareness, reconnaissance and surveillance, and secure vehicle and tactical communications. In partnership with other Finmeccanica businesses, DRS can also integrate highly effective electronic countermeasures against the IED threat as well as a range of stabilised overhead weapon systems capable of meeting most of the operational scenarios the vehicles are likely to encounter.

On display at International Armoured Vehicles is the Armoured Patrol Vehicle – 6x6 (pictured) fitted with systems provided by DRS and its sister companies Oto Melara and Selex Elsag.

Speaking at the International Armoured Vehicles conference, Mr Hamad Al Neyadi, Chief Strategic Officer of Tawazun and Chairman of Nimr Automotive, drew attention to the vision of Nimr which is to establish a globally recognised and sustainable defence automotive business, contributing to the diversification of the UAE economy and enhancing local skills and experience. Full production, assembly and quality management facilities are being installed at Nimr’s Abu Dhabi plant and comprehensive lifecycle management capabilities are already in place.

To date, over 509 Nimr vehicles have been delivered, including both the 4x4 and 6x6 versions, and an order book of 1800 plus.

buglerbilly
24-02-12, 11:48 AM
AUSA 2012: Oshkosh spotlights potential FMTV recap design

24 February 2012 - 9:52 by Scott Gourley in Fort Lauderdale, USA



A bit more on this............

Reflective of the US Army’s shift from a vehicle procurement focus to the planning of potential recapitalisation of existing fleets, Oshkosh Defense used AUSA Winter 2012 to highlight a number of Family of Medium Tactical Vehicle (FMTV) design improvements optimised for installation into existing early model systems.

According to George Mansfield, senior director of medium tactical vehicles at Oshkosh Defense, the company currently has approximately 19,000 FMTV trucks and 9,500 associated trailers on contract.

‘But we’re always looking for ways to enhance the product,’ he noted. ‘So this truck design, called Enhanced Protection and Mobility Demonstrator (EPMD), has the Oshkosh TAK-4 independent suspension system, which we used to increase axle ratings so that we could provide for improved survivability. We did that by installing an underbelly kit that improves the blast protection.’

‘We also put some better, enhanced blast mitigation seats and blast mitigation floor mats inside to improve survivability,’ he added. ‘And to do that we had to go with a bigger front axle, since this has got the B-kit on it already and this composite underbelly kit further improves that level of protection. Independent suspension also gives the soldier more mobility, with about 16 inches of wheel travel on the front axle and about 13 inches on the rear axle. So now he can get places he couldn’t get before and have improved survivability that he didn’t have before.’

Asked about the potential of this design for a future reset or recapitalisation activity, Mansfield described the features as ‘the perfect kit for them to put on as they brings trucks back from theater or they want to reset or recap their older A1 models – probably not the A0s because they have a smaller frame on them. But the A1s we could recap to this configuration. That’s definitely what we are looking to do.’

buglerbilly
24-02-12, 11:17 PM
AUSA 2012: Navistar, DRS and Allison spotlight new logistics platform and power generation

24 February 2012 - 20:39 by Scott Gourley in Fort Lauderdale, USA



Navistar and DRS Technologies combined capabilities to break multiple logistics paradigms with a new platform application and onboard power generation design at AUSA Winter 2012.

Under the theme of ‘revitalising existing assets for a new mission,’ Gordon Wolverton, director of MaxxPro programmes at Navistar Defense offered an overview of the company’s new MaxxPro Utility Truck.

‘When you stand back and look at it you have basically a fully armored MRAP protected vehicle with up to a seven ton payload capability,’ he explained, adding that the lineage behind the design can be traced to the company’s recent contract award for 2700 ‘rolling chassis.’

‘Those are to go upgrade the MaxxPro base,’ he said. ‘And the result of that is you will have a refurbished MaxxPro base with independent suspension capabilities. But you also have the leftover residual chassis – in particular chassis like this one, which is a beam axle. Some of the old chassis should be discarded but others still may have life in them. So the question we keep getting involves what to do with those “somewhat good” chassis.’

He continued, ‘Our suggestion is the Utility Truck. And what we did is basically re-apply the building blocks of the MaxxPro family. We take the chassis; that’s the cab from our recently-sold wrecker; that’s a flatbed from the commercial world; and now you have a 7-ton pickup truck with full armored protection.’

In addition to the flatbed design, other concepts range from engineer contact vehicle to lightweight wrecker. The MRAP level protection cab could also be replaced with a commercial unarmored cab design if that more closely met user requirements.

‘And that value proposition would cost roughly 1/3 of the cost of a new vehicle,’ Wolverton said. ‘So we can repurpose / re-mission a vehicle and now we have a whole new avenue with MRAP level protection.’

Further expanding on the logistics significance of the prototype design was an exportable power generation capability that had been integrated inside the Allison 3000-series transmission.

The system can provide up to 120 kW of power with specific outputs customisable to meet specific user applications.

‘From the vehicle integration side it’s wonderful for me, because most onboard power generation designs are “pancaked” between the flywheel and the transmission, which starts to alter the driveline. But with integrated inside the transmission this I can take the old transmission out and put the new transmission in with no further modifications to the driveline. That’s huge – because vehicle integration is now much, much simpler. And I can do this on any of my MaxxPro family.’

The utility truck with power generation capability is being offered by the companies as a candidate for system under evaluation at Network Integration Evaluation (NIE) 13.1.

‘We’re also offering to install one of these systems into a government-provided MaxxPro Dash,” Wolverton added.

buglerbilly
25-02-12, 12:55 AM
Friday, February 24, 2012, 04:14 PM

Belgian subsidiary of Thales presents its expertise at IAV 2012 with the Dingo 2 PRV.

The Belgian subsidiary of Thales Group presents its expertise at IAV 2012 with the integration of communication and surveillance systems for the battlefield on an armored Dingo 2 Protected Reconnaissance Vehicle (PRV) of the Army of Luxembourg. The Dingo 2 PRV of the Luxembourg army is currently deployed in Afghanistan with NATO troops in the ISAF mission.


Dingo 2 PRV Protected Reconnaissance Vehicle of Luxembourg Army with Thales optronic and communication systems at International Armoured Vehicles 2012

In march 2008, The German Defence Company Krauss-Maffei Wegmann announced the order for the delivery of 48 Dingo 2 to Luxembourg's armed forces.

At the end of 2010, Thales and KMW delivered 48 vehicles Dingo 2 and their electronics. The Luxembourg Army’s Protected Reconnaissance Vehicle (PRV) contract called for a tactical reconnaissance vehicle “that is particularly well suited to allied operations” such as NATO’s ISAF mission in Afghanistan.

The vehicles will carry an array of Thales communication equipment (PR4G, TRC 3700 HF), a tactical situation awareness system (T-BMS) “blue force tracker” type system, an extensible mast with a small reconnaissance turret, a dismounted surveillance system with Sophie MF handheld thermal cameras, and Kongsberg’s Protector remotely-operated machine-gun turret. Thales’ Open Information Communication System will serve as the underlying tie that connects these systems together.



1. Armored DINGO 2 platform for high mobility & crew protection against mines, ballistic impacts,improvised explosive devices (IED) and NBC threats.

2. Commander position providing Full Situation Awareness. The VESTA On Platform Computer (OPC)
connects the various sub systems to each other to fulfill all the mission requirements. The OPC interacts with the Advanced Mission System to prepare, carry out and debrief the mission. The mission system includes the Battlefield Management System supported by a robust Navigation System (GPS + Inertial Platform) and the Platform Management System with main status of all sub systems on a single 15" touch screen.

3. Tactical Platform Intercommunication System providing Voice & Data VHF and HF Networks between PRV platforms and the next level of command.

4. Remote Controlled Weapon Station with .50 machine gun, IR + daylight observation modules on a stabilized platform.

5. Wired access for remote control of radios and vehicle tactical LAN extension.

6. Left and right Laser Warning Receivers providing 360° coverage.

7.Multi Media Communication Means including GSM, Iridium and provisions for UHF.

8. Optronic Head (Margot 5000) with Thermal Imager, CCD camera and Laser Range Finder on a 4 m collapsible mast. When the mast is collapsed inside the mission cargo, nothing identifies the vehicle as a Recce platform. The optronic sub system is remotely operated from the observer's position inside the protected cell of the vehicle.

9. Remote Controlled Handheld Thermal Imager (Sophie MF I Margot 3000) deployable up to 50 m from the vehicle.

10. Interchangeable Mission Cargo with fast fitting and removal to adapt payload to different mission requirements.

buglerbilly
25-02-12, 11:26 AM
Saturday, February 25, 2012, 11:47 AM

First export contract for the 4x4 French Nexter Aravis armoured vehicle for Saudi Arabia.

Laurent Collet-Billon Delegate General for the French Armaments Procurement Agency (DGA) confirmed this Monday, February 20, 2012 during the presenting of the DGA 2011 results, that the French Defence Company manufacturer Nexter has signed a contract in late 2011 with Saudi Arabia, for "between 100 and 200" ARAVIS 4 x 4 armoured vehicle.


The Nexter Aravis is a high mobility 4x4 protected multi-mission vehicle intended for land forces in scenarios such as Iraq and Afghanistan

This is the first export contract for the high protected armoured vehicle Aravis, which has been designed, developed and manufactured by Nexter. The vehicle was unveiled in 2008 at the International Defence Exhibition Eurosatory in paris, France.

An order for 15 ARAVIS vehicles was placed by the Délégation Générale pour l'Armement (French army procurement agency DGA) in April 2009 for use by the French Army as a reconnaissance and escort vehicle for engineer units. The Aravis is currently in use by the French armed forces in Afghanistan.

In July 2006, Saudi Arabia has placed an order for 80 CAESAR 155mm wheeled self-propelled howiter which are also manufactured by The French Company Nexter.

The vehicle ARAVIS for Saudi Arabia should be equipped with a remote weapons system armed with a 20mm Nexter gun ARX-20.

buglerbilly
25-02-12, 11:32 AM
This is the so-called Fire Support version equipped with the Nexter 20mm gun...............

buglerbilly
28-02-12, 01:08 PM
Army Keeps Humvee Fleet Alive, Presses Ahead With JLTV

By Carlo Munoz

Published: February 27, 2012



FT. LAUDERDALE: With the Army's Humvee modernization plan a thing of the past, service leaders now plan to pour billions into sustaining what's left of the venerable combat truck fleet.

The current roster of combat-ready Humvees in the Army's arsenal is "still sustainable" to carry out a wide range of missions, from air assault ops to humanitarian and disaster relief, Kevin Fahey, the program executive officer for combat support and combat service support, said last Thursday. But keeping the fleet at that level of readiness "for the sustainable future" will take some investment on the Army's part, he told reporters during last week's Association of the U.S. Army's annual symposium here. To that end, Army leaders plan to shift the remaining funds from the Modernization Expanded Capability Vehicle program -- the official name of the Humvee upgrade effort -- into vehicle sustainment, Army Project Manager for Tactical Vehicles Col. David Bassett said at the same event.

Pentagon acquisition officials spearheaded Army's decision to terminate MECV program earlier this month, as part of the Army's fiscal 2013 budget plan. The Army already decided to ramp down the MECV program -- from 50,000 to 100,000 vehicles down to roughly 6,000 for air assault missions -- to make way for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle's entrance into the fleet. Senior service leaders, including Army Secretary John McHugh and Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno, have repeatedly stated JLTV is the future of the Army's tactical vehicle fleet.

With the MECV cancellation, the air assault mission will now be filled by the JLTV and unarmored versions of the Humvee, Bassett said. The JLTV can be airlifted alongside Army airborne troops in "standard conditions", according to Bassett. For missions where the vehicles need to be inserted at high altitudes or in sweltering heat -- or basically the "high and hot" conditions in Afghanistan -- uparmored Humvees will be used. However, those vehicles will not have the same level of protection as the JLTV or the now-defunct MECV against roadside bombs. The Army's answer? They simply will not use the uparmored Humvees in air assault missions where improvised explosive devices may be used, Bassett said. How exactly the Army plans to avoid IEDs, which have become the No. 1 cause of casualties for U.S. and coalition forces, during high-and-hot air assaults, Bassett did not say. One thing he and Fahey did say is the Army can't waste anymore time getting the JLTV into the field.

"The number one risk to a program is time," Fahey said on the Army's ongoing JLTV work. His comments come weeks after Ford Motor Company dropped its bid for the next-generation combat vehicle. Ford claims the Army's inability to extend its deadline for design proposals essentially forced the company out of the running. For their part, Ford officials never expressed the need for more time -- up to 12 months -- to Army officials until the proposals request was issued earlier this year, Fahey said. If program officials had conceded to Ford's request, it would put the rest of the JLTV competitors at a disadvantage, Bassett said. "We have to consider the industry as a whole," he added.

buglerbilly
29-02-12, 12:09 PM
Industry ready now for JLTV



Industry bidders will respond March 13 to the most recent government request for solutions to modernize the light tactical vehicle fleet -- and they don't need any more time than that to do so, because they are prepared now.

"Industry... they don't need another two years to design this vehicle," said Col. Dave Bassett, the project manager for Army tactical vehicles. "They are ready now to respond with mature designs to our solicitation."

Bassett, along with Kevin M. Fahey, the Army's program executive officer for combat support and combat service support, spoke Feb. 23 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., during a media opportunity at the Association of the U.S. Army's Institute of Land Warfare's Winter Symposium and Exposition Feb. 23.

"I have not seen substantial pressure to slow this program down," Bassett said. "The feedback we have got from industry confirmed we have folks prepared to bid mature designs now."

Fahey agreed. He said that industry is ready to present their options for the JLTV, and that the Army and Marine Corps program is structured as-is with current budget considerations in mind.

"One of the No. 1 things is keep it focused, and from an Army and Marine Corps perspective, the program now as structured and the schedule we [are] on is also consistent with our fiscal constraints on how we are going to fund the capability we need over time."

The Army released Jan. 26 the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle engineering and manufacturing development phase request for proposal. Industry has until March 13 to respond.

Bassett said in the JLTV technology development phase, the program got criticism because it was changing requirements and the schedule was slipping, but he said the TD phase "did exactly what it was intended to do, which is it gave us an opportunity to learn about our requirements, and learn the relationships between those requirements and costs." It also allowed the Army to focus on the capability gaps that had to be satisfied by the JLTV -- protected mobility and restoring capability that was lost by having added armor to the Humvee.

"We came out of that with an industrial base that had learned a lot and had benefitted from a round of competitive prototyping," he said. Having built prototypes, he said, industry learned key capabilities of the vehicle and also learned of the challenges of developing the JLTV. "They came out a whole lot better prepared to make the adjustments and requirements necessary to end up with the program that we have an RFP out on the street for today."

HUMVEE WAY AHEAD

The latest budget proposal has not provided funding for the "Modernized Expanded Capability Vehicle" program, or MECV program. The MECV program was to modernize the Humvee.

Fahey said, however, that the Humvee is still suitable to do its mission -- many of those missions inside the United States. There will be a "sustainment program for the HUMVEE fleet for the foreseeable future," he said, that includes less a of a focus on survivability of the Humvee fleet, and more on cost effectiveness and fuel efficiency. "We're going to be sustaining that fleet for quite a while, there will be times in its life it has to go back to the depots for some kind of reset."

By C. Todd Lopez

Source : US Army

Published on ASDNews: Feb 29, 2012

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-41273/Industry_ready_now_for_JLTV.htm#ixzz1nlvCDRRA

buglerbilly
01-03-12, 04:42 AM
Treated to the early morning delight of seeing 2 x 6x6 Nary Supacats speeding up the Mitchell Freeway at just before 7.00AM this morning...........seemed like only a driver on board wearing what looked like FR Coveralls in an olive green colour, olive tarpaulins throw over whatever was in the back. Both drivers were wearing full helmets ala armoured crew helmets. Spaced a couple of hundred metres apart.......

They are NOT small.............not massive but not small.

buglerbilly
03-03-12, 02:24 AM
SUVs of Death: Commandos Want Missiles in Their Trucks

By Spencer Ackerman Email Author March 2, 2012 | 1:00 pm


An SUV is loaded onto a C-17 headed for Haiti. Photo: New York National Guard

This is the counterterrorist car chase of the future.

Somewhere in East Africa or the southern Arabian peninsula, several years from now, an unassuming SUV drives off the road and rolls down its window. From the passenger seat, there’s a blast as a missile shoots into the air. It careens as far as 60 miles, in pursuit of terrorists traveling in their own SUVs, who’ll never see the light truck that launched it.

This is a future that the U.S. Special Operations Command wants as it fights the nation’s shadow wars in places like Somalia and Yemen. A new solicitation seeks what it calls a “Medium Range Precision Strike System.” Obscured within that anodyne phrase is an ambitious weapons system optimized for stealthy strikes with minimal footprints — for those times when a drone strike just isn’t the right tool for the job.

The missile system the commandos want fits into a “light, commercially available truck.” The whole thing has to be completely self-contained within the SUV, weighing no more than 900 lbs. — as much as five 180 lb. dudes, sans gear — and no longer than 200 inches. “All cables, power sources, fire control and any other required accessories” have to be packed in as well, because the missile system has to open fire from the open road. You might want to call shotgun.

That’s because the target is often on the move, as well. “The enemy vehicles could be stationary or moving commercial SUVs, pick-ups, or sedans,” reads the solicitation. And they could be way, way far away: The missiles need an “objective maximum range of not less than one hundred (100) kilometers,” or about 62 miles.

If the desired missile system actually does make it into the light trucks of elite troops, it would unite the two principal tools for prosecuting the U.S.’s “shadow wars” against terrorists: missile strikes and commando raids. Usually those strikes come either from cruise missiles or overhead drones. But the Special Operations Command missile wouldn’t be purely surface-to-surface. “It is highly desirable that the system be compatible with various fixed and rotary wing aircraft,” the solicitation reads.

Except for the airborne part, the missile in the car follows in a long special-operations tradition: biting the very styles of the insurgents, terrorists and guerrillas the commandos hunt. Terrorists have used RPGs fired from the backs of flatbed trucks as portable artillery weapons for years. In Iraq, some jury-rigged wheelbarrows to construct mobile rocket launchers.

We’re also about a decade into the trend of modifying SUVs for warfare. A Texas company specializes in inserting Kevlar, steel and polyethylene composite plates around the frames of light trucks soon to pass through dangerous territory. Others have gone the Michael Bay route, attaching a 12.7 mm machine gun to a GMC Yukon.

There’s nothing in the solicitation that suggests the Special Operations Command wants the SUV itself to be modified. Instead, it seems more like the vehicle is incidental — the kind of thing that commandos who don’t want to attract attention can jump into, without indicating to the outside world that they’re packing the kind of firepower that can wipe out a target while he’s on the move from as far away as New York City is from Trenton.

buglerbilly
06-03-12, 11:39 AM
Tuesday, March 6, 2012, 08:52 AM

New 4x4 light tactical vehicle for the Malaysian armed forces the Weststar GSC 3/4 ton.

Looks like a HILUX to me............ :confused:

The Malaysian Defence Minister is saying that the Weststar Group had been given the contract for new 4X4 vehicles for the Armed Forces. Weststar GSC 3/4 ton provides arm forces with vehicles that are designed to meet a wide range of security and defence roles.


Weststar GSC 3/4 ton new 4x4 light tactical vehicle for Malaysian armed forces

The vehicle is purpose built.The GSC is available in hard or soft top, flexible enough for transportation of personnel, cargo and general utility.

The Weststar GSC 3/4 ton is powered by a robust and powerful 3.0 litre TDI diesel engine. The power train is common with that fitted to most commercial vehicles in the market,giving high commonality of parts and simpler maintenance and logistic support. Excellent value for money in all aspects of operations make them the rational choice for cost effectiveness.

buglerbilly
08-03-12, 12:44 PM
Pentagon contends with surplus of armored trucks

By Marjorie Censer, Thursday, March 8, 6:20 AM

Poorly thought out article on a well-known "problem" that isn't............the USA AND Mexico could do with a bunch of trucks in the border areas, well made tracks and metalled roads are not going to be a prblem for even the older MRAP's. A whole bunch of countries in Africa could do with hundreds and hundreds, Uganda, Nigeria, "friends" in Somalia, Ethiopia and Southern Sudan to mention but a few.........give them 15-20% extra to use as a Spares source and you have a 10-year life fleet.........

Of all the military equipment that streamed into Iraq in the past decade, there is perhaps no item more iconic than the MRAP — the heavily armored truck that was rushed into the country as casualties from roadside bombings grew.

But with tens of thousands of MRAPs on hand and no assurance of much new funding to store and maintain the vehicles, the military is struggling to determine what to do with them.

The Obama administration has made clear that it no longer wants to conduct “stability operations” — the term used to describe the kind of war that the military has fought in Iraq and Afghanistan, blending military operations with diplomacy and peacekeeping. Instead, the administration is looking to a lighter, smaller and more technologically capable military to conduct specific missions.

In this context, the MRAP — or mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicle — is something of a relic, bought specifically to protect soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan but far too bulky for a future characterized by drones, cyberwarfare, and intelligence and surveillance technology.

“Threats drive demand for military goods, but there’s so many different types of threats that it’s very unlikely that what worked in one war will be well suited for the next,” said Loren Thompson, a defense industry consultant.

The MRAP’s signature V-shaped undercarriage helped deflect the impact of blasts from improvised explosives and made the armored vehicle exactly what troops needed in Iraq. In 2007, the military began ordering almost 28,000 MRAPs, most of which went to Iraq, though some were designed for Afghanistan and its more challenging terrain.

The military had little intention of keeping the vehicles over the long term. But to get them to the battlefield as quickly as possible, the Pentagon ordered multiple versions from six manufacturers, drawing from the war funding appropriated by Congress.

“At the time we bought MRAP, it was pretty clear to most people that this was a short-term buy for the current wars,” said David Berteau, senior adviser and director of the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ defense -industrial initiatives group.

But, Berteau said, “when you buy that many variants, it becomes a long-term nightmare.”

What to do with the vehicles now is a complicated matter, particularly for the Army, which owns most of the MRAPs, and the Marine Corps, which has a sizable number.

The services are concerned about the cost of maintaining the vehicles, estimated by program officials at $10,000 to $20,000 a year for each vehicle overseas. But the services are also reluctant to write off equipment they own and have used successfully, particularly as the defense budget declines and fewer vehicles are purchased.

The military is paying a high price to keep MRAPs up and running. Last year, Navistar Defense received a $133.7 million contract to service vehicles in Afghanistan and Kuwait, and Fairfax County-based ManTech received a contract this year worth up to $507 million over 10 months to repair battle-damaged MRAPs and make upgrades.

Once the vehicles are off the battlefield, maintaining them is expected to cost less, but they will still require regular maintenance, such as checking fluids and batteries.

David Hansen, program manager with the office set up to manage the MRAP initiative, said none of the military services has decided how many to keep. Although the Army has completed two studies on the issue, one of its top officials recently sent staff “back to the drawing table” to take another look, he said.

The military will certainly keep some for training at U.S. bases so troops know how to operate them, but most of the vehicles will probably be placed in some form of war reserve. Older models that haven’t been upgraded are likely to be shed, Hansen said.

The Defense Department will consider selling some of the vehicles to foreign countries or moving them to other federal agencies. Under one idea, some could be used by units patrolling the nation’s borders.

“President Obama’s mantra for the future is versatility, flexibility, agility,” Thompson said. “None of those things sounds like an MRAP.”

buglerbilly
10-03-12, 01:54 AM
DoD pushes back deadline for JLTV bids

By Michael Hoffman Thursday, March 8th, 2012 12:55 pm



Army and Marine Corps leaders have pushed back by two weeks the date for competitors to respond to the Joint Light Tactical Vehicles request for proposals, even after officials have touted the program’s recent success.

JLTV officials released the RFP on Jan. 26 and gave defense companies until March 13 to respond. Service officials have since pushed back the due date for bids on competing the engineering and manufacturing development phase to March 27.

“The extension was given to allow all potential offers time to respond to the current RFP requirements, and to address forthcoming additional proposal requirements for offerors to submit agreements with Non-Government Organizations who will be involved in a technology readiness assessment in support of a Milestone B decision,” said Army Col. Dave Bassett, the project manager for Army Tactical Vehicles.

The decision to delay the RFP response date comes as something of a surprise after Bassett said Feb. 23 the defense industry was ready to design the JLTV.

“Industry, they don’t need another two years to design this vehicle. They are ready now to respond with mature designs to our solicitation,” Bassett said at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Winter Symposium.

Three competitors will receive contracts for the EMD phase to be awarded in May. A cost ceiling of $52 million was set for the EMD phase per contractor. The production phase contract is not expected until 2015.

The Army and Marine Corps surprised many upon the release of the RFP after program officials slashed the cost ceiling for the Humvee replacement by about $100,000 per vehicle. The ceiling dropped from $350,000 to $250,000 after officials from both services agreed to relax weight requirements.

Army and Marine Corps leaders told House lawmakers on Thursday that JLTV was in great shape. They reassured a House Armed Services Committee panel that the vehicles would be strong enough to protect tomorrow’s troops from roadside bombs, but be light enough to ride aboard Navy warships or be slung under helicopters up to certain altitudes.

William Taylor, the Marine Corps’ program executive officer for land systems, said JLTV also was a model of acquisition reform.

“We have a firm handle on the program now, by virtue of what we went through in the technology demonstration phase,” he said. “This program has been a model in terms of doing everything Congress and OSD had asked it to do.”

That includes “streamlining the timeline to get to production,” which Taylor said had been cut in half from 32 months to 16 months.

Three defense teams have already built JLTV prototypes and a fourth, Oskosh Defense, has said it also will submit a bid for the EMD phase. The AM General-General Dynamics, Lockheed Martin-BAE Armor Holdings and Navistar Defense-Northrop Grumman teams are considered the front-runners.

Ford has also shown interest, but the auto giant has said it did not have time to submit in the timeframe set out by the RFP. Members of Congress have come to Ford’s aid, asking Army officials to make concessions in the competition to allow Ford to compete.

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., told Army leaders on Feb. 17 at a House Armed Services Committee hearing that Ford could offer Joint Marine-Army Vehicle for $225,000 per copy featuring more armor at less overall weight.

Army Secretary John McHugh responded saying it would be unfair and potentially illegal to alter the competition to fit one company’s needs.

“It would be a very tenuous decision to pull back an RFP based on a single manufacturer saying what they may or may not be able to do when they chose not to compete. Now, Ford can submit at any time during the process an unsolicited program that we’ll fully consider. But we can’t pull plugs on developmental programs where everybody else is playing by the same rules because a single competitor — as great as Ford is — says here’s what we promise you we’re going to do. It’s just, I think, would be a bad precedent to set,” McHugh said.

Army Lt. Gen. Bob Lennox, a top modernization official, conceded to the HASC panel on Thursday that JLTV “will not be a cure-all — it won’t replace everything on the battlefield.” The Army and Marines still want their other, heavier vehicle programs, including the Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle and the Marines’ planned new amphibious vehicle.

Read more: http://www.dodbuzz.com/2012/03/08/dod-pushes-back-deadline-for-jltv-bids/#ixzz1ofthWqED
DoDBuzz.com

buglerbilly
15-03-12, 02:06 PM
Russia to Get First 57 Italian Armored Vehicles in 2012

(Source: RIA Novosti; issued March 14, 2012)

MOSCOW --- The Russian Armed Forces will take delivery of the first 57 Italian Lince (Lynx) light multirole armored vehicles (LMV) before the end of the current year, Defense Ministry press secretary Irina Kovalchuk said on Wednesday.

“These machines will go primarily to the Southern Military District,” she said. The district incorporates Russia’s troubled North Caucasus republics.

Russia signed a deal with Italy’s Iveco company in December on the semi-knocked down assembly of Lynx vehicles in the central Russia city of Voronezh.

Localization of production at the Voronezh plant is currently 10 percent, Kovalchuk said, adding that by 2014 it is to reach 50 percent.

Lynx is a light multirole armored vehicle developed in 2001 by Iveco Defense Vehicles. It ensures high mobility and protection against anti-tank and anti-personnel mines.

-ends-

buglerbilly
15-03-12, 10:53 PM
Navistar Defense wins MRAP work

15 March 2012 - 16:41 by the Shephard News Team



Navistar Defense has announced that it has been issued with an award to conduct the installation work associated with its January order to upgrade 2,717 International MaxxPro Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles with a new vehicle chassis. Issued by the US Army Contracting Command, the $21 million contract was announced 15 March 2012.

Navistar said they are focused on increasing the capabilities of the existing fleet with minimal impact to defence funding with the work. This will involve developing new solutions to fully utilise existing assets.

Should the government be interested in reusing its remaining vehicle chassis, Navistar can add an armoured cab to the chassis or return the vehicle to a commercial flatbed truck by adding a standard commercial cab for roughly a third of the cost of a new vehicle. Additional variants that can be produced on this building-block model include a recovery vehicle and a utility truck with an integrated capability for exportable power generation.

The company has fielded nearly 9,000 MaxxPro vehicles and continues to anticipate needed vehicle capabilities, enhancements, reset and reuse options for its entire fleet of 32,000 vehicles.

The retrofits will be conducted in West Point, Miss., and work is expected to be completed by the end of May 2012.

buglerbilly
24-03-12, 02:35 AM
Textron, General Kinetics sign MOU for Canadian TAPV bid

23 March 2012 - 17:00 by the Shephard News Team



Textron Systems Canada has announced that it has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with General Kinetics for possible work on the Textron Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) for the Canadian Forces. The agreement was announced 21 March 2012.

Textron has submitted a proposal to supply 500 vehicles to the Canadian Army with an option for up to 100 additional TAPVs, all to be outfitted with shock absorbers designed for military use by General Kinetics, a 100 employee small business in southern Ontario. If awarded the TAPV contact, Textron Systems Canada will become the prime contractor for the programme.

General Kinetics has designed and manufactured high performance suspension systems and components to meet the unique needs of the worldwide military vehicle market from its facility in Brampton, Ontario, for more than 30 years. The Textron TAPV would be equipped with General Kinetics armoured vehicle grade shock absorbers.

The Textron TAPV bid draws on the company's more than 45 years of experience in the design and production of armoured vehicles. A technology readiness level 8 vehicle, if selected, the Textron TAPV will provide the Canadian Forces with the optimal balance of survivability, mobility and versatility, while delivering outstanding performance in the world's most challenging environments. Extensively tested to confirm ballistic, blast, mobility and reliability levels, the Textron TAPV has been engineered to meet and exceed Canada's requirements.

buglerbilly
27-03-12, 12:29 PM
BAE Systems-Led Team to Submit Proposal for JLTV EMD Phase



BAE Systems, along with teammates Northrop Grumman and Meritor Defense, announced today that they plan to submit tomorrow a proposal for the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program.

“We kept the best from the Technology Development phase and applied it to our EMD vehicles, and we’ve made refinements to perform even better,” said Glenn Lamartin, BAE Systems JLTV Capture Lead. “Our JLTVs are protected and survivable, light enough for transport by air or sea, and agile on road and off. Most importantly, they are affordable. This is truly a vehicle that is going to meet the needs of our service men and women.”

As part of its proposal, BAE Systems is proud to announce the selection of a Ford Motor Company engine to power our JLTV family of vehicles—the Power Stroke® 6.7 liter turbocharged diesel with class-leading fuel economy and the best horsepower and torque of any engine in its class. This is the same engine Ford designed, engineered, and built to power its F-Series Super Duty® trucks.

“We have worked hard over the last year to strengthen our team and our offer, bringing together the best of the defense and automotive industries,” said Ann Hoholick, BAE Systems Vice President of Amphibious & New Programs. “Ford products have a reputation for dependability and performance, even under challenging conditions. With their experience in commercial trucks, we see this as a great fit for our JLTV offer. It’s a win for us and a win for our valued customers.”

The government plans to award up to three EMD contracts in June of this year. The EMD phase of the JLTV program entails the delivery of 22 prototype vehicles and other equipment for testing, and it brings the U.S. Army and Marine Corps closer to a final vehicle to support and benefit our warfighters.

Source : BAE Systems PLC (LSE: BAES.L)

Read more: http://www.asdnews.com/news-41734/BAE_Systems-Led_Team_to_Submit_Proposal_for_JLTV_EMD_Phase.htm #ixzz1qJdVGgiE